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Stanford Extended ASCII

Stanford Extended ASCII (SEASCII) is a derivation of the 7-bit ASCII character set developed at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (SAIL/SU-AI) in the early 1970s.[1] Not all symbols match ASCII.

Carnegie Mellon University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Southern California also had their own modified versions of ASCII.[1]

Character set

Each character is given with a potential Unicode equivalent. Differences to ASCII are shown boxed.

SEASCII[2][3][1]
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
0_
0
·/NUL
00B7/0000

2193
α
03B1
β
03B2
/^
2227/005E
¬
00AC
ε
03B5
π
03C0
λ
03BB
γ/HT
03B3/0009
δ/LF
03B4/000A
/VT
222B/000B
±/FF
00B1/000C
/CR
2295/000D

221E
//DEL
2202/2207
1_
16

2282

2283

2229

222A

2200

2203

2297

2194
_
005F

2192
~
007E

2260

2264

2265
/
2261/224D

2228
2_
32
SP
0020
!
0021
"
0022
#
0023
$
0024
%
0025
&
0026
'
0027
(
0028
)
0029
*
002A
+
002B
,
002C
-
002D
.
002E
/
002F
3_
48
0
0030
1
0031
2
0032
3
0033
4
0034
5
0035
6
0036
7
0037
8
0038
9
0039
:
003A
;
003B
<
003C
=
003D
>
003E
?
003F
4_
64
@
0040
A
0041
B
0042
C
0043
D
0044
E
0045
F
0046
G
0047
H
0048
I
0049
J
004A
K
004B
L
004C
M
004D
N
004E
O
004F
5_
80
P
0050
Q
0051
R
0052
S
0053
T
0054
U
0055
V
0056
W
0057
X
0058
Y
0059
Z
005A
[
005B
\
005C
]
005D

2191

2190
6_
96
`
0060
a
0061
b
0062
c
0063
d
0064
e
0065
f
0066
g
0067
h
0068
i
0069
j
006A
k
006B
l
006C
m
006D
n
006E
o
006F
7_
112
p
0070
q
0071
r
0072
s
0073
t
0074
u
0075
v
0076
w
0077
x
0078
y
0079
z
007A
{
007B
|
007C
/altmode/esc
25CA/001B
}
007D
^/rubout/del
005E/007F

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Beebe, Nelson H. F. (2005). "Proceedings of the Practical TEX 2005 Conference: The design of TEX and METAFONT: A retrospective" (PDF). TUGboat. Salt Lake City, Utah, USA: University of Utah, Department of Mathematics. 26 (1): 39-40. Retrieved 2017-03-07. The underscore operator in SAIL source-code assignments printed as a left arrow in the Stanford variant of ASCII, but PDP-10 sites elsewhere just saw it as a plain underscore. However, its use as the assignment operator meant that it could not be used as an extended letter to make compound names more readable, as is now common in many other programming languages. The left arrow in the Stanford variant of ASCII was not the only unusual character. (NB. Shows a table of Stanford extended ASCII following that described in RFC 698.)
  2. ^ Mock, T. (1975-07-23). "RFC 698: Telnet extended ASCII option". RFC 698. NIC #32964. Archived from the original on 2017-03-07. Retrieved 2017-03-07. [1] (NB. Replaced by RFC 5198.)
  3. ^ Cowan, John Woldemar (1999-09-08). "Stanford Extended ASCII to Unicode". 0.1. Unicode, Inc. Archived from the original on 2017-03-07. Retrieved 2017-03-07.

Further reading

External links