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The Hospital Club

The Hospital Club, main entrance

The Hospital Club London is a private members club for people in the creative industries. It houses a television studio, screening room, live performance space, restaurant, lounges and gallery over seven floors. The club is at 24 Endell Street, Covent Garden, London on the site of an 18th-century hospital.

Description

Reception
Cinema

The Hospital Club London was founded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen through his investment company Vulcan Inc. and musician David A. Stewart (formerly of the band Eurythmics), producer and Founder of Weapons of Mass Entertainment.[1]

History of the building

As its name suggests, for many years the building was home to St Paul's Hospital, first established in 1749.

  • 1749 — British Lying-In Hospital opened at 24 Endell Street[2]
  • 1913 — British Lying-In Hospital closed[2]
  • 1923 — St Paul's Hospital moves from Red Lion Square to 24 Endell Street[3]
  • 1992 — St Paul's Hospital closed[3]
  • 1996 — Building purchased by Paul Allen, planning submitted. Local objections to development mean the project stalls for a number of years while a compromise with residents is worked out[1]
  • 2004 — Private members' club, restaurant and recording studio open[4]

Food hygiene ratings

In 2014, the club received a zero rating for food hygiene after an inspection found mouse droppings in kitchens, prompting worries of cross-contamination.[5]

In 2015, The Hospital Club received a five-star rating by the Foods Standard Agency.[6]

Television studio

Post-Paralympics legacy event in the studio

The venue's 2,700 square feet (250 m2)[7] television studio is located two floors below ground level, and when it opened in 2003 was the first high-definition television studio in the UK. A grid height of 4.4 metres (14 ft) and a size of 61 feet x 44 feet, roughly equivalent to that of Television Centre's TC2, means it is well used for programme production[8].

The studio can accommodate an audience of approximately 200 people sitting or standing[9]. It was recently upgraded, with particular focus on the sound production room which was upgraded in conjunction with Solid State Logic[10].

Productions

References

  1. ^ a b Naylor, Tony (28 February 2015). "The Hospital Club, Covent Garden, London: hotel review". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 26 January 2017.
  2. ^ a b "British Lying-In Hospital". Lost Hospitals of London. Retrieved 13 July 2018.
  3. ^ a b "St Paul's Hospital, Endell Street". Lost Hospitals of London. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  4. ^ "Meet Sue Walter at The Hospital Club". 26 September 2012. Retrieved 13 July 2018.
  5. ^ "Celebrity club gets zero ratings from hygiene inspectors". The Times, 16 September 2014, p. 22.
  6. ^ The Hospital Group. Food Standards Agency, 2015. Retrieved 12 March 2015.
  7. ^ "TV & Music Studios". thehospitalclub. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  8. ^ "The Hospital Club Studio". tv studio history. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  9. ^ "The Studio @ The Hospital Club". Hire Space. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  10. ^ "The Hospital Club Moves to SSL System T". Solid State Logic. Retrieved 20 January 2019.

External links

Media related to The Hospital Club at Wikimedia Commons