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Waterford City (UK Parliament constituency)

Waterford City
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
18011922

Waterford City was a United Kingdom parliamentary constituency, in southeast Ireland.[1]

Boundaries and boundary changes

As the constituency for the Parliamentary borough of Waterford in County Waterford, it returned one MP 1801–1832, two in 1832–1885 and one 1885–1922.[2] It was an original constituency represented in Parliament when the Union of Great Britain and Ireland took effect on 1 January 1801.[3]

In 1918, the boundary was redefined to exclude the Kilculliheen area which had been transferred to County Kilkenny[4] under the 1898 Local Government (Ireland) Act.[5] It was defined as consisting of the county borough of Waterford and the District Electoral Divisions of Ballynakill, Kilbarry, Killoteran and Waterford Rural in the rural district of Waterford.

Following the dissolution of Parliament in 1922 the area was no longer represented in the United Kingdom House of Commons.[6]

Politics

The constituency was a predominantly Nationalist area in 1918.[7] The seat was contested by William Redmond, the son of the IPP leader John Redmond whom he replaced in the Waterford City constituency in a by-election held in March 1918.[8] In the general election of December 1918, it was the only Irish seat the IPP won outside Ulster.[9]

The First Dáil

Sinn Féin contested the general election of 1918 on the platform that instead of taking up any seats they won in the United Kingdom Parliament, they would establish a revolutionary assembly in Dublin.[10] In republican theory every MP elected in Ireland was a potential Deputy to this assembly. In practice only the Sinn Féin members accepted the offer.

The revolutionary First Dáil assembled on 21 January 1919 and last met on 10 May 1921.[11] The First Dáil, according to a resolution passed on 10 May 1921, was formally dissolved on the assembling of the Second Dáil. This took place on 16 August 1921.

In 1921 Sinn Féin decided to use the UK authorised elections for the Northern Ireland House of Commons and the House of Commons of Southern Ireland as a poll for the Irish Republic's Second Dáil. This area, in republican theory, was incorporated in the five member Dáil constituency of Waterford–Tipperary East.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1801–32

Election Member Party Life
1801 William Congreve Alcock Tory c. 1771–1813
1803 Sir John Newport, Bt.[12] Whig 1756–1843

MPs 1832–85

Representation increased to two members

Election 1st Member 1st Party 2nd Member 2nd Party
1832 Henry Barron Repeal Association[13] William Christmas Tory[14][13]
1834 Conservative[14][13]
1835 Thomas Wyse Whig[14]
1841 William Christmas Conservative[14][13] William Morris Reade Conservative[14][13]
1841 Henry Barron Whig[14][15][16] Thomas Wyse Whig[14][15][16]
1847 Thomas Meagher Repeal Association[13] Daniel O'Connell Jnr Repeal Association[13]
1848 by-election Henry Barron Whig[14][15][16]
1852 Ind. Irish[13] Robert Keating Ind. Irish[13]
1857 John Aloysius Blake Ind. Irish[13] Michael D. Hassard Conservative[13]
1859 Liberal[13]
1865 Henry Barron Liberal[13]
1868 James Delahunty Liberal[13]
1869 Henry Barron Liberal[13]
1870 by-election Ralph Bernal Osborne Liberal[13]
1874 Richard Power Home Rule League[13] Purcell O'Gorman Home Rule League[13]
1880 Edmund Leamy Home Rule League (Parnellite)[13]
1882 Irish Parliamentary Party[13] Irish Parliamentary Party[13]
1885 Reduced to 1 seat

MPs 1885–1918

Representation reduced to one member

Election Member Party
1885 Richard Power Nationalist
1890 Parnellite
1892 by-election John Redmond Parnellite
1900 Nationalist
1918 by-election William Redmond Nationalist
1922 UK constituency abolished

Elections

The single-member elections in this constituency took place using the first past the post electoral system. Multi-member elections used the plurality-at-large voting system.[17]

Elections in the 1850s

General Election 1852: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Irish Thomas Meagher 463 29.5
Independent Irish Robert Keating 445 28.3
Conservative William Christmas 355 22.6 N/A
Whig Henry Barron 309 19.7
Majority 90 5.7
Turnout 786 (est) 69.3 (est)
Registered electors 1,135
Independent Irish gain from Irish Repeal Swing
Independent Irish gain from Irish Repeal Swing
General Election 1857: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Irish John Aloysius Blake 519 33.1 −24.7
Conservative Michael D. Hassard 479 30.5 +7.9
Whig Henry Barron 330 21.0 +1.3
Radical Andrew Carew O'Dwyer[18][19] 242 15.4 N/A
Turnout 785 (est) 67.7 (est) −1.6
Registered electors 1,160
Majority 40 2.5 −3.2
Independent Irish hold Swing −16.3
Majority 149 9.5 N/A
Conservative gain from Independent Irish Swing +16.3
General Election 1859: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Michael D. Hassard 536 35.3 +4.8
Liberal John Aloysius Blake 529 34.8 +1.7
Liberal Henry Barron 455 29.9 +8.9
Majority 7 0.5 −9.0
Turnout 760 (est) 67.0 (est) −0.7
Registered electors 1,134
Conservative hold Swing −2.9
Liberal hold Swing −0.4

Elections in the 1860s

General Election 1865: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Aloysius Blake 592 40.8 +6.0
Liberal Henry Barron 516 35.5 +5.6
Liberal John Barrington 344 23.7 N/A
Majority 172 11.8 N/A
Turnout 726 (est) 62.8 (est) −4.2
Registered electors 1,156
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General Election 1868: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Aloysius Blake 796 44.0 +3.2
Liberal James Delahunty 583 32.2 N/A
Liberal Henry Barron 430 23.8 +0.1
Majority 153 8.5 −3.3
Turnout 905 (est) 65.4 (est) +2.6
Registered electors 1,383
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Blake resigned after he was appointed inspector of Irish fisheries, causing a by-election.

By-election, 22 November 1869: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Henry Barron 487 50.8 +27.0
Liberal Ralph Bernal Osborne 471 49.2 N/A
Majority 16 1.7 −6.8
Turnout 958 69.3 +3.9
Registered electors 1,383
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1870s

Barron was unseated on petition, causing a by-election.

By-election, 25 Feb 1870: Waterford City (1 seat)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Ralph Bernal Osborne 483 50.4 N/A
Independent Nationalist Patrick Joseph Smyth 475 49.6 N/A
Majority 8 0.8 −7.7
Turnout 958 69.3 +3.9
Registered electors 1,383
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General Election 1874: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Home Rule Richard Power 526 27.8 N/A
Home Rule Purcell O'Gorman 480 25.4 N/A
Conservative Edward Gibson 365 19.3 N/A
Home Rule James Delahunty 360 19.0 N/A
Liberal Ralph Bernal Osborne 160 8.5 N/A
Majority 115 6.1 N/A
Turnout 1,208 (est) 87.7 (est) +22.3
Registered electors 1,378
Home Rule gain from Liberal Swing N/A
Home Rule gain from Liberal Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General Election 1880: Waterford City (2 seats)[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Home Rule Richard Power 661 42.0 +14.2
Home Rule League (Parnellite) Edmund Leamy 494 31.4 +12.4
Home Rule Purcell O'Gorman 420 26.7 +1.3
Majority 74 4.7 −1.4
Turnout 788 (est) 54.3 (est) −33.4
Registered electors 1,449
Home Rule hold Swing N/A
Home Rule hold Swing N/A
General Election 1885: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary Richard Power 2,420 89.8 N/A
Irish Conservative Fitzmaurice Gustavus Bloomfield 276 10.2 N/A
Majority 2,144 79.5 N/A
Turnout 2,696 68.3 +14.0 (est)
Registered electors 3,946
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A
General Election 1886: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary Richard Power Unopposed
Registered electors 3,946
Irish Parliamentary hold

Elections in the 1890s

Power died, causing a by-election.

By-election 1891: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish National League John Redmond 1,775 59.1 N/A
Irish National Federation Michael Davitt 1,229 40.9 N/A
Majority 546 18.2 N/A
Turnout 3,004 74.2 N/A
Registered electors 4,046
Irish National League gain from Irish Parliamentary Swing N/A
General Election 1892: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish National League John Redmond 1,676 56.4 N/A
Irish National Federation David Sheehy 1,293 43.6 N/A
Majority 383 12.9 N/A
Turnout 2,969 74.7 N/A
Registered electors 3,974
Irish National League gain from Irish Parliamentary Swing N/A
General Election 1895: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish National League John Redmond 1,788 59.3 +2.9
Irish National Federation Thomas Joseph Farrell 1,229 40.7 −2.9
Majority 559 18.5 +5.6
Turnout 3,017 76.8 +2.1
Registered electors 3,927
Irish National League hold Swing +2.9

Elections in the 1900s

General Election 1900: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary John Redmond Unopposed
Registered electors 3,941
Irish Parliamentary hold
General Election 1906: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary John Redmond Unopposed
Registered electors 3,354
Irish Parliamentary hold

Elections in the 1910s

General Election January 1910: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary John Redmond Unopposed
Registered electors 3,104
Irish Parliamentary hold
General Election December 1910: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary John Redmond Unopposed
Registered electors 3,104
Irish Parliamentary hold
By-election, 1918: Waterford City[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary William Redmond 1,242 62.5 N/A
Sinn Féin Vincent White 745 37.5 N/A
Majority 497 25.0 N/A
Turnout 1,987 66.9 N/A
Registered electors 2,972
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A
General Election 14 December 1918: Waterford City
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Irish Parliamentary William Redmond 4,915 52.6 N/A
Sinn Féin Vincent White 4,431 47.4 N/A
Majority 484 5.2 N/A
Turnout 9,346 77.5 N/A
Registered electors 12,063
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A

See also

References

  1. ^ "Waterford City is..." Ireland.com. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  2. ^ Higgs, Elizabeth Anne. "'THE NATURE AND DEVELOPMENT OF LIBERAL PROTESTANTISM IN WATERFORD, 1800-42'" (PDF). Maynooth University.
  3. ^ "Act of Union | United Kingdom [1801]". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  4. ^ "Lá na mBan 1918 – An Irishwoman's Diary on Kilkenny's protest against conscription". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  5. ^ Board, Ireland Local Government (1905). Annual Report of the Local Government Board for Ireland for the Year ...: Being the ... Report Under "The Local Government Board (Ireland) Act, 1872", 35 & 36 Vic., C. 69 ... H.M. Stationery Office.
  6. ^ "British Withdrawl (1922) - General Michael Collins". www.generalmichaelcollins.com. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  7. ^ "The Irish General Election of 1918". www.ark.ac.uk. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  8. ^ Jonathan Githens-Mazer, Myths and Memories of the Easter Rising, Cultural and Political Nationalism in Ireland, (Dublin and Portland, OR: Irish Academic Press, 2006), 202
  9. ^ Brian, Walker, ed, Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801–1922, (Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1978), 187–191
  10. ^ Correspondant, From our Irish (1918-12-16). "The Sinn Fein tide". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  11. ^ "The First Dáil". RTÉ Archives. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  12. ^ On petition Alcock was unseated and Newport was declared elected, 7 December 1803.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an Walker, B.M., ed. (1978). Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801-1922. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy. ISBN 0901714127.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Smith, Henry Stooks (1842). The Register of Parliamentary Contested Elections (Second ed.). Simpkin, Marshall & Company. p. 242. Retrieved 14 October 2018 – via Google Books.
  15. ^ a b c "General Election". Coventry Herald. 16 July 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 14 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  16. ^ a b c "Election Intelligence". Berkshire Chronicle. 14 August 1847. p. 1. Retrieved 14 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  17. ^ Kelleher, Jason. "Irish Political Maps: Referendum 1959: "First Past The Post" electoral system". Irish Political Maps. Retrieved 2018-11-20.
  18. ^ "Waterford News". 10 April 1857. p. 4. Retrieved 14 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).
  19. ^ "City of Waterford". Dublin Daily Express. 2 April 1857. p. 3. Retrieved 14 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive. (Subscription required (help)).

Sources

  • GITHENS-MAZER, Jonathan. Myths and Memories of the Easter Rising, Cultural and Political Nationalism in Ireland. Dublin and Portland, OR: Irish Academic Press, 2006, 238p.
  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844–50), 2nd edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973)
  • Parliamentary Election Results in Ireland, 1801–1922, edited by B.M. Walker (Royal Irish Academy 1978)
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament: Volume II 1886–1918, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (The Harvester Press 1978)
  • Who's Who of British members of parliament: Volume III 1919–1945, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (The Harvester Press 1979)
  • Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "W" (part 1)

External links

Notes and References