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Vanadium(III) fluoride

Vanadium(III) fluoride
RhF3.png
Names
Other names
Vanadium fluoride, Vanadium trifluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.030.141
UNII
Properties
F3V
Molar mass 107.9367 g·mol−1
Appearance Yellow-green powder (anhydrous)
Green powder (trihydrate)[1]
Density 3.363 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 1,395 °C (2,543 °F; 1,668 K)
at 760 mmHg (anhydrous)
~ 100 °C (212 °F; 373 K)
at 760 mmHg (trihydrate) decomposes[1]
Boiling point Sublimes
Insoluble[1]
Solubility Insoluble in EtOH[1]
2.757·10−3 cm3/mol[1]
Structure
Rhombohedral, hR24[2]
R3c, No. 167[2]
3 2/m[2]
a = 5.17 Å, c = 13.402 Å[2]
α = 90°, β = 90°, γ = 120°
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS05: CorrosiveGHS06: Toxic[3]
GHS signal word Danger
H301, H311, H331, H314[3]
P261, P280, P301+310, P305+351+338, P310[3]
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g. waterHealth code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g. chlorine gasReactivity code 2: Undergoes violent chemical change at elevated temperatures and pressures, reacts violently with water, or may form explosive mixtures with water. E.g. white phosphorusSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
0
3
2
Related compounds
Other anions
Vanadium(III) chloride
Vanadium(III) oxide
Vanadium(III) nitride
Other cations
Vanadium(IV) fluoride
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Vanadium(III) fluoride is the chemical compound with the formula VF3. This yellow-green, refractory solid is obtained in a two-step procedure from V2O3.[4] Similar to other transition-metal fluorides (such as MnF2), it exhibits magnetic ordering at low temperatures (e.g. V2F6.4H2O orders below 12 K[5]).

Preparation

The first step entails conversion to the hexafluorovanadate(III) salt using ammonium bifluoride:

V2O3 + 6 (NH4)HF2 → 2 (NH4)3VF6 + 3 H2O

In the second step, the hexafluorovanadate is thermally decomposed.

(NH4)3VF6 → 3 NH3 + 3 HF + VF3

The thermal decomposition of ammonium salts is a relatively common method for the preparation of inorganic solids.

VF3 can also be prepared by treatment of V2O3 with HF(reference needed). VF3 is a crystalline solid with 6 coordinate vanadium atoms with bridging fluorine atoms. The magnetic moment indicates the presence of two unpaired electrons.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Lide, David R., ed. (2009). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (90th ed.). Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. ISBN 978-1-4200-9084-0.
  2. ^ a b c d Douglas, Bodie E.; Ho, Shih-Ming (2007). Structure and Chemistry of Crystalline Solids. New York: Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. p. 102. ISBN 0-387-26147-8.
  3. ^ a b c Sigma-Aldrich Co., Vanadium(III) fluoride. Retrieved on 2014-06-25.
  4. ^ Sturm, B. J.; Sheridan, C. W. "Vanadium(III) Fluoride" Inorganic Syntheses 1963; Vol. 7, pages 52-54. ISBN 0-88275-165-4.
  5. ^ S. Nakhal et al., Z. Kristallogr. 228, 347 (2013).doi:10.1524/zkri.2013.1664