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Tomonoura

Tomonoura
Lighthouse
Tomonoura featured on a 1939 stamp of Japan.

Tomonoura (鞆の浦), formerly known as Tomonotsu (鞆の津), is a port in the Tomo ward of Fukuyama, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan. It stands on the southern point of the Numakuma Peninsula, 14 kilometers south of Fukuyama Station.

Tomonoura has been a prosperous port since ancient times. Its unique circular harbor was preserved even after modern port facilities were introduced. Tomonoura lies within Tomokōen (鞆公園), which forms part of the Setonaikai National Park. In 2007, the port was listed as one of the top 100 scenic municipalities in Japan and its harbor was listed as one of the top 100 historical natural features in Japan.[citation needed]

There are many historical temples and shrines around Tomonoura, and the area is famous for red sea bream (真鯛, Madai) fishing.[1]

History

Preserving the historic harbor

The local government had a plan to build a bridge over the scenic harbor for a bypass road, which caused conflict with members of the local community concerned about the preservation of the historic harbor. The plan has now been overturned by the Hiroshima District Court.[3][4][5][6] The plan led to the town being included in the World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund in 2002 and 2004. This organization later helped to restore a historic merchant house in the town with financial support from American Express. The 19th-century residence, known as Uoya-Manzo, has since become an information center and guesthouse for visitors.[7]

In the arts and literature

Poetry

Man'yōshū - (7th to 8th century) (8 poems, including 2 Ōtomo no Tabito's poems)

Music

Books

  • Tomonotsu Chakaiki (1986), a novel by Masuji Ibuse about the life of Toyotomi Hideyoshi
  • 鞆の浦殺人事件 (Murder in Tomonoura, 1988), a detective novel by Yasuo Uchida

Photography exhibitions

尾道への旅 (A Journey to Onomichi, 2006) by Wim Wenders

Films

See also

References

  1. ^ Adika, Alon, "Taking in Tomonoura's many delights", Japan Times, 24 July 2011, p. 10.
  2. ^ Engishiki
  3. ^ "Save Tomonoura".
  4. ^ "ICOMOS Symposium 2006".
  5. ^ "report of Tomonoura 2009".
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-07-13. Retrieved 2009-10-05.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ World Monuments Fund - Tomo Port Town

External links