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Rohri–Chaman Line

Rohri–Chaman Railway Line
روہڑی–چمن مرکزی راه آهن خط
Overview
Other name(s)Main Line 3
ML-3[1]
TerminiRohri Junction
Chaman
Stations184
Line number3
Operation
Opened6 October 1879 (1879-10-06)
OwnerPakistan Railways
Operator(s)Pakistan Railways
Technical
Line length523 km (325 mi)
Track gauge1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
Operating speed105 km/h (65 mph) (Current)
160 km/h (99 mph) (Proposed)[2]
Route map

km
0
Rohri Junction
5
Sukkur
11
Arian Road
18
Gosarji
33
Habib Kot Junction
43
Shikarpur
57
Sultankot
72
Abad
84
Jacobabad Junction
97
Dera Allah Yar
101
Mangoli
121
Dera Murad Jamali
148
Nuttall
175
Bakhtiarabad Domki
187
Damboli
210
Dingra
231
Perak
240
Sibi
257
Mushkaf
266
Pehro Kunri
281
Panir
290
Peshi
303
Aab-e-Gum
315
Mach
329
Hirok
333
Dozan
341
Kolpur
357
Spezand Junction
371
Sar-i-Ab
381
Quetta
389
Sheikh Mandah
393
Beleli
404
Kuchlak
414
Bostan
427
Yaru
463
Gulistan
477
Qilla Abdullah
493
Shela Bagh
523
Chaman

Rohri–Chaman Railway Line (Urdu: روہڑی–چمن مرکزی راه آهن خط‎) (also referred to as Main Line 3 or ML-3) is one of four main railway lines in Pakistan, operated and maintained by Pakistan Railways. The line begins from Rohri Junction station and ends at Chaman station. The total length of this railway line is 523 kilometers (325 mi). There are 35 railway stations from Rohri Junction to Chaman on this line and is famous for passing through the historic Bolan pass.[3] This line incorporates part of the historic Sind–Pishin State Railway.

History

Originally named the Sind–Pishin State Railway, this strategic railway line was constructed by the Scinde, Punjab & Delhi Railway. Construction began in 1879 and was completed in 1887, which by then was part of the North Western State Railway. Quetta was always considered as an important strategic destination by the British Raj, as they feared the Russian Empire could advance from Afghanistan into Quetta, thereby threatening its rule in South Asia.[4] On 6 October 1879, work on the first section from Ruk (now Rohri) to Sibi (at the entrance of the Nari Pass) and was completed by 14 January 1880. The track had been laid in 101 days across the water less desert by 5000 men and their animals. In 1880, orders were issued for the line to be extended from Sibi to Quetta and onward to Pishin via the Harnai Pass and would become known as the Kandahar State Railway. It was initially thought that the Harnai pass was more suitable for broad gauge than the Bolan Pass. In 1883, construction began in secret and known in public as the "Harnai Road Improvement Scheme". From Sibi, the line ran southwest, skirting the hills to Rindli and originally followed the course of the Bolan stream to its head on the plateau. By February 1884, the line had only reached Zardalu. The tough terrain as well as the destructive action of floods led to the abandonment of this alignment. A new extension was thus proposed from Sibi through the Mashkaf Valley and Bolan Pass to Quetta and onward to Chaman in 1885. The line reached Quetta in March 1887, and reached Chaman in January 1892. The section between Khojak and Chaman required the construction of the longest railway tunnel in the North Western State Railway system.

Stations

The stations on this line are as follows:

See also

References

  1. ^ Amer Sial (August 17, 2016). "Pak Railways poised to get massive funding from CPEC and CAREC". Pakistan Today. Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  2. ^ Pakistan Railways: A Performance Analysis - Citizens’ Periodic Reports on the Performance of State Institutions (PDF). Islamabad: PILDAT. December 2015. p. 21. ISBN 978-969-558-589-4. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 24, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  3. ^ Pakistan Railways Time & Fare Table 2015 (PDF) (in English and Urdu) (October 2015 ed.). Pakistan: National Book Foundation. pp. 94–99. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 18, 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  4. ^ Wikipedia "History of rail transport in Pakistan"; Retrieved 13 Dec 2015