This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

North Tawton railway station

North Tawton
North Tawton railway station, Devon, 1969.jpg
North Tawton station in 1969
Location
PlaceNorth Tawton
AreaWest Devon
Operations
Original companyDevon and Cornwall Railway
Pre-groupingLondon and South Western Railway
Post-groupingSouthern Railway
Platforms2
History
1865Opened
5 June 1972Closed to passengers
Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom
Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z
Dartmoor Railway
miles
0
Crediton
through services on summer Sundays
Salmon Pool level crossing
Yeoford
served by Tarka Line trains only
Coleford Junction
8½ 
Bow
11¾ 
North Tawton
14½ 
Sampford Courtenay
18¼ 
Okehampton
20¼ 
Meldon Viaduct/
Meldon Quarry
to Padstow and Bude

North Tawton railway station was a railway station serving the town of North Tawton in Devon, England. North Tawton lies on the River Taw.

History

North Tawton station in 1970.

The station was originally opened by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) in 1865.[1] Services on the line were extended further west to Okehampton Road by 1867 and then on to Lydford railway station with the inauguration of Meldon Viaduct in 1874. Constructed to rival the South Devon Railway route to Plymouth, the completion of the LSWR's own route to Plymouth saw this line become an important route with lines to Padstow and Bude as well as Plymouth.[citation needed] Boat trains carrying passengers from ocean liners calling at Stonehouse Pool, Plymouth and prestige services such as the Atlantic Coast Express and Devon Belle all used the route.[citation needed]

Following the publication of the Beeching Report in 1963, the Exeter to Plymouth Line was cut back to Okehampton in 1968.

North Tawton, Bow, Sampford Courtenay and Okehampton lost their regular passenger services from 1972. The line survived, however, for the purposes of freight thanks to the activities of the British Rail ballast quarry at Meldon, three miles from Okehampton, which had an output of 300,000 tons per year. The quarry survives to this day, although it is now operated by Aggregate Industries.[citation needed]

Future options

The Dartmoor Railway is proposing to restore the interchange at Yeoford, running passenger trains past North Tawton, where its line meets First Great Western's Tarka Line[citation needed].

British American Railway Services, a new company created by Iowa Pacific Holdings of Chicago, became the new owner of the Dartmoor line on 4 September 2008. The company will develop freight, passenger and tourist services on the railway.[2]

References

  1. ^ Nock, O. S. (1965). The London & South Western Railway. London: Ian Allan. p. 48. ISBN 978-0711002678.
  2. ^ Heritage Railway, Heritage Railway Magazine. Issue 116, 2–29 October 2008, p. 18.

External links