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Morioka Station

Morioka Station

盛岡駅
Morioka jr.jpg
Morioka Station east entrance in May 2006
Location1-48 Moriokaekimae-dori, Morioka-shi, Iwate-ken
Japan
Coordinates39°42′05″N 141°08′11″E / 39.701442°N 141.136379°E / 39.701442; 141.136379
Operated by
Line(s)
Distance535.3 km from Tokyo
Platforms7 island platforms
ConnectionsBus terminal
Construction
Structure typeElevated
Other information
StatusStaffed (Midori no Madoguchi)
History
OpenedNovember 1, 1890
Traffic
Passengers (FY2015)
  • JR East 17,784 (daily)
  • IGR 3,257 (daily)
Location
Morioka Station is located in Japan
Morioka Station
Morioka Station
Location within Japan

Morioka Station (盛岡駅, Morioka-eki) is a railway station in the city Morioka, Iwate Prefecture, Japan operated by JR East.

Lines

Morioka Station is a major junction station, and is served by both the Tōhoku Shinkansen and the Akita Shinkansen. It is located 535.3 km from Tokyo Station. Local JR East services are provided by the Tohoku Main Line, Tazawako Line and Yamada Line, all of which terminate at Morioka Station. The station is also the southern terminus of the third-sector Iwate Ginga Railway Line.

Station layout

The station has three elevated island platforms for Shinkansen services, and four island platforms for local services. The station has a Midori no Madoguchi staffed ticket office.

Platforms

0/1  Iwate Ginga Railway Line for Iwate-Numakunai and Ninohe
   Hanawa Line for Araya-Shinmachi and Kazuno-Hanawa
2  Tōhoku Main Line for Hanamaki, Kitakami and Ichinoseki
   Yamada Line for Moichi and Miyako
   Iwate Ginga Railway Line for Iwate-Numakunai (JR Line through operation
3  Tōhoku Main Line for Hanamaki, Kitakami and Ichinoseki
   Iwate Ginga Railway Line for Iwate-Numakunai (JR Line through operation
4/5  Tōhoku Main Line for Hanamaki, Kitakami and Ichinoseki
6  Tōhoku Main Line for Hanamaki, Kitakami and Ichinoseki
   Yamada Line for Moichi and Miyako
7  Tōhoku Main Line for Hanamaki, Kitakami and Ichinoseki
8/9  Tazawako Line for Shizukuishi and Ōmagari
11  Tohoku Shinkansen for Sendai and Tokyo
12/13  Tohoku Shinkansen for Sendai and Tokyo (Departure)
14  Tohoku Shinkansen for Ninohe, Hachinohe, Shin-Aomori and Shin-Hakodate-Hokuto
   Akita Shinkansen for Ōmagari and Akita

Adjacent stations

« Service »
Tohoku Shinkansen
Sendai, Ichinoseki,
Kitakami, or Shin-Hanamaki
Hayabusa
Hayate
Iwate-Numakunai, Ninohe,
Hachinohe or Shin-Aomori
Shin-Hanamaki Yamabiko Terminus
Akita Shinkansen
Through to Tohoku Shinkansen Komachi Shizukuishi
Tazawako
Tohoku Main Line
Senbokuchō - Terminus
Yamada Line
Terminus - Kamimorioka
Tazawako Line
Terminus - Ōkama
Iwate Galaxy Railway Line
Terminus - Aoyama
Hanawa Line
Terminus - Aoyama

History

The station was opened on November 1, 1890, by Japan's first private railway company, Nippon Railway. The line was nationalized in 1906. Services on the Tazawako Line started in 1921, on the Yamada line in 1923, the Tohoku Shinkansen in 1982 and the Akita Shinkansen in 1997. The station was absorbed into the JR East network upon the privatization of the Japanese National Railways (JNR) on 1 April 1987.

Passenger statistics

In fiscal 2015, the JR East portion of the station was used by an average of 17,784 passengers daily (boarding passengers only).[1]The Iwate Ginga Railway portion of the station was used by an average of 3,257 passengers daily.[2]

Surrounding area

East exit

  • Morioka Station building "Fezan"
  • Moriokaekimae Post office
  • JR East Morioka branch office
  • JR bus Tōhoku Morioka branch office

West exit

  • Iwate Asahi Television Co., Ltd.

Connecting bus routes

Local

Long-distance (Highway bus)

Departs from the west exit
Departs from the east exit

See also

References

  1. ^ 各駅の乗車人員 (2015年度) [Station passenger figures (Fiscal 2015)] (in Japanese). Japan: East Japan Railway Company. 2016. Retrieved 11 December 2016.
  2. ^ 平成27年度 駅別乗降人員(1日平均) [Fiscal 2015 Station passenger figures (daily average)] (PDF) (in Japanese). Japan: Iwate Galaxy Railway Company. 2016. Retrieved 1 March 2017.

External links