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Salanpur Area

Salanpur Area
Salanpur Area is located in West Bengal
Salanpur Area
Salanpur Area
Location in West Bengal
Salanpur Area is located in India
Salanpur Area
Salanpur Area
Salanpur Area (India)
Coordinates23°46′36″N 86°53′00″E / 23.7768°N 86.8832°E / 23.7768; 86.8832
Production
ProductsNon-coking coal
Owner
CompanyEastern Coalfields Limited
Website[www.easterncoal.gov.in]

Salanpur Area is one of the 14 operational areas of Eastern Coalfields Limited located in Asansol subdivision of Paschim Bardhaman district, in the state of West Bengal, India.

Geography

Collieries in Salanpur Area of Eastern Coalfields
U: Undergroud Colliery, O: Open Cast Colliery, N: Non-ECL Colliery, S: Mining support, A: Administrative headquarters, R: Rural centre
Owing to space constraints in the small map, the actual locations in a larger map may vary slightly

Location

Salanpur Area is located around 23°46′36″N 86°53′00″E / 23.7768°N 86.8832°E / 23.7768; 86.8832.

It is bounded by rural areas of Jamtara district of Jharkhand, across the Ajay, on the north, Sripur Area on the east, Sodepur Area on the south, and Mugma Area in Dhanbad district of Jharkhand, across the Barakar, on the west, Maithon Dam and reservoir is at the north-west corner of the Area.[1][2]

The map alongside shows some of the collieries in the Area. However, as the collieries do not have individual pages, there are no links in the full screen map.

Urbanisation

As per the 2011 census, 83.33% of the population of Asansol Sadar subdivision was urban and 16.67% was rural.[3] In 2015, the municipal areas of Kulti, Raniganj and Jamuria were included within the jurisdiction of Asansol Municipal Corporation.[4] Asansol Sadar subdivision has 26 (+1 partly) Census Towns.(partly presented in the map a little below; all places marked on the map are linked in the full-screen map).

Coal mining

Collieries in the Salanpur Area of Eastern Coalfields are: Dabor, Sagramgarh, Begunia, Khoirabad, Modarbahal, Barmondia, Chakballavpur, Sangramgarh OCP, Gourandi OCP, Bonjemehari OCP, Mohanpur OCP and Balmiya OCP.[5]

As per ECL website telephone numbers, operational collieries in the Salanpur Area in 2018 are: Bonjemehari Colliery, Barmondia Colliery, Dabor, Gourandi Colliery, Gourandi Begunia Colliery and Mohonpur OCP.[6]

Non-ECL collieries are outside the Salanpur Area and are included here because they operate in a contiguous area.


Cities, towns and ECL Areas in the western portion of Asansol Sadar subdivision in Paschim Bardhaman district
MC: municipal corporation, P: rural administrative unit, CT: census town, N: neighbourhood, OG: out growth, T:temple
Owing to space constraints in the small map, the actual locations in a larger map may vary slightly

Ramnagore Colliery, under the control of the Collieries Division of SAIL, is located in the southern part of the Salanpur Area.[7]

The Chanch Victoria Area of BCCL is spread over West Bengal and Jharkhand. The West Bengal part of the Chanch Victoria Area was located at the south-western edge of Salanpur Area. While collieries such as Damagoria and Borira are still in operation, other collieries such as Victoria and Victoria West have been closed.[8]

Private companies such as CESC also have mines in the region.[9][10]

Mining plan

An overview of the proposed mining activity plan in Cluster 3, a group of 3 mines in Salanpur Area, as of 2012, is as follows:[11]

1. Dabor underground mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.6 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.7 mt, had an expected life of over 25 years. Dabor phase I & II open cast mine, with normative annual production capacity of 2.0 mt and peak annual production capacity of 2.7 mt, had an expected life of 10 years.
2. Bonjemehari UG mine, with normative and peak annual production capacity of 0.07 mt, had an expected life of over 25 years. Bonjemehari OC mine had an expected life of 4 years.
3. Sangramgarh UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.05 mt and peak annual production capacity of 0.08 mt, had an expected life of over 25 years. Sangramgarh OC mine had an expected life of 4 years.

Operational Areas of ECL (Source:ENVIS Centre on Environmental Problems of Mining)

An overview of the proposed mining activity plan in Cluster 4, a group of 3 mines in Salanpur Area, as of 2015, is as follows:[12]

1. Khoirabad underground mine has no UG potential left. Coal at the in-crop is left which can be extracted by opencast only. The proposed OC mine had an expected life of 4 years.
2. Gaurandih UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.05 mt and peak annual production capacity of 0.08 mt, had an expected life of over 50 years. Gaurandih OC patch had an expected life of 5 years. Gaurandih Begunia OC mine, with normative annual production capacity of 1.8 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 2.0 mt, had an expected life of 7 years.
3. Itapara OC project (a new proposal), with normative annual production capacity of 0.4 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.5 mt, had an expected life of 26 years,

An overview of the proposed mining activity plan in Cluster 7, a group of 4 mines in Salanpur and Sripur Area, as of 2015–16, is as follows:[13]

1. Barmondia UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.020 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.030 mt, had an expected life of more than 10 years. As of 2015–16, there was no production from the mine.
2. Chakballavpur UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.030 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.040 mt, had an expected life of more than 10 years. Lower Dhadka seam (R-VII) was being worked in the mine.
3. Manoharbahal UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.030 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.040 mt, had an expected life of more than 10 years. As of 2015–16, there was no production from the mine.
4. Bhanora West UG mine, with normative annual production capacity of 0.10 million tonnes and peak annual production capacity of 0.13 mt, had an expected life of more than 20 years. Bhanora West OC patch had an expected life of 3.5 years. Sripur (R-VI) seam, with gradient varying from 1 in 5.5 to 1 in 7 and degree II gassiness, is being worked.

Illegal coal mining

India is the third largest coal producer in the world. Mining is a highly organized industry, but there are gaps and loopholes. Beyond, or rather underneath, the well-organised industry, there is a large sector described as illegal mining. According to Haradhan Roy, the veteran political leader and trade unionist, about a million tonnes of coal are produced by illegal collieries in Raniganj alone. The total annual national production from such mines in India is not less than 20 million tonnes. In 2001 there were at least 33 identified sites of unauthorized mining in Raniganj. Of these many were in Salanpur, Sripur, Satgram and Sodepur Areas. Seven are outside ECL's lease-hold land. However, apart from the identified areas, such activities are spread across the entire region.[14]

Systematic mining and movement of coal by the railways, started in the mid-nineteenth century in the Raniganj Coalfields, led by Carr, Tagore and Company.[15][16] The conventional "board and pillar" system was used in Indian underground collieries. In this system coal pillars are left behind to support the roof and the vacant space was not always filled with sand. ECL leaves a mine as soon as it is ‘uneconomic’, leaving the remaining coal for others to scavenge upon.[14] There are around 1,380 abandoned pits and inclines of ECL in the region.[17]

The veteran CITU leader, Sunil Basu Roy, described the workers of the illegal mines as "the wretched on the earth" – they have no where else to go and no other means of survival. In Gourandi village, near Asansol, around 5,000 people work in shifts in an open cast mine. Work in such mines are labour-intensive and machines are unknown. The poor who rush into such jobs come from all segments of society, the adivasi and other locals and migrants. They are quite often in the news when accidents occur.[14]

Subsidence

Traditionally many underground collieries have left a void after taking out the coal. As a result, almost all areas are facing subsidence. As per CMPDIL, there were 3 points of subsidence in the Salanpur Area involving 6.38 hectares of land.[18]

Migrants

Prior to the advent of coal mining, the entire region was a low-productive rice crop area in what was once a part of the Jungle Mahals. The ownership of land had passed on from local adivasis to agricultural castes before mining started. However, the Santhals and the Bauris, referred to by the colonial administrators as "traditional coal cutters of Raniganj" remained attached to their lost land and left the mines for agricultural related work, which also was more remunerative. It forced the mine-owners to bring in outside labour, mostly from Bihar, Odisha and Uttar Pradesh. In time the migrants dominated the mining and industrial scenario. The pauperization and alienation of the adivasis have been major points of social concern.[14][19]

Transport

The Asansol–Patna section, which is a part of Howrah-Delhi main line passes through the Salanpur Area.[20] State Highway 5 (West Bengal) running from Rupnarayanpur (in Bardhaman district) to Junput (in Purba Medinipur district) originates from this block.[21]

Asansol-Chittaranjan road links to both NH 19 and Grand Trunk Road and thereafter it links to Jamtara in Jharkhand and from there to places such as Dumka and Karmatanr.[1]

Healthcare

Salanpur Hospital of ECL functions with 50 beds.[22]

See also

Chanch/ Victoria Area of BCCL functioning in the same region.

References

  1. ^ a b Google maps
  2. ^ "ECL Area Map". ENVIS Centre on Environmental Problems of Mining. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  3. ^ "District Statistical Handbook 2014 Burdwan". Table 2.2, 2.4(a). Department of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Notification No. 335/MA/O/C-4/1M-36/2014 dated 3 June 2015" (PDF). The Kolkata Gazette. Department of Municipal Affairs, Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  5. ^ "Coalmining impact on the Environment" (PDF). Chapter V: Table 5.2. shodganga.infibnet. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Area-wise Closed User Group (CUG) Telephone Numbers" (PDF). Salanpurr Area. Eastern Coalfields Limited. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  7. ^ "Collieries Division". Steel Authority of India Limited. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Chanch Victoria Area". Overview. Bharat Coking Coal Limited. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  9. ^ Sambit Saha (16 February 2015). "CESC retains Sarisatolli". The Telegraph. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  10. ^ Indrani Dutta. "CESC gets back Sarisatoli mine". The Hindu, 17 February 2015. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  11. ^ "Revised application for TOR for Cluster No.3 Group of Mines" (PDF). 2012. Ministry of Environment and Forests. Retrieved 19 August 2018.
  12. ^ "Cluster No.4 (3 Mines)" (PDF). 2015. Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change. Retrieved 19 August 2018.
  13. ^ "Environmental Statement for Cluster 7 Group of Mines" (PDF). 2015–16. Central Mine Planning and Design Institute. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  14. ^ a b c d Lahiri-Dutt, Kuntala (2003). "Unintended Collieries: People and Resources in Eastern India". Resource Management in Asia-Pacific, Working Paper No. 44. RMAP Working Papers. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  15. ^ Akkori Chattopadhyay, Bardhaman Jelar Itihas O Lok Sanskriti, in Bengali, Vol I, pp. 46-51, Radical, 2001, ISBN 81-85459-36-3
  16. ^ Vikram Doctor, Editor, Special Features (20 September 2012). "Coal Dust in the Tagore Album". The Economic Times. Blogs. Retrieved 2 August 2018.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  17. ^ "The 'rat-holes' of Ranigunj". Frontline. November 4 – December 7, 2001. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  18. ^ "Coal mining impact on the environment" (PDF). Shodhganga. pp. 78–81. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  19. ^ Basu, Nirban (2012–13). "Industrialisation and Emergence of Labour Force in Bengal during The Colonial Period: Its Socio-Economic Impact" (PDF). Vidyasagar University Journal of History. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  20. ^ "18181 Tatanagar-Chhapra Express". Time Table. indiarailinfo. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  21. ^ "List of State Highways in West Bengal". West Bengal Traffic Police. Retrieved 11 August 2018.
  22. ^ "Eastern Coalfields Limited's Hospitals" (PDF). Government of West Bengal. Retrieved 18 August 2018.