This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

Portal:Anime and manga

Anime and manga portal

Introduction

Wikipe-tan sailor fuku.png

Anime (アニメ) refers to the animation style originating in Japan. It is characterized by distinctive characters and backgrounds (hand-drawn or computer-generated) that visually and thematically set it apart from other forms of animation. Storylines may include a variety of fictional or historical characters, events, and settings. Anime is aimed at a broad range of audiences and consequently, a given series may have aspects of a range of genres. Anime is most frequently broadcast on television or sold on DVDs and other media, either after their broadcast run or directly as original video animation (OVA). Console and computer games sometimes also feature segments or scenes that can be considered anime.

Manga (漫画) is Japanese for "comics" or "whimsical images". Manga developed from a mixture of ukiyo-e and Western styles of drawing, and took its current form shortly after World War II. Manga, apart from covers, is usually published in black and white but it is common to find introductions to chapters to be in color, and is read from top to bottom and then right to left, similar to the layout of a Japanese plain text. Financially, manga represented in 2005 a market of ¥24 billion in Japan and one of $180 million in the United States. Manga was the fastest growing segment of books in the United States in 2005.

Anime and manga share many characteristics, including: exaggerating (in terms of scale) of physical features, to which the reader presumably should pay most attention (best known being "large eyes"), "dramatically shaped speech bubbles, speed lines and onomatopoeic, exclamatory typography..." Some manga, a small amount of the total output, is adapted into anime, often with the collaboration of the original author. Computer games can also give rise to anime. In such cases, the stories are often compressed and modified to fit the format and appeal to a wider market. Popular anime franchises sometimes include full-length feature films, and some have been adapted into live-action films and television programs.

Featured article

Tokyo Mew Mew, also known as Mew Mew Power, is a Japanese shōjo manga series written by Reiko Yoshida and illustrated by Mia Ikumi. It was originally serialized in Nakayoshi from September 2000 to February 2003, and later published in seven tankōbon volumes by Kodansha from April 2003 to May 2004. It focuses on five girls infused with the DNA of rare animals that gives them special powers and allows them to transform into "Mew Mews". Led by Ichigo Momomiya, the girls protect the earth from aliens who wish to "reclaim" it.

The series was quickly adapted into a fifty-two episode anime series by Studio Pierrot. It debuted in Japan on April 6, 2002, on both TV Aichi and TV Tokyo; the final episode aired on March 29, 2003. A two-volume sequel to the manga, Tokyo Mew Mew a la Mode, was serialized in Nakayoshi from April 2003 to February 2004. The sequel introduces a new Mew Mew, Berry Shirayuki, who becomes the temporary leader of the Mew Mews whilst Ichigo is on a trip to England. Two video games were also created for the series: a puzzle adventure game for the Game Boy Advance system and a role-playing video game for the PlayStation.

Featured biography

Mamoru Miyano
Mamoru Miyano (宮野真守), born June 8, 1983, is a Japanese seiyū, actor, and singer from Saitama. He is best known for Death Note, Mobile Suit Gundam 00, and Kōtetsu Sangokushi. At the 2007 Seiyu Awards he was nominated for two awards for his role as Light Yagami in Death Note, and in 2008, he won the "Best Voice Actor" award at the 2008 Tokyo International Anime Fair. At the 2008 Seiyu Awards, Miyano won "Best Lead Actor Award" for his role as Setsuna F Seiei in Mobile Suit Gundam 00, and as Hakugen Rikuson in Kōtetsu Sangokushi.

Miyano began his career as a musician in 2007. Under the King Records label he released his debut single, "Kuon" (久遠, lit. Eternity), in May. In March 2009, his debut album Break was released. Miyano was married in late 2008; he and his wife have a son together.

Featured list

The episodes of the anime Gunslinger Girl were directed by Morio Asaka, animated by Madhouse Studios, and produced by Bandai Visual, Marvelous Entertainment, MediaWorks, and Madhouse Studios. This anime series is based on the first two manga volumes of the Gunslinger Girl manga series that was written and illustrated by Yu Aida. The thirteen episodes of the anime series was aired in Japan from October 8, 2003 to February 19, 2004 on Bandai Channel and Fuji Television. Set in contemporary Italy, the series tells about young girls who are turned into cyborgs, trained as assassins by adult male "handlers" and their missions against terrorists and gangsters on behalf of a secretive government agency.

A sequel to the first anime series, called Gunslinger Girl -Il Teatrino-, was directed by Hiroshi Ishiodori and animated by Artland. The sequel aired in Japan on Tokyo MX TV from January 7, 2008 to March 31, 2008. It adapts the third, fourth and fifth volumes of the manga over fifteen episodes, with the first thirteen episodes airing on television and the final two released directly to DVD.

Selected image

Mahuri, an anime character
Credit: Niabot

Drawing of an anime character named "Mahuri". It combines design elements of Mahoro from Mahoromatic and Haruhi Suzumiya (character) from Suzumiya Haruhi no Yūutsu.

ArchivesRead more...

On this day...

Did you know

Wikiprojects

Related portals

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Purge page cache