This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

Ten'edn

Maniq
Tonga
Ten'edn
Native toThailand, Malaysia
EthnicityManiq people
Native speakers
365 (2007-2014)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3tnz
Glottologtong1308[2]

Ten'edn, also known as Kensiu and Mos in Thailand and, in some previous literature, Tonga, is an aboriginal Mon–Khmer language spoken by the Maniq tribe of Thailand and Malaya.

According to Benjamin (2012), Maniq (Məniʔ, Maniʔ) can refer to the following three or more speech varieties:

  • Tonga' (Toŋaʔ)
  • Mos (Mɔs)
  • Teanean (Ten'en, Tɛnʔɛn, Tean-ean)

Sample vocabulary

Here are some odour terms in Maniq:[3]

Maniq language Jahai language Number of objects Examplars
caŋə 9 tubers (Dioscorea spp.) (4), food (1), cooked food (1), cooked meat (1), rice (1), wild pig (Sus scrofa) (1), cooked wild pig (1), fresh meat (1), white sun (1)
caŋɛs 8 animal hair (1), hair of dusky leaf monkey (Trachypithecus obscurus) (1), hair of banded leaf monkey (Presbytis femoralis) (1), hair of pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) (1), burnt hair (1), burnt animal hair (1), roasted animal fat (1), sun (1)
caŋus 9 soap (3), washing oneself (2), fruit (Goniothalamus sp.) (1), leaves (1), Uvaria sp. (1), clothes (1), talcum powder (1), sun (1), medicine to drink (1)
hamis 2 sun (6), air/smoke coming from the sun (2)
haʔĩt haʔɛ̃t 10 dead animal (3), rotting animal (3), animal (1), plantain squirrel (Callosciurus notatus) (1), Prevost’s squirrel (Callosciurus prevostii) (1), (wac caw ‘kind of squirrel’) (1), bats (1), flying fox (Pteropus cf. vampyrus) (1), tuber (Dioscorea daunea) (1), bamboo tube (1)
kamɛh 6 (taluŋ ‘kind of millipede A’) (5), (caŋwɔɲ ‘kind of millipede B’) (1), (kaʔɔʔ basiŋ ‘kind of millipede C’) (1), Ipoh poison (Antiaris toxicaria) (1), flying fox (Pteropus cf. vampyrus) (1), forest (1)
kamloh 3 smoke from fire (3), old shelter (1), bathing (1)
lspəs ltpɨt 14 tuber (Dioscorea orbiculata) (2), bearcat (Arctictis binturong) (2), tuber (Dioscorea filiformis) (1), tuber (Dioscorea calcicola) (1), tubers (Dioscorea spp.) (1), new shelter (1), clean and dry clothes (1), fruit (Ficus chartacea) (1), forest (1), tree (1), animal (1), food (1), medicine to drink (1), white sun (1)
palɛŋ plʔeŋ 11 blood (3), animal blood (1), blood of wild pig (Sus scrofa) (1), blood of pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) (1), blood of long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) (1), blood of bearcat (Arctictis binturong) (1), raw meat (1), (pɔʔ batewfern sp.’) (1), (smkam ‘plant sp.’) (1), searching for food (1), sun (1)
paʔɔ̞̃ʔ 16 tuber (Dioscorea daunea) (2), mushroom (2), pouring water (1), fetching water (1), mud (1), digging tubers in mud (1), cooking muddy tubers (1), wet or dirty clothes (1), rotting bamboo tube (1), soil (1), searching for food (1), petai (Parkia speciosa) (1), Parkia timoriana (1), sweat (1), urine (1), old shelter (1)
miʔ bayɔ̞̃ɸ 12 old shelter (3), soil (2), shelter (1), mushrooms (1), skin of a dead animal (1), rotten wood (1), bamboo tube for water (1), drinking water from a bamboo tube (1), rotten leaf (1), head of banded leaf monkey (Presbytis femoralis) (1), head of pig-tailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) (1), head of stump-tailed macaque (Macaca arctoides) (1)
miʔ danɔw 10 mushrooms (3), rotten wood (2), rotten mushrooms (1), old shelter (1), animal bones (1), durian seed (1), snakes (1), forest (1), searching for food (1), soil (1)
miʔ huhũɸ 10 snakes (2), soil (2), searching for tubers (1), digging tubers (1), mushrooms (1), sweat (1), rotten wood (1), walking in the forest (1), making fire (1), smoke (1)
miʔ latɨŋ 10 soil (2), burning fire (1), (tanɔl ‘kind of fire wood A’) (1), (ɲeʔɲeʔ ‘kind of fire wood B’) (1), (tŋwaŋ ‘kind of flower’) (1), (kabɨʔ lɨkhɨ ‘kind of fruit’) (1), (bacen ‘food item (unknown)’) (1), mushrooms (1), tree (1), walking in the forest (1)
miʔ ɲətuʔ 7 tree sap (1), leaves (1), garlic (1), soil (1), forest (1), searching for food (1), (kabɨʔ ɲɛʔɲɛʔ ‘kind of fruit) (1)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Ten'edn". Ethnologue. Retrieved 2018-07-25.
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Maniq". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ Ewelina Wnuk & Asifa Majid (April 2014). "Revisiting the limits of language: The odor lexicon of Maniq" (PDF). Cognition Volume 131, Issue 1. p. 128. Retrieved 2017-07-12.

Sources

Peterson, Mary M. 2012. "Notes on Ten-edn (Tonga-Mos) and Kensiw Borrowings". Mon Khmer Studies, 40:19-35.

Benjamin, Geoffrey. 2012. "The Aslian languages of Malaysia and Thailand: an assessment". In Peter K. Austin & Stuart McGill (ed.), Language Documentation and Description, Vol. 11, London: Endangered Languages Project, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), pp. 136–230.<www.elpublishing.org/PID/131>.

External links