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Tropical fascism

In African political science, tropical fascism is a type of post-colonial state which is either considered fascist or is seen to have strong fascist tendencies.[1] Gnassingbé Eyadéma dictator of Togo and leader of the Rally of the Togolese People, Mobutu Sese Seko dictator of Zaire and leader of the Popular Movement of the Revolution and Idi Amin dictator of Uganda have all been considered an example of tropical fascism in Africa.[2] The Coalition for the Defence of the Republic and larger Hutu Power movement, a Hutu ultranationalist and supremacist movement that organized and committed the Rwandan Genocide aimed at exterminating the Tutsi people of Rwanda, has been regarded as a prominent example of tropical fascism in Africa.[3] Pol Pot and The Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia has been called a tropical fascist regime, as they officially renounced communism in 1981.

The Hutu Power movement in Rwanda, a movement based on Hutu ultranationalism and Hutu supremacy over Tutsis, and the intention of extermination of the Tutsis, has been regarded as a fascist movement.[4][5]

Examples

The following regimes have been described as Tropical fascist:

See also

References

  1. ^ African geopolitics , Issues 17-20. OR.IMA International, 2005. Pp. 104.
  2. ^ African geopolitics , Issues 17-20. OR.IMA International, 2005. Pp. 104.
  3. ^ Pierre Hazan, Sarah De Stadelhofen. Judging war, judging history: behind truth and reconciliation.Stanford University Press, 2010. Pp. 143.
  4. ^ Africa research bulletin: Political, social, and cultural series, Volume 40. Blackwell, 2003. Pp. 5402.
  5. ^ Pierre Hazan, Sarah De Stadelhofen. Judging war, judging history: behind truth and reconciliation. Stanford University Press, 2010. Pp. 143.
  6. ^ [www.press.uillinois.edu]