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Tropical Storm Vicente (2018)

Tropical Storm Vicente
Tropical Storm (SSHWS/NWS)
Vicente 2018-10-19 1915Z.jpg
Vicente shortly after reaching tropical storm strength on October 19
FormedOctober 19, 2018
DissipatedOctober 23, 2018
Highest winds1-minute sustained: 50 mph (85 km/h)
Lowest pressure1002 mbar (hPa); 29.59 inHg
Fatalities16 total
Damage$7.05 million (2018 USD)
Areas affectedCentral America, Southwestern Mexico
Part of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season

Tropical Storm Vicente was a weak and small tropical cyclone affected the southwestern Mexico in late October 2018, causing deadly flooding and mudslides. The twenty-first named storm of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season, Vicente originated from a trough of low pressure that formed within a large area of disturbed weather near Central America early on October 19. Around midday, the disturbance organized into a tropical depression, which prompted the National Hurricane Center to begin issuing advisories. Later in day, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and was assigned the name Vicente. Despite having only been a weak tropical storm, Vicente developed an intermittent eye-like feature. Unfavorable conditions prevented strengthening until late on October 20. At that time, Vicente peaked with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 1002 mbar (29.59 inHg). A day later, Vicente began to weaken due increasing wind shear before slightly restrengthening early on October 22. On October 23, Vicente weakened into a tropical depression. Later in the day, Vicente degenerated into a remnant low after making landfall in southwestern Mexico, before dissipating soon afterward.

Vicente brought heavy rains in Mexico, which caused flooding and mudslides and killed 16 individuals.

Meteorological history

Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

Tropical Storm Vicente originated from a tropical wave located over the Central America on October 16. On October 17, the wave emerged into the Pacific, and deep convection increased as it moved along a monsoon trough.[1] The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that an elongated low-pressure area developed to the south of Guatemala later that day.[2] The original low continued to moved west-northwestward an ultimately became Hurricane Willa.[3] Early on October 19, a new trough of low pressure developed to the east of the original low, within a broad area of disturbed weather.[4] The convection became more organized as it moved slowly west-northwestward.[5] At 06:00 UTC, the low developed into a tropical depression.[1] Twelve hours later, the depression intensified to a tropical storm and was assigned the name Vicente.[1] At that time, the NHC noted that although Vicente was a tiny tropical cyclone, it had well-defined convective banding.[6]

Soon afterward, Vicente's circulation was disrupted by moderate northwesterly wind shear as it paralleled to the Guatemalan coast. The NHC noted that Vicente's low-level circulation center was almost completely exposed.[7] Despite this, Vicente occasionally displayed an eye-like feature,[8] and sea surface temperature of 29 °C (84 °F) allowed Vicente to slowly intensity.[9] Late on October 20, Vicente accelerated and turned to the west under the influence of the Gulf of Tehuantepec gap wind and a strong subtropical ridge.[7][9] The storm reached its peak intensity with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 km/h) and a minimum central pressure of 1002 mbar (29.59 inHg) at 18:00 UTC, while passing within 115 mi (185 km) south of the OaxacaChiapas border.[1] Vicente remained a compact tropical cyclone, as its tropical storm-force winds extended outwards just 25 mi (40 km) from the center.[10]

Vicente turned to the south-southwest on October 21.[11] The storm began to weaken later that day, due to increasing north-northeasterly wind shear, and the low-level circulation center was exposed.[12] Vicente slightly strengthened on October 22, after developed a burst of deep convection developed and a curved banding features.[13] At the same time, Vicente turned to the north-northwest, as the storm moved along the southwestern side of a mid-level ridge.[14] However, this strengthening trend was short-lived, as the outflow from larger circulation of Hurricane Willa to the west produced strong northeasterly wind shear. The deep convection were limited and sporadic, and the storm became disorganized.[15] At 06:00 UTC on October 23, Vicente weakened to a tropical depression, as the convection continued to deteriorate.[16] At 13:30 UTC, the poorly organized system made landfall near Playa Azul in the Mexican state of Michoacán, with winds of 30 mph (45 km/h).[1] Vicente dissipated later that day, over the mountain terrain of Mexico.[1]

Impact

On October 23, between 8:00–8:30 a.m. CDT (13:00–13:30 UTC), Vicente made landfall as a tropical depression near Lázaro Cárdenas, Michoacán.[17] The system quickly degenerated into a remnant low after moving ashore.[1] The system brought heavy rainfall to the region, particularly in Oaxaca, that caused widespread flooding and mudslides.[18] Multiple rivers in the state overtopped their banks and inundated nearby communities. A landslide in Santiago Choapam destroyed three homes.[19] Emergency declarations were issued for 167 municipalities,[20] 21 of which were isolated by flood waters.[21] At least 13 people died throughout the state,[18] 6 of whom died in a landslide in San Pedro Ocotepec.[18] Four other persons traveling from San Juan Metaltepec disappeared during a landslide.[18] The Mexican Army and Navy alongside State Police deployed 10,000 personnel to assist in recovery efforts.[21]

Fringe effects from the storm triggered flooding in Veracruz, leaving three people dead.[22] Agricultural loss in Colima were about MX$136 million (US$7.05 million).[23] Due to the unsettled weather produced by Vicente and the nearby Hurricane Willa, numerous oil tankers were unable to unload fuel at ports in Manzanillo and Tuxpan. Combined with the closure of a major pipeline that transports petroleum to Guadalajara, this caused a fuel shortage in Jalisco, with some 500 gas stations being affected.[24]

Around the same time, Vicente and Willa together forced the Norwegian Bliss cruise ship to divert to San Diego, California.[25]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Latto, Andrew S.; Beven II, John L. (April 10, 2019). Tropical Storm Vicente (PDF) (Report). Tropical Cyclone Report. Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 11, 2019.
  2. ^ Stewart, Stacy (October 17, 2018). Two-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook: 5:00 am PDT, Wed Oct 17 2018. National Hurricane Center (Report). Miami, Florida: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 19, 2018.
  3. ^ Berg, Robbie (October 20, 2018). Tropical Storm Willa Discussion Number 2 (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  4. ^ Zelinsky, David (October 19, 2018). Two-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook: 5:00 pm PDT, Thur Oct 18 2018. National Hurricane Center (Report). Miami, Florida: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  5. ^ Zelinsky, David (October 19, 2018). Two-Day Graphical Tropical Weather Outlook: 11:00 pm PDT, Thur Oct 18 2018. National Hurricane Center (Report). Miami, Florida: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  6. ^ Berg, Robbie (19 October 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 2. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  7. ^ a b Zelinsky, David (October 20, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 3. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  8. ^ Stewart, Stacy (October 20, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 4. National Hurricane Center (Report). Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Avila, Lixion (October 20, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 5. National Hurricane Center (Report). Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  10. ^ Avila, Lixion. Tropical Storm Vicente Advisory Number 6. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  11. ^ Stewart, Stacy (October 21, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 8. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  12. ^ Pasch, Richard (October 21, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 10. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  13. ^ Roberts, Dave (October 22, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 12. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  14. ^ Pasch, Richard; Latto, Andrew (October 22, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 13. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  15. ^ Pasch, Richard (October 22, 2018). Tropical Storm Vicente Discussion Number 14. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  16. ^ Berg, Robbie (October 23, 2018). Tropical Depression Vicente Discussion Number 16. National Hurricane Center (Report). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  17. ^ "Vicente toca tierra en Michoacán como depresión tropical". El Heraldo. October 23, 2018. Retrieved October 27, 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d Jaque (October 26, 2018). "Aumenta cifra de muertos por lluvias en Oaxaca, suman 13". Regeneración (in Spanish). Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  19. ^ Ismael García (October 21, 2018). "Suman 9 muertos per tormenta tropical "Vicente" en Oaxaca". El Universal (in Spanish). Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  20. ^ "Por daños de "Vicente", Oaxaca solicita Declaratoria de Emergencia para 167 municipios" (in Spanish). ADN Suerste. October 22, 2018. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  21. ^ a b "Tormenta "Vicente" deja Comunidades Incomunicadas en Oaxaca" (in Spanish). Noticieros Televisa. October 23, 2018. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  22. ^ Isabel Zamudio (October 22, 2018). "Tormenta tropical 'Vicente' deja tres muertos en Veracruz" (in Spanish). Milenio. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  23. ^ Bertha Munguía (October 24, 2018). "Daños mínimos deja "Willa" y " Vicente"" (in Spanish). Meganoticias. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  24. ^ "Jalisco fuel shortages due to hurricane, tropical storm, pipeline taps". November 6, 2018. Retrieved December 3, 2018.
  25. ^ Saunders, Mark. "Tropical storms force Norwegian Bliss cruise ship to divert to San Diego". 10news. ABC. Retrieved 25 October 2018.

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