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Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya.

C R Woese, O Kandler, and M L Wheelis PNAS June 1, 1990. 87 (12) 4576-4579; [doi.org] C R Woese Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801. O Kandler Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801. M L Wheelis Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana 61801.

Abstract

Molecular structures and sequences are generally more revealing of evolutionary relationships than are classical phenotypes (particularly so among microorganisms). Consequently, the basis for the definition of taxa has progressively shifted from the organismal to the cellular to the molecular level. Molecular comparisons show that life on this planet divides into three primary groupings, commonly known as the eubacteria, the archaebacteria, and the eukaryotes. The three are very dissimilar, the differences that separate them being of a more profound nature than the differences that separate typical kingdoms, such as animals and plants. Unfortunately, neither of the conventionally accepted views of the natural relationships among living systems--i.e., the five-kingdom taxonomy or the eukaryote-prokaryote dichotomy--reflects this primary tripartite division of the living world. To remedy this situation we propose that a formal system of organisms be established in which above the level of kingdom there exists a new taxon called a "domain." Life on this planet would then be seen as comprising three domains, the Bacteria, the Archaea, and the Eucarya, each containing two or more kingdoms. (The Eucarya, for example, contain Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, and a number of others yet to be defined). Although taxonomic structure within the Bacteria and Eucarya is not treated herein, Archaea is formally subdivided into the two kingdoms Euryarchaeota (encompassing the methanogens and their phenotypically diverse relatives) and Crenarchaeota (comprising the relatively tight clustering of extremely thermophilic archaebacteria, whose general phenotype appears to resemble most the ancestral phenotype of the Archaea.

PreviousNext Back to top Article Alerts Email Article Citation Tools Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya. C R Woese, O Kandler, M L Wheelis Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Jun 1990, 87 (12) 4576-4579; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.87.12.4576

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