This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

List of unreleased songs recorded by the Beach Boys

The Beach Boys have been known to perform and/or record a number of songs, instrumentals, and early versions of compositions which have never been officially released on a single, album, or compilation. Only those whose existence can be reliably confirmed are listed here. Some bootleg recordings of the below listed songs are in circulation while other recordings have been lost and unheard of since their creation.

This list is ordered by recording date. It does not include the innumerably non-substantial rehearsal tapes, instrumental tracking, and session chatter recorded by the group.

Contents

Formerly unreleased songs

The following is a list of studio outtakes and live recordings that later appeared on Beach Boys compilation albums. It is adapted from Andrew Doe,[1] except where otherwise noted.

1962–1965

"Beginning of the End"

Brian Wilson, Roger Christian, and Gary Usher song recorded on April 16, 1962.[2]

"My Only Alibi"

Brian Wilson and Gary Usher song recorded on April 16, 1962. Also known as "Human".[2]

"One Way Road to Love"

Brian Wilson and Gary Usher song recorded on April 16, 1962.[2]

"Visions"

Brian Wilson and Gary Usher song recorded on April 16, 1962. Also known as "Number One".[2]

"Recreation"

Brain Wilson, Bob Norberg, and Pomeroy[who?] song recorded in 1962.[2]

"Ride Away"

Brian Wilson song recorded on January 18, 1963. No vocal was recorded.[2]

"Pink Champagne"

Al Jardine instrumental recorded in February 1963.[2]

"Chopsticks Boogie"

Brian Wilson and Jan Berry song recorded in spring 1963.[2]

"Rockin' Roadster"

Brian Wilson and Roger Christian song recorded in the summer of 1963.[2]

"Malibu Sunset'

Brian Wilson, Gary Usher, and Roger Christian song recorded in mid 1963.[2]

"Hot Harp"

Brian Wilson instrumental recorded on August 5, 1963.[2]

"Witch Stand"

Brian Wilson song produced for singer Dave Nowlen on August 5, 1963.[2]

"Girlie"

Brian Wilson song recorded on August 5, 1963.[2]

"A Joy Ride Cruise"

Brian Wilson song recorded in August 1963.[2]

"Boys Will Be Boys"

Brian Wilson song recorded in January 1964. No vocals.[2]

"What'll I Wear to School Today?"

Brian Wilson song recorded in January 1964.[2]

Pet Sounds and Smile era (1965–67)

"How Deep Is the Ocean?"

Cover of Irving Berlin song recorded on October 15, 1965.[2]

"Stella by Starlight"

Cover of Washington/Young song recorded on October 15, 1965. Instrumental.[2]

"Crack the Whip"

Brian Wilson song recorded in spring 1967 with lead vocals by Jasper Dailey.[2]

"When I Get Mad (I Just Play My Drums)"

Brian Wilson song recorded in spring 1967 with lead vocal by Jasper Dailey.[2]

"On Top of Old Smoky"

Traditional song recorded on April 11, 1967. May feature Brian and Paul McCartney on lead vocals.[2]

Bedroom Tapes (1967–68)

"Good Time Mama"

Uncertain if Brian Wilson song; recorded June 25–26, 1967.[2]

"Sunflower Maiden"

Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks song written for the band Three Dog Night in tandem with "Darlin'" and "Time to Get Alone". As of 2006, the recording remains lost.[3]

"Tale of Man"

Dennis Wilson and Stephen Kalinich song; recorded/written on 1968.[2]

Bedroom Tapes (1969–70)

"What Can the Matter Be'

Unknown song recorded on February 24 and May 24, 1969.[2]

"I'm Going Your Way"

Dennis Wilson song recorded on July 14, 1969 with lead vocal by him. Also known as "California Slide".[2]

"Raspberries, Strawberries"

Cover of The Kingston Trio song recorded November 11, 1969.[2]

"Symphony of Frogs"

Unheard; only the title is known.[4]

"You Never Give Me Your Money"

Impromptu cover of the Beatles' song recorded on January 7, 1970[2] during a session for "Good Time".[5]

"Over The Waves"

Instrumental recorded December 1969, January 5, 1970 and January 9, 1970. Later constructed and titled as "Carnival". [6]

"Carnival"

Wordless vocal rendition of the standard "Over the Waves".[citation needed] It was considered for an early assembly of the Sunflower album.[7]

"Seasons in The Sun"

Cover of Jacques Brel song recorded July 31 and August 4, 1970 with lead vocal by Carl.[2]

Bedroom Tapes (1971–72)

"Song to God"

Reported in existence by Beach Boys' friend Stanley Shapiro. A Brian Wilson tape that Dennis Wilson asked engineer Stephen Desper to set up on a reel-to-reel before Brian ripped it off the playback and yelled "Don’t you ever touch that again! That’s between me and God!" No tape has surfaced.[5]

"Won't You Tell Me"

Murry Wilson and Rick Henn song recorded June 19, 1971 with Brian and Carl Wilson on vocals.[2] A mix of the same recording with Henn on vocals was released on the 1996 Sunrays compilation For Collectors Only: Vintage Rays.[8]

"Sweet and Bitter"

Don Goldberg song from 1970, recorded at Brian's Bel Air home with Brian and Mike.[9][better source needed]

Auto Biography by Don Goldberg ( The Lost Song ) available on Amazon. Com



"My Solution"

Brian Wilson song recorded on October 31, 1970.[2] It is a novelty Halloween song with Brian attempting an impression of Vincent Price over a descending chord progression and test-tube sound effects.[4] Archivist Alan Boyd has said: "It’s kind of jokey track, Brian is playing a mad scientist and talking like Boris Karloff while the Beach Boys are singing (recites lyrics) 'What I have done with my solution, my instant aim to evolution.' It's interesting because Brian took the melody of it and later turned into the verse of a song called 'Happy Days' which showed up on his Imagination solo album."[10] In late 1976, Brian intimated to journalist Bob Harris: "We have a song called 'My Solution' which is a very odd song that has chromatic – strange chords, not regular triad chords. The notes are bunched up. It tells the story about how a guy found an old damsel outside his castle and decided to make her part of an experiment. ... It's about a guy who found his solution. It's a very odd, Boris Karloff eerie type of thing, so it's one of our more far out, left-field things that we've done."[11] Another attempt at "My Solution" was recorded during the summer of 1980, though no vocals were recorded.[2]

"Change Partners"

Cover of Stephen Stills song recorded in December 1971.[2]

"Beatrice From Baltimore"

Brian Wilson song recorded December 6–10, 1971 and January 31, 1972. Uncertain if Carl sings lead vocal.[2]

"I've Got A Friend"

Dennis Wilson song recorded in 1971 with no vocals. A live performance was recorded in the spring of 1972 with Dennis on lead.[2]

"Spark in the Dark"

Brian Wilson song recorded on January 21, 1972.[2] It is described to be a "pounding organ jam" with a synthesizer melody recycled later in Brian's solo career.[4]

"Body Talk"

Unknown song recorded February 17, 1972.[2]

"Out in the Country"

Uncertain if Al Jardine song. Recorded February 17 and February 20, 1972 with Jardine on lead vocal.[2]

"Is Jack Rieley Superman"

Brian Wilson song recorded circa 1972.[2] No tape has ever surfaced.[5]

"Gimme Some Lovin'"

Cover of The Spencer Davis Group song recorded on April 4, 1972 and June 23, 1977 with lead vocals by Brian.[2] In 2014, the tape was reported still missing.[5]

"Rooftop Harry"

Recorded on April 15, 1972 with lead vocals by Brian.[2] According to engineer Barry Rudolph, Brian had been sitting in a lotus position for two hours while the Beach Boys unloaded recording equipment into Larabee Studios in West Hollywood. When he awoke, he recorded himself playing piano, electric bass, toy piano, and a calliope. The entire track was processed through a new device called the Countryman Phaser. The tape of this recording was found 2014.[5]

Holland sessions (June–October 1972)

"Carry Me Home"

Dennis Wilson song recorded in summer 1972 with lead vocals by Dennis and Blondie Chaplin.[2] It was considered for the 2013 compilation Made in California but left off due to its somber lyrics.[10]

"Hard Times"

Blondie Chaplin and Ricky Fataar[failed verification] song recorded on October 4, 1972.[2]

1973–74

"Dr. Tom"

Al Jardine song recorded on March 12, 1973 with lead vocal by him.[2]

"Jumpin' Jack Flash"

Cover of The Rolling Stones song recorded live in 1972 and 1973.[2] Was intended for release on The Beach Boys in Concert.[citation needed]

"Canyon Summer"

Al Jardine song recorded in May 1973.[2]

"Pattycake"

Brian Wilson song recorded in summer 1973. Lead vocals by Brian.[2]

"Fading Love Song"

1973 Don Goldberg with Brian Wilson song.[12]

"Burlesque"

Brian Wilson and Jack Rieley composition. A lyric is "Tantalation and hot glowing skin/Sun’s ‘bout to rest." Carl & the Passions – "So Tough" outtake. No tape has surfaced.[5]

"Brian's Tune"

See "Shortenin' Bread".

"Clangin'"

See "Shortenin' Bread".

"Brian's Jam"

See "Shortenin' Bread".

"Honeycomb"

Unknown piece recorded in 1974 with prominent Moog synthesizer and jagged bass lines.[4]

"Just an Imitation"

Brian Wilson song recorded circa mid 1974. May feature Brian on lead.[2] Reportedly written about his father Murry Wilson who had died a year earlier; no tape has surfaced.[5]

"Why Don't You Try Me?"

Unknown song recorded in mid 1974.[2]

Caribou Ranch sessions (October–November 1974)

"Rolling Up to Heaven"

See "Shortenin' Bread".

"Earthquake Time"

Mike Love song recorded in the fall of 1974.[2]

"Battle Hymn of the Republic"

Cover of Howe/Steffe traditional recorded on November 5, 1974 with lead vocals by Mike Love.[2] It was briefly considered for release on the 1998 compilation Endless Harmony Soundtrack.[7]

1974–1976

"You're Riding High On the Music"

Brian Wilson and Stephen Kalinich song recorded in December 1974.[2]

"Don't Let Me Go"

Carl Wilson and Mike Love song recorded in December 1974.[2]

"Our Life, Our Love, Our Land"

Mike Love song recorded in December 1974.[2]

"Don't Fight the Sea"

Terry Jacks cover. Recording began on April 27 and 28, 1975.[2] A version appears on Al Jardine's 2010 solo album A Postcard from California, which also features vocals by Brian Wilson, Carl Wilson (who did his vocals for the song in 1988 [13]), Bruce Johnston, and Mike Love. The released version may contain elements from the 1975 recording.

"Feelin' Stronger Every Day"

Chicago song performed live in May and June 1975 with lead vocals by Mike Love and James Pankow.[2]

"Come to the Sunshine"

Cover of Van Dyke Parks song recorded in October 1975.[2]

"10,000 Years Ago"

Mike Love song recorded between January 30 and May 15, 1976.[2]

"Gold Rush"

Al Jardine song recorded on January 30 and May 15, 1976.[2]

"Lisa"

Mike Love song recorded January 30 and May 15, 1976 with Love on lead vocal.[2]

"Secret Love"

Cover Of Doris Day song recorded on January 30 and May 15, 1976.[2]

"Working in the Coal Mine"

Cover of Lee Dorsey song recorded on January 30 and May 15, 1976.[2]

"On Broadway"

Cover of The Drifters song recorded on March 3, 1976 with Jardine on lead vocal.[2]

"Mony Mony"

Cover of Tommy James and the Shondells song recorded March 15, 1976 with lead vocals by Billy Hinsche.[2]

"Runnin' Bear"

Cover of the Johnny Preston song recorded on April 13 and 14, 1976 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"Shake, Rattle & Roll"

Cover of the Big Joe Turner song recorded on April 14, 1976 with lead vocal by Jardine.[2]

"Michael Row the Boat Ashore"

Cover of the traditional song recorded April 16 and April 29, 1976 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"Let's Dance"

Cover of Chris Montez song recorded April 27, 1976.[2]

"Short Skirts"

Brian Wilson song recorded on May 8, 1976. No lead vocal recorded.[2]

"Marilyn Rovell"

Brian Wilson song recorded on August 21, 1976 with lead vocal by Brian.[2] The song is named for his then-wife, Marilyn Wilson-Rutherford.[2]

"Lazy Lizzie"

Brian Wilson song recorded in the fall of 1976 with lead vocal by Brian.[2] The chorus utilizes a melody from "Better Get Back in Bed", a section of the previously released Mount Vernon and Fairway (A Fairy Tale).

"We Gotta Groove"

Brian Wilson song recorded in the fall of 1976 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"That Special Feeling"

Brian Wilson song recorded in fall 1976 with lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"Hey There Moma"

Brian Wilson song recorded on October 27, 1976 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

Adult Child sessions (January–June 1977)

The following are listed as part of the February–June 1977 Adult Child sessions by Andrew Doe.[14]

"Deep Purple"

Cover of the Peter DeRose song recorded on February 25 and March 11, 1977 with lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"Everybody Wants to Live"

Brian Wilson song recorded between February and March 1977 with lead vocals by Brian and Carl.[2]

"It's Trying to Say"

Brian Wilson song recorded between February and March 1977 with lead vocals by Dennis.[2]

"New England Waltz"

Brian Wilson instrumental recorded in March 1977.[2]

"Life is for the Living"

Brian Wilson song recorded on March 11, 1977 with lead vocals by Brian and Carl.[2]

"Lines"

Brian Wilson song recorded on April 12, 1977 with lead vocals by Brian and Carl.[2] A cover was recorded by Duglas T. Stewart for Caroline Now!.[15]

1977–1979

"Mike, Come Back to L.A."

Brian Wilson song recorded between October and November 1977. No lead vocal recorded.[2] It was revisited in the Keepin' the Summer Alive (1980) track "Some of Your Love".[16]

Christmas Medley

Christmas medley recorded in October and November 1977. The Beach Boys and their children are singing as a group. The songs are "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen", "O Come All Ye Faithful", "Hark The Herald Angels Sing", and "We Wish You A Merry Christmas".[2]

"How's About a Little Bit of Your Sweet Lovin'?"

Brian Wilson, Mike Love, Diane Rovell, and Ron Altbach song recorded on November 15, December 4, 1977 and November 29, 1979.[2] A version was released by Celebration on their eponymous second album.[16]

"Sad, Sad Christmas"

Mike Love song recorded on November 23, 1977 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"Beach Burlesque"

Unknown song recorded during the M.I.U. Album sessions on November 17, 1977.[2][5] It may or may not be an additional name for the Brian Wilson/Jack Rieley song "Burlesque".[5]

"Go and Get That Girl"

Ed Tuleja and Ron Altbach song recorded November 17 and November 21, 1977 with lead vocal by Carl.[2]

"Christmas Day"

Mike Love and Brian Wilson song recorded November 17 and November 23, 1977. Love is on lead vocals.[2]

"Ride Arabian, Ride"

Al Jardine instrumental recorded on May 11, 1978.[2]

"Rubles"

Al Jardine song recorded on May 11, 1978 with lead vocal by Jardine.[2]

"Egypt"

Unknown song recorded November 18, 1977.[2]

"It Could Be Anything"

Carl Wilson song recorded on February 11, 1978. Also known as "Where We Are".[2]

"I Really Love You"

Unknown song recorded April 21, 1978.[2]

"Basketball Rock"

Brian Wilson instrumental recorded on May 13, 1978.[2]

"Bowling"

Brian Wilson Instrumental recorded on May 13, 1978.[2]

"Lookin' Down The Coast/Monterey"

Al Jardine song recorded July 27, 1978 with Brian and Jardine on lead vocals.[2] Intended to comprise a trilogy of songs which included "Santa Ana Winds" from Keepin' the Summer Alive.[16] A re-recording of "Lookin' Down the Coast" was featured on Jardine's A Postcard from California album.

"Calendar Girl"

Cover of Neil Sedaka and Howard Greenfield song recorded in late 1978 with lead vocals by Love.[2]

"I'm Begging You Please"

Brian Wilson song recorded between summer and October 6, 1978 with lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"California Beach"

Al Jardine and Mike Love song recorded in the spring of 1979 with Love on lead.[2]

"Skatetown U.S.A."

Reworking of "California Beach" which was recorded in the spring of 1979 with Love on lead.[2]

"Little Girl"

Cover of Phil Spector, Ellie Greenwich, and Jeff Barry song recorded in spring 1979 with lead vocal by Carl.[2] Intended for Keepin' the Summer Alive, it was cut at a refurbished Western Studio 3 with Brian as producer. "Little Girl" was later adapted into an original song and renamed "Sunshine" , as Bruce Johnston explains: "Well, 'Sunshine' was originally called 'Little Girl'. And I can't remember who recorded it, probably a Phil Spector record, and so we cut this track and then we decided to write a new song to the track, so we took part of the old song, 'Smoky Places', and whatever Mike and Brian came up with, recorded on the existing track, didn’t have enough room because the song was too short, so we tape-copied the track a few times, put 21 splices in the 24-track tape and stretched the song out and came up with 'Sunshine'."[16]

"Jamaica Farewell"

Cover of the Harry Belafonte song recorded July 23, 1979. No vocal was recorded.[2] It should not be confused with a version by California Music, recorded in 1976 with Brian on organ. As above, "Jamaica Farewell" was produced by Brian at the refurbished Western 3 studio.[16]

"Stranded in the Jungle"

Cover of the Jay Hawks song recorded on July 24, 1979. No vocal recorded.[2] As above, "Stranded in the Jungle" was produced by Brian at the refurbished Western 3 studio.[16]

"Johnny B. Goode"

Cover of the Chuck Berry song recorded between October 15 and November 13, 1979.[2] It is a Keepin' the Summer Alive outtake, and one of only two songs from the album's sessions with Dennis drumming.[17]

"Surfer Suzie"

Ed Carter song[16] recorded between October 10 and December 14, 1979 with lead vocal by Jardine.[2] It is a Keepin' the Summer Alive outtake recorded at Western.[17]

"Smoky Places"

Cover of the Corsairs song recorded on October 18, 1979 with lead vocal by Brian.[2] Later adapted to "Sunshine" (see "Little Girl").[16]

"Drip Drop"

Cover of the Leiber and Stoller song recorded on October 19, 1978 with lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"Boys and Girls"

Brian Wilson song recorded on October 19, 1979 and November 18, 1980.[2] It is a Keepin' the Summer Alive outtake recorded at Western.[17]

"I'll Always Love You"

Cover of Barry Mann song recorded between November 19, 1979 and January 1980 with lead vocal by Carl.[2] It is a Keepin' the Summer Alive outtake.[17]

"Starbaby"

Mike Love song recorded on November 29, 1979 with lead vocal by Love.[2] It is a Keepin' the Summer Alive outtake.[17] A version was released by Celebration on their eponymous second album.[16]

1980s–90s

"Song Within a Song"

Unknown song recorded on May 21, 1980.[2]

"River Deep, Mountain High"

Cover of Ellie Greenwich, Jeff Barry, and Phil Spector song recorded in July 1980 with lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"Be My Baby"

Cover of Ellie Greenwich, Jeff Barry, and Phil Spector song recorded in July 1980 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"Greenback Dollar"

Cover of The Kingston Trio song recorded in July 1980.[2]

"I'm a Man"

Brian Wilson song recorded in July 1980.[2]

"Fly"

Unknown song recorded October 31, 1980.[2]

"Up Again"

Unknown song recorded on November 18, 1980.[2]

"Candlesticks"

Unknown song recorded on November 18, 1980.[2]

"Stevie"

Brian Wilson song recorded between December 1980 and January 1981.[2] It was written about Stevie Nicks of Fleetwood Mac and considered for the 2013 compilation Made in California.[10] A cover was recorded by Saint Etienne for Caroline Now![15] and Interlude.

"I Ran (All The Way Home)"

A song recorded by The Beach Boys in the spring of 1981 with Mike Love on lead vocals.[2]

"Rings"

Brian Wilson song recorded in the spring of 1981.[2]

"Sweetie"

Brian Wilson song recorded in the spring of 1981 with lead vocals by Brian, Love, and Jardine.[2]

"Walking on Water"

Brian Wilson song recorded in the spring of 1981.[2]

"Oh Lord"

Brian Wilson song recorded in November of 1982 during the infamous Hamburger Sessions with Dennis, the song was reportedly attempted during The Beach Boys '85 album sessions .[2]

"The Boogie's Back in Town"

Brian Wilson song performed live in November 1983. Lead vocal by Brian.[2]

"Buzz-Buzz-Buzz"

Cover of the Hollywood Flames song performed live in July 1984. Lead vocal by Jardine.[2]

"And I Always Will"

Al Jardine song recorded on November 18, 1984 during sessions for The Beach Boys.[2] Later re-recorded for Jardine's album A Postcard from California.

"Down By The Pier"

Unknown song recorded between October 1984 and January 1985 with lead vocal by Carl.[2]

"At the Hop"

Cover of the Danny & the Juniors song recorded between October 1984 and January 1985.[2]

"Dancin' the Night Away"

Brian Wilson and Andy Paley song recorded in November 1995. Incomplete lead vocal by Carl.[2]

That's Why God Made the Radio sessions

A total of 28 songs were written and recorded for the album.[18] Discounting the 2011 rerecording of "Do It Again", only twelve tracks saw release.

"Waves of Love"

Outtake with lead vocals by Carl Wilson worked on during the album's sessions.[19] As a solo artist, it was completed by Al Jardine for the 2012 reissue of his album A Postcard from California (2010).

"I'd Go Anywhere"

Unknown song intended to bridge the tracks "Strange World" and "From There to Back Again". It was left unfinished.[20]

Alternate versions and demos

"Ruby Baby"

Cover of The Drifters song recorded September 1, September 18, and October 2, 1976. Brian is on lead vocals.[2] A version from the Beach Boys' Party sessions, recorded September 1965, was previously released on Good Vibrations: Thirty Years of the Beach Boys.[citation needed]

"Sherry She Needs Me"

Early version entitled "Sandy Baby" recorded circa 1964 with no lead vocal.[2]

"You Still Believe in Me"

Early version entitled "In My Childhood" with no vocals recorded on November 1, 1965.[2]

"Heroes and Villains"

Acetates were unearthed in 2013 that showed "I'm in Great Shape" as part of the projected "Heroes and Villains" single.[21][22]

"Look"

Version with group vocals.[2]

"Can't Wait Too Long"

Alternate version.[citation needed]

"Wake the World"

1970s remake recorded with Tandyn Almer and Stan Shapiro.[5]

"Be Still"

1970s remake recorded with Tandyn Almer and Stan Shapiro.[5]

"H.E.L.P. Is On the Way"

Alternate version entitled "Santa's On His Way"; Brian Wilson, Al Jardine, and Mike Love song recorded in late 1970, October 1977, and November 1977 with lead vocal by Love.[2]

"'Til I Die"

Early piano demo recorded by Brian Wilson.[5]

"A Day in the Life of a Tree"

Alternate take with Dennis Wilson on lead vocals. As of 2014, this version has yet to surface.[23]

"Sail On, Sailor"

Early piano demo recorded by Brian Wilson.[5]

"Shortenin' Bread"

Many alternate versions and permutations recorded by Brian Wilson.[5]

"Child of Winter (Christmas Song)"

Version with Carl and Dennis Wilson on lead vocals.[5]

"My Diane"

Alternate version of the M.I.U. Album track intended for Adult Child.[citation needed]

"She Believes in Love Again"

2012 rerecording made for That's Why God Made the Radio.[24]

References

  1. ^ Doe, Andrew G. "Album Archive Part 4: Compilations". Bellagio 10452. Endless Summer Quarterly.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed Doe, Andrew Grayham. "VAULTS". Endless Summer Quarterly. Retrieved December 11, 2014.
  3. ^ Priore 2005, p. 130.
  4. ^ a b c d Chidester, Brian (January 30, 2014). "Brian Wilson's Secret Bedroom Tapes". LA Weekly. Retrieved 1 February 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Chidester, Brian (March 7, 2014). "Busy Doin' Somethin': Uncovering Brian Wilson's Lost Bedroom Tapes". Paste. Retrieved December 11, 2014.
  6. ^ |url=[www.esquarterly.com] Summer Quarterly|accessdate=July 13, 2014}}
  7. ^ a b Doe, Andrew Grayham. "Unreleased Albums". Endless Summer Quarterly. Retrieved July 13, 2014.
  8. ^ [www.allmusic.com]
  9. ^ [www.youtube.com]
  10. ^ a b c "Beach Boys Producers Alan Boyd, Dennis Wolfe, Mark Linett Discuss 'Made in California' (Q&A)". Rock Cellar Magazine. September 4, 2013. Archived from the original on September 30, 2013. Retrieved September 9, 2013.
  11. ^ "INTERVIEW WITH BRIAN WILSON OF THE BEACH BOYS IN EARLY 1980'S". Global Image Works. 1976. Retrieved July 18, 2014.
  12. ^ [www.youtube.com]
  13. ^ [www.rollingstone.com]
  14. ^ Doe, Andrew G. "GIGS77". Bellagio 10452. Endless Summer Quarterly.
  15. ^ a b Ankeny, Jason. "Caroline Now!: The Songs of Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys". AllMusic. Retrieved August 2, 2014.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i Doe, Andrew G. (2000). KTSA / Beach Boys 85 (CD Liner). The Beach Boys. Capitol Records.
  17. ^ a b c d e Doe, Andrew G. "GIGS79". Bellagio 10452. Endless Summer Quarterly.
  18. ^ Fine, Jason (June 21, 2012). "The Beach Boys' Last Wave". Rolling Stone. p. 3. Retrieved July 23, 2012.
  19. ^ Boucher, Geoff (February 25, 2012). "Beach Boys ready for harmonic convergence on tour, album". Los Angeles Times.
  20. ^ Wyckoff, Mark (May 24, 2012). "The Beach Boys are making 'Radio' waves". VCStar.
  21. ^ "Beach Boys – 8 Original "Smile" Acetates from the collection of Van Dyke Parks". Record Mecca. recordmecca.com. 2013.
  22. ^ Smileysmile.net, andy on March 03, 2013, 12:56:03 AM
  23. ^ Chidester, Brian (March 5, 2015). "BRIAN WILSON'S SECRET BEDROOM TAPES: A TRACK-BY-TRACK DESCRIPTION". Los Angeles Weekly.
  24. ^ Graff, Gary (April 23, 2012). "Beach Boys Album: 'It's All Brand New'". Billboard. Retrieved 5 July 2014.