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Winnipeg Metro Region

Winnipeg Capital Region
Downtown Winnipeg skyline in 2019
Downtown Winnipeg skyline in 2019
Country Canada
Province Manitoba
Area
 • Total7,795.96 km2 (3,010.04 sq mi)
Population
 • Total821,537
 • Density105.4/km2 (273/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
Area code(s)204, 431

The Winnipeg Metro Region[3] (formerly called the Winnipeg Capital Region) is a metropolitan area located in the Red River Valley in the south central portion of the province of Manitoba, Canada. It contains the provincial capital of Winnipeg and its surrounding rural municipalities, cities, and towns.

History

In the late 1990s issues such as providing Shoal Lake water and to nearby municipalities and allowing exurban housing growth beyond Winnipeg became more important. At the time Mayor Susan Thompson voiced the idea of a regional planning authority to mediate such issues.[4]

In June 1998 former Great West Life President Kevin Kavannagh was appointed by Premier Filmon to Chair the Capital Region Review Committee.[5] The panel looked at land use planning and economic development. Mayor Susan Thompson and the Mayors and Reeves of 14 adjacent municipalities began to meet on a regular basis starting in October 1998.[6]

However, there was a change of government in September 1999 which made creating a regional planning authority take longer than originally foreseen.

It was created to co-ordinate land use policy and economic development between the City of Winnipeg and the surrounding municipalities. It is the most densely populated and economically important area of Manitoba.

Other communities with over 1,000 population in the region besides Winnipeg are the city of Selkirk and towns of Oakbank, Stonewall, Stony Mountain, Teulon, Lorette and Niverville.

An pro-economic growth planning document was released in November 2018 as Securing Our Future: An Action Plan for Winnipeg's Metropolitan Region.[7]

In October 2019, Dentons released a speech and discussion document, For the Benefit of All: Regional Competitiveness and Collaboration in the Winnipeg Metro Region,[8] which seeks to reform regional planning. Upon publication, Premier Pallister and Mayor Bowman spoke in favour of creating a new entity to manage development and transportation in the Winnipeg Metro Region.[9]

Membership

The Capital Region was originally defined in the The Capital Region Partnership Act (2006) to include 16 municipalities.[10] Since that time the Town of Niverville and the Village of Dunnottar have been incorporated into the Winnipeg Metropolitan Region. The Region comprises the following cities, towns and RMs:[3]

The population of the Winnipeg Metro Region is greatly concentrated within the city of Winnipeg itself, which has 86.5% of the Region's population residing in less than 6% of its land area. On the provincial level, the city has 54.9% of the province's population, while the Region's share is 63.5%.

An aerial view of Winnipeg.

However, there are some municipalities that are geographically entirely or largely within its territory that are not officially part of the Metro Region. These include the town of Teulon, the village of Garson, and the Indian reserve of Brokenhead Ojibway Nation.

The Winnipeg Metro Region includes the smaller Winnipeg census metropolitan area (CMA) with the exception of Brokenhead Ojibway Nation. The included CMA municipalities are:

Demographics

Census Area 1991 Census 1996 Census 2001 Census 2006 Census 2011 Census 2016 Census 2018 Estimate
Winnipeg[11][12] 615,215 618,477 619,544 633,451 663,617 705,244 753,700
Winnipeg CMA[13][14][15][16] 660,450 672,109 676,594 694,668 730,018 778,489 832,200
Winnipeg Capital Region[17][18] 696,453 705,806 711,455 730,305 771,616 821,537

See also

References

  1. ^ "Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region A Regional Growth Strategy and Population Analysis" (PDF). The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region. 9 May 2016. p. 4. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  2. ^ "Resources". Winnipeg Metropolitan Region. 2018. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  3. ^ a b "About Us - Winnipeg Metropolitan Region". Winnipeg Metropolitan Region. 2018. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  4. ^ Santin, Aldo (February 8, 1998). "Mayor eyes mediator in water controversy". Winnipeg Free Press. p. 3.
  5. ^ Redekop, Bill (November 9, 1998). "Hearings aim to heal relationship between city, nearby municipalities". Winnipeg Free Press. p. A3.
  6. ^ MacKenzie, Glen (October 4, 1998). "Capital region chiefs bury hatchet". Winnipeg Free Press. p. A3.
  7. ^ Securing Our Future: An Action Plan for Winnipeg's Metropolitan Region (PDF). Winnipeg Metro Region. 2018.
  8. ^ Murray, Robert W. (2019). For the Benefit of All: Regional Competitiveness and Collaboration in the Winnipeg Metro Region (PDF). Dentons.
  9. ^ Kives, Bartley (October 31, 2019). "Province may appoint new planning authority to oversee development in Winnipeg and area". CBC News Manitoba. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  10. ^ "The Capital Region Partnership Act". Government of Manitoba. 2006. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  11. ^ "2001 Census Data - The City of Winnipeg" (PDF). City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  12. ^ "Population of Winnipeg" (PDF). City of Winnipeg. March 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  13. ^ "2001 Census Data - Winnipeg Census Metropolitan Area (CMA)" (PDF). City of Winnipeg. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  14. ^ "Selected trend data for Winnipeg (CMA) for Winnipeg, 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses". Statistics Canada. 22 February 2016. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  15. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census Winnipeg [Census metropolitan area], Manitoba and Manitoba [Province]". Statistics Canada. 21 June 2019. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  16. ^ "Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas, July 1, 2018". Statistics Canada. 28 March 2019. Retrieved 5 August 2019.
  17. ^ "Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region A Regional Growth Strategy and Population Analysis" (PDF). The Partnership of the Manitoba Capital Region. 9 May 2016. p. 4. Retrieved 29 July 2019.
  18. ^ "Resources". Winnipeg Metropolitan Region. 2018. Retrieved 1 August 2019.

External links