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Viktor Hamburger

Viktor Hamburger
Born(1900-07-09)July 9, 1900
DiedJune 12, 2001(2001-06-12) (aged 100)
NationalityGerman
Alma materUniversity of Freiburg
Known forNerve growth factor
Scientific career
FieldsEmbryology
InstitutionsWashington University in St. Louis
Doctoral advisorHans Spemann

Viktor Hamburger (July 9, 1900 – June 12, 2001)[1] was a German professor and embryologist. In 1951 he co-authored the Hamburger-Hamilton stages. Hamburger lectured, among others, Nobel Prize-winning neurologist Rita Levi-Montalcini,[2] who identified nerve growth factor along with Hamburger when they collaborated. Hamburger began to work at Washington University in St. Louis in 1935; he retired from his professor position in 1969 and continued researching until the 1980s.[3]

Early life

Hamburger was born on (1900-07-09)July 9, 1900 in Landeshut, Silesia, Germany to Max Hamburger and Else Gradenwitz.[4]

Career

In the 1960s, Hamburger did embryological work that established that chick movements in embryo were spontaneous patterns, a finding that contradicted contemporary assertions of behavioral psychologists.[3][5]

Hamburger later revisited nerve growth factor, demonstrating that it was required for the maintenance of neural cells.[6]

Selected Awards

References

Notes
  1. ^ Noden, Drew M. "Viktor Hamburger (1900-2001)". Society for Developmental Biology. Retrieved 2008-05-09.
  2. ^ Cowan, W. M. (2001). "Viktor Hamburger Andrita Levi-Montalcini: The Path to the Discovery of Nerve Growth Factor". Annual Review of Neuroscience. 24: 551–600. doi:10.1146/annurev.neuro.24.1.551. PMID 11283321.
  3. ^ a b Freeman, Karen (2001-06-14). "Viktor Hamburger, 100, Dies; Embryologist Revealed Architecture of Nervous System". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2013-05-26.
  4. ^ Hamburger, Viktor (1996). "Viktor Hamburger". In Squire, Larry R. (ed.). The history of neuroscience in autobiography. Washington DC: Society for Neuroscience. p. 223. ISBN 0-916110-51-6. Retrieved 2013-08-05.
  5. ^ Hamburger, V.; Wenger, E.; Oppenheim, R. (1966). "Motility in the chick embryo in the absence of sensory input". Journal of Experimental Zoology. 162 (2): 133. doi:10.1002/jez.1401620202.
  6. ^ Navis, Adam R. (2012-05-08). "Viktor Hamburger". Embryo Project Encyclopedia. Tempe, Arizona: Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences, Center for Biology and Society. Retrieved 2013-05-26.
  7. ^ [www.uu.se]
Bibliography
  • Hamburger, Viktor (1996). "Viktor Hamburger". In Squire, Larry R. (ed.). The history of neuroscience in autobiography. Washington DC: Society for Neuroscience. pp. 222‒250. ISBN 0-916110-51-6. Retrieved 2013-05-26.

External links