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List of world champion football clubs

This list includes the world champion football clubs (de jure) for FIFA; the official competitions are organized by FIFA or affiliated federations (for FIFA statute). The two competitions considered for this achievement are the Intercontinental Cup (defunct) and the FIFA Club World Cup.[1]

Competitions

  • The FIFA Club World Cup is an international men's association football competition organised by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The tournament officially assigns the world title.[2][3] The competition was first contested in 2000 as the FIFA Club World Championship. It was not held between 2001 and 2004 due to a combination of factors, most importantly the collapse of FIFA's marketing partner International Sport and Leisure.[4] Since 2005, the competition has been held every year, and has been hosted by Brazil, Japan, the United Arab Emirates and Morocco. The FIFA Club World Cup's prestige is perceived quite differently in different parts of the football world; while it is widely regarded as the most distinguished club level trophy in South America,[5][6] it struggles to attract interest in most of Europe compared to the UEFA Champions League and commonly lacks recognition as a high-ranking contest.[7][8]
The first FIFA Club World Championship took place in Brazil in 2000. It ran in parallel with the Intercontinental Cup (also known as European/South American Cup), a competition organised jointly by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) and the Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (CONMEBOL) first disputed in 1960 by the winners of the European Champions' Cup and the Copa Libertadores. In 2005, after the Intercontinental Cup's last edition, that competition was merged with the Club World Cup's pilot edition and renamed the "FIFA Club World Championship". In 2006, the tournament took its current name. As required by the regulations, a representative from FIFA present the winner of the World Cup with the FIFA Club World Cup trophy and with a FIFA World Champions certificate.[9]
The current format of the tournament involves seven teams competing for the title at venues within the host nation over a period of about two weeks; the winners of that year's AFC Champions League (Asia), CAF Champions League (Africa), CONCACAF Champions League (North America), Copa Libertadores (South America), OFC Champions League (Oceania) and UEFA Champions League (Europe), along with the host nation's national champions, participate in a straight knock-out tournament. The host nation's national champions dispute a play-off against the Oceania champions, from which the winner joins the champions of Asia, Africa and North America at the quarter-finals. The quarter-final winners go on to face the European and South American champions, who enter at the semi-final stage, for a place in the final.
From its formation in 1960 to 1979, the competition was contested over a two legged tie, with a playoff if necessary until 1968, and penalty kicks later. During the 1970s, European participation in the Intercontinental Cup became a running question due to controversial events in the 1969 final,[15] and some European Champions Club' winner teams withdrew.[16] From 1980 until 2004, the competition was contested over a single match held in Japan and sponsored by multinational automaker Toyota, which offered a secondary trophy, the Toyota Cup.[17]
Despite being chronologically the fourth international competitions created to define "the best club team in the world" – such as the Lipton Trophy, the Copa Rio and Pequeña Copa del Mundo - due to FIFA's lack of interest or inability to organize club competitions,[18] – the Intercontinental Cup is considered by FIFA as the predecessor[19] to the FIFA Club World Cup, which was held for the first time in 2000.[20]
All the winning teams were regarded by worldwide mass media and football's community as "world champions" de facto[21][22][23] since 2017 when FIFA officially (de jure) recognized all of them as club world champions with the same status to the FIFA Club World Cup winners.[24][3][25][26][27][28][29]

Winners

By club

In accordance to what is officially communicated by FIFA, the total count of world titles is as follows:[30][31][32][33][34][3][35]

Key
IC Intercontinental Cup (defunct)
FCWC FIFA Club World Cup
List of world champion football clubs
Club Country IC FCWC Total
Real Madrid  Spain 3 3 6
Milan  Italy 3 1 4
Peñarol  Uruguay 3 0 3
Nacional  Uruguay 3 0 3
Boca Juniors  Argentina 3 0 3
São Paulo  Brazil 2 1 3
Internazionale  Italy 2 1 3
Bayern Munich  Germany 2 1 3
Barcelona  Spain 0 3 3
Santos  Brazil 2 0 2
Independiente  Argentina 2 0 2
Ajax  Netherlands 2 0 2
Juventus  Italy 2 0 2
Porto  Portugal 2 0 2
Manchester United  England 1 1 2
Corinthians  Brazil 0 2 2
Racing Club  Argentina 1 0 1
Estudiantes  Argentina 1 0 1
Feyenoord  Netherlands 1 0 1
Atlético Madrid  Spain 1 0 1
Olimpia  Paraguay 1 0 1
Flamengo  Brazil 1 0 1
Grêmio  Brazil 1 0 1
River Plate  Argentina 1 0 1
Red Star  Yugoslavia 1 0 1
Vélez Sarsfield  Argentina 1 0 1
Borussia Dortmund  Germany 1 0 1
Internacional  Brazil 0 1 1

By country [a]

Country IC FCWC Total
 Brazil 6 4 10
 Spain 4 6 10
 Argentina 9 0 9
 Italy 7 2 9
 Uruguay 6 0 6
 Germany 3 1 4
 Netherlands 3 0 3
 Portugal 2 0 2
 England 1 1 2
 Paraguay 1 0 1
 Yugoslavia+ 1 0 1

+ = National federation no longer exists.

By confederation

Confederation IC FCWC Total
UEFA 21 10 31
CONMEBOL 22 4 26

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The records of clubs from currently non-existing associations such as Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, East Germany and Yugoslavia are attributed to those federations, since the corresponding titles were won when the clubs were affiliated to those associations.

References

  1. ^ "FIFA Statute" (PDF). FIFA Statute. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association: 5, 17, 18, 19. May 2013.
  2. ^ "FIFA Club World Championship TOYOTA Cup Japan 2005: Report and Statistics" (PDF). pp. 5, 19.
  3. ^ a b c "FIFA Club World Cup UAE 2017: Statistical Kit FIFA" (PDF). pp. 15, 40, 41, 42.
  4. ^ "FIFA decides to postpone 2001 Club World Championship to 2003". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 18 May 2001. Retrieved 26 August 2014.
  5. ^ "Ignored in Europe, Club World Cup finds adulation in S.America". Times of Oman. 14 December 2015. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  6. ^ Tim Vickery (15 December 2008). "The prestige of the Club World Cup". BBC. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  7. ^ Peter Staunton (12 December 2014). "Why does the Club World Cup still struggle for relevance?". goal.com. Retrieved 24 December 2015.
  8. ^ Tim Vickery (13 December 2010). "World Club Cup deserves respect". BBC. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  9. ^ "Regulations - FIFA Club World Cup 2017" (PDF). p. 37.
  10. ^ "Legend – UEFA club competition" (PDF). Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 2009. p. 99. Retrieved 23 August 2014.
  11. ^ "Competencias oficiales de la CONMEBOL". Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (in Spanish). 2011. pp. 99, 107. Retrieved 23 August 2014.
  12. ^ "Real Madrid CF". UEFA.com.
  13. ^ Carluccio, Jose (2 September 2007). "¿Qué es la Copa Libertadores de América?" [What is the Copa Libertadore de América?] (in Spanish). Historia y Fútbol. Retrieved 18 May 2010.
  14. ^ "Goodbye Toyota Cup, hello FIFA Club World Championship" (Press release). fifa.com. December 2004.
  15. ^ "1969: Milan prevail in tough contest". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. October 22, 1969. Archived from the original on December 26, 2015. Retrieved November 21, 2012.
  16. ^ Risolo, Don (2010). Soccer Stories: Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore, and Amazing Feats p.109. U of Nebraska Press. Retrieved 29 February 2012.
  17. ^ "FIFA Club World Cup 2012 - Statistical Kit" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 6 November 2012. p. 9. Retrieved 21 November 2012.
  18. ^ "50 years of the European Cup" (PDF). Union des Associations Européennes de Football. October 2004. pp. 7–9. Retrieved 15 December 2011.
  19. ^ "FIFA Club World Championship TOYOTA Cup: Solidarity – the name of the game" (PDF). FIFA Activity Report 2005. Zurich: Fédération Internationale de Football Association: 62. April 2004 – May 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 11, 2012. Retrieved December 17, 2012.
  20. ^ "FIFA Club World Championship to replace Toyota Cup from 2005". Fédération Internationale de Football Association. May 17, 2004. Archived from the original on April 30, 2011. Retrieved December 24, 2010.
  21. ^ "Milan thrive on world stage". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 4 December 2003. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  22. ^ "Ronaldo treble fires Madrid to Club World Cup glory". Union des Associations Européennes de Football. 18 December 2016. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  23. ^ Fédération Internationale de Football Association, ed. (18 December 2015). "Japan Aiming High" (PDF). The FIFA Weekly. No. 50. pp. 8–9. OCLC 862248672. Retrieved 30 January 2017.
  24. ^ "FIFA Council approves key organisational elements of the FIFA World Cup/ Recognition of all European and South American teams that won the Intercontinental Cup – played between 1960 and 2004 – as club world champions". Fifa.com.
  25. ^ "Manchester United recognised as two-time world club champions following FIFA ruling". Mirror.co.uk.
  26. ^ "Real Madrid are the most successful club across the history of the two competitions, with a total of five victories (2016)". Espn.co.uk.
  27. ^ "Real Madrid! Sixth Club World Cup!". Realmadrid.com.
  28. ^ "Historical decision, register Club World Cup is rewritten". Foxsports.it (in Italian).
  29. ^ "La FIFA reconoció a los ganadores de la Intercontinental como campeones mundiales". Goal.com (in Spanish; with documents.).
  30. ^ "Manchester United recognised as two-time world club champions following FIFA ruling". Mirror.co.uk.
  31. ^ "Real Madrid are the most successful club across the history of the two competitions, with a total of five victories (2016)". Espn.co.uk.
  32. ^ "Real Madrid! Sixth Club World Cup!". Realmadrid.com.
  33. ^ "Historical decision, register Club World Cup is rewritten". Foxsports.it (in Italian).
  34. ^ "La FIFA reconoció a los ganadores de la Intercontinental como campeones mundiales". Goal.com (in Spanish; with documents.).
  35. ^ "FIFA Council approves key organisational elements of the FIFA World Cup/ Recognition of all European and South American teams that won the Intercontinental Cup – played between 1960 and 2004 – as club world champions". Fifa.com.