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Xenic acid

Xenic acid
Structural formula
Ball-and-stick model of xenic acid
Xenic-acid-3D-vdW.svg
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
H2XeO4
Molar mass 197.31 g/mol
Related compounds
Related compounds
Perxenic acid
Xenon trioxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Xenic acid is a noble gas compound formed by the dissolution of xenon trioxide in water. Its chemical formula is H2XeO4. It is a very powerful oxidizing agent, and its decomposition is dangerous as it liberates a large amount of gaseous products: xenon, oxygen, and ozone. However, this feature is also what makes xenic acid practically useful in syntheses: there is no chance of introducing impurities to the oxidation products, as all the byproducts can be trivially evaporated.

Xenic acid has been used as an oxidizing agent in organic chemistry.

Salts of xenic acid are called xenates, containing the HXeO
4
anion. They tend to disproportionate into xenon gas and perxenates:[1]

2 HXeO
4
+ 2 OH
XeO4−
6
+ Xe + O
2
+ 2 H
2
O

The energy given off is sufficient to form ozone from diatomic oxygen:

3 O
2
(g) → 2 O
3
(g)

Salts containing the completely deprotonated anion XeO2−
4
are presently unknown.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Egon Wiberg; Nils Wiberg; Arnold Frederick Holleman (2001). Inorganic chemistry. Academic Press. p. 399. ISBN 0-12-352651-5.

Further reading

  • Bruno Jaselskis, Stanislaus Vas (May 1964). "Xenic Acid Reactions with vic-Diols". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 86 (10): 2078–2079. doi:10.1021/ja01064a041.