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List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries

A map of the world. The blue area, marked "UEFA", covers continental Europe, the British Isles, Iceland, and parts of Northern Asia and the Middle East.
  UEFA countries on this map of the world's six football confederations

The Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) is the administrative and controlling body for European football. It consists of 55 member associations, each of which is responsible for governing football in their respective countries.[1]

All widely recognised sovereign states located entirely within Europe are members, with the exceptions of the United Kingdom, Monaco and Vatican City. Eight states partially or entirely outside Europe are also members: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Israel, Cyprus and Turkey.[1] The United Kingdom is divided into the four separate football associations of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; each association has a separate UEFA membership. The Faroe Islands, an autonomous country of the Kingdom of Denmark, also has its own football association which is a member of UEFA.[1] The football association of Gibraltar, a British Overseas Territory, was approved as a member by UEFA in 2013.[2] Kosovo was approved as a member in 2016, even though it is claimed by Serbia and is not recognised by several other UEFA member states.

Each UEFA member has its own football league system, except Liechtenstein.[3] Clubs playing in each top-level league compete for the title as the country's club champions. Clubs also compete in the league and national cup competitions for places in the following season's UEFA club competitions, the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. Due to promotion and relegation, the clubs playing in the top-level league are different every season, except in San Marino where there is only one level.[4]

Some clubs play in a national football league other than their own country's. Where this is the case the club is noted as such.

UEFA coefficients

The UEFA league coefficients, also known as the UEFA rankings, are used to rank the leagues of Europe, and thus determine the number of clubs from a league that will participate in UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. A country's ranking determines the number of teams competing in the season after the next; the 2009 rankings determined qualification for European competitions in the 2010–11 season.[5]

A country's ranking is calculated based on the results of its clubs in UEFA competitions over the past five seasons. Two points are awarded for each win by a club, and one for a draw. If a game goes to extra time, the result at the end of time is used to calculate ranking points; if the match goes to a penalty shootout, it is considered to be a draw for the purposes of the coefficient system. The number of points awarded to a country's clubs are added together, and then divided by the number of clubs that participated in European competitions that season. This number is then rounded to three decimal places; two and two-thirds would become 2.667.[5]

For the league coefficient the season's league coefficients for the last five seasons must be added up. In the preliminary rounds of both the Champions League and Europa League, the awarded points are halved. Bonus points for certain achievements are added to the number of points scored in a season. Bonus points are allocated for:

  • Qualifying for the Champions League group phase. (4 bonus points)
  • Reaching the second round of the Champions League. (5 bonus points)
  • Reaching the quarter, semi and final of both Champions League and Europa League. (1 bonus point)[5]

Albania

The top division of Albanian football was formed in 1930, and the inaugural title was won by SK Tirana (now known as KF Tirana). Tirana are the most successful team in the league's history, having won the competition on 24 occasions, followed by KS Dinamo Tirana (now playing in the second division) with 18 championships, and Partizani Tirana with 15.[7] The league became affiliated with UEFA in 1954.[8] Since the 2014–15 season, 10 teams compete in the division. The teams finishing in the bottom two places are relegated to the Albanian First Division and are replaced by the champions of each of that league's two groups.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Partizani 25 53
2 Kukësi 25 44
3 Teuta 25 40
4 Laçi 25 37
5 Skënderbeu 25 37
6 Flamurtari 25 35
7 Tirana 25 29
8 Luftëtari 25 28
9 Kastrioti 25 24
10 Kamza (D) 25 17
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Albanian Football Association, Soccerway
(D) Disqualified.

Andorra

Andorra's national league system was formed in 1993, and the Andorran Football Federation gained UEFA membership in 1996.[12] Records from the league's first three seasons are incomplete, but FC Santa Coloma have won more First Division titles than any other team.[13] Another Andorran football club, FC Andorra, play in the Spanish football league system. In recent years, eight teams have competed in the First Division. Each team plays two matches against the other seven clubs. After fourteen games, the league splits into two groups, with teams carrying their previous points totals forward. The top four teams play each other a further two times in the championship round to decide 1st–4th places, while the bottom four teams do likewise in the relegation round, to determine the 5th–8th positions. At the end of the season, the bottom-placed team is relegated, while the seventh-placed team plays a two-legged play-off against the second-placed team in the Second Division to decide which team plays in which division for the following season.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Andorra and the 8 teams of the 2018–19 Primera Divisió
Escaldes-Engordany
Escaldes-Engordany
Escaldes-Engordany teams: Engordany Inter d'Escaldes
Escaldes-Engordany teams:
Engordany
Inter d'Escaldes
Santa Coloma
Santa Coloma
Location of teams in the 2018–19 Primera Divisió


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Sant Julià (Q) 19 39
2 Inter Club d'Escaldes (Q) 19 38
3 FC Santa Coloma (Q) 19 37
4 Engordany (Q) 19 30
5 Ordino (Q) 19 20
6 UE Santa Coloma (Q) 19 20
7 Lusitanos (Q) 19 18
8 Encamp (Q) 19 9
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: FAF Soccerway
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Armenia

Armenia gained independence in 1991, following the break-up of the Soviet Union. Organised football had been played in Armenia since 1936, as part of the Soviet football system. The Football Federation of Armenia gained UEFA affiliation in 1992, and the league ran as the national championship for the first time in the same year.[15][16] Since independence, the country's most successful team are FC Pyunik, who have won ten league titles.[15]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Armenia
Yerevan
Yerevan
Locations of the 2018–19 Armenian Premier League teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Ararat-Armenia 21 38
2 Pyunik 21 36
3 Alashkert 20 36
4 Banants 20 34
5 Lori 20 30
6 Shirak 21 27
7 Gandzasar 20 23
8 Ararat Yerevan 21 14
9 Artsakh 20 14
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Soccerway

Austria

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Austria
Location of teams in the 2018–19 Austrian Football Bundesliga


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Red Bull Salzburg 22 55
2 LASK Linz 22 46
3 Sturm Graz 22 31
4 Wolfsberger AC 22 30
5 Austria Wien 22 30
6 St. Pölten 22 30
7 Mattersburg 22 29
8 Rapid Wien 22 27
9 Hartberg 22 26
10 Admira Wacker Mödling 22 21
11 Rheindorf Altach 22 18
12 Wacker Innsbruck 22 17

Azerbaijan

Although the country was part of the Soviet Union, the first Azerbaijan-wide football competition took place in 1928, and became an annual occurrence from 1934. Following the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991, the first independent Azeri championship took place in 1992, and the Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan gained UEFA affiliation in 1994[18][19] Since independence, the country's most successful team are PFC Neftchi Baku, with eight league titles. In recent years, 10 teams had competed in the Azerbaijan Premier League, but two teams that otherwise would have competed in the 2016–17 season were denied professional licenses, making it an eight-team league at present.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Azerbaijan
Locations of the 2018–19 Azerbaijan Premier League teams.
Team in italics is from a zone of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and is playing its home games in Baku.


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Neftçi Baku 21 45
2 Qarabağ 21 45
3 Sabail 21 31
4 Gabala 21 29
5 Sabah 21 22
6 Zira 21 22
7 Keşla 21 19
8 Sumgayit 21 17
Updated to match(es) played on 15 March 2019. Source: Soccerway

Belarus

Belarus declared independence from the Soviet Union in 1990. Its independence was widely recognised within Europe in 1991, an independent national championship began in 1992, and UEFA membership followed in 1993.[21] Through the 2017 season, the most successful team is FC BATE, with 14 league championships, including an ongoing streak of 12 titles.[22] The 2016 season saw the league expand from 14 teams to 16, accomplished by promoting three clubs from the Belarusian First League and relegating only the last-place team in the 2015 Premier League. At the end of the season, the bottom two teams are relegated to the First League and replaced by that league's top two finishers.

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 BATE Borisov (C) 30 73
2 Shakhtyor Soligorsk 30 64
3 Dinamo Minsk 30 63
4 Vitebsk 30 62
5 Torpedo-BelAZ Zhodino 30 55
6 Dinamo Brest 30 52
7 Neman Grodno 30 43
8 Slutsk 30 36
9 Gorodeya 30 34
10 Isloch Minsk Raion 30 33
11 Minsk 30 30
12 Gomel 30 28
13 Luch Minsk 30 24
14 Torpedo Minsk 30 24
15 Smolevichi (R) 30 24
16 Dnepr Mogilev (R) 30 16
Source: [2]
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

Belgium

Organised football reached Belgium in the 19th century; the Royal Belgian Football Association was founded in 1895, and FC Liégeois became the country's first champions the following year. Belgium joined European football's governing body, UEFA, upon its formation in 1954.[24] Historically the country's most successful team are R.S.C. Anderlecht, with 33 league titles as of 2016.[25] The Belgian First Division A, historically known as the First Division and also known as the Pro League from 2008–09 through 2015–16, currently consists of 16 teams. Initially, each team plays the other clubs twice for a total of 30 matches. At this point, the league proceeds as follows (as of the current 2016–17 season):[26]

  • The top six teams take half of their points (rounded up) into a championship play-off, playing each other two further times to determine the national champion.
  • The teams finishing the regular season between 7th and 15th enter one of two six-team groups. The remaining teams in this competition are the top three teams from the Belgian First Division B (historically known as the Second Division), excluding that division's champion (which earns automatic promotion to First Division A). Each team plays the other five teams in its group home and away, and the winners of each group play one another in a two-legged play-off. The winner of that match advances to a two-legged play-off against the fourth- or fifth-place team (depending on results) from the championship play-off for the country's final UEFA Europa League place for the following season.
  • The bottom team on the regular-season table is automatically relegated to First Division B.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Genk 30 63
2 Club Brugge 30 56
3 Standard Liège 30 53
4 Anderlecht 30 51
5 Gent 30 50
6 Antwerp 30 49
7 Sint-Truiden 30 47
8 Kortrijk 30 43
9 Charleroi 30 42
10 Excel Mouscron 30 40
11 Zulte Waregem 30 33
12 Eupen 30 32
13 Cercle Brugge 30 28
14 Oostende 30 27
15 Waasland-Beveren 30 27
16 Lokeren (R) 30 20
Source: Belgian First Division A (in Dutch), Soccerway
(R) Relegated.

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Prior to gaining independence from Yugoslavia, clubs from Bosnia and Herzegovina were eligible to compete in the Yugoslav First League, which they won three times. The country gained independence in 1992, and its Football Association gained UEFA membership in 1998.[28] Due to political tensions between Bosniaks, Bosnian Serbs and Bosnian Croats, the country did not have a single national top division until the 2002–03 season, but rather two or three. Since then, Zrinjski have won five titles, Željezničar have won three, Sarajevo and Široki Brijeg have each won twice, and three other teams have won it once each.[29]

Since the 2016–17 season, the Premier League has consisted of 12 clubs, reduced from 16 in previous seasons. The 2016–17 season was the first for a two-stage season. In the first stage, each team plays all others home and away, after which the league splits into two six-team groups that also play home and away. The top six teams play for the championship and European qualifying places; the bottom six play to avoid relegation. At the end of the second stage, the bottom two clubs of the relegation group drop to either the First League of Bosnia and Herzegovina or the First League of the Republika Srpska.[30]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Sarajevo 23 53
2 Zrinjski Mostar 23 44
3 Željezničar 23 35
4 Široki Brijeg 23 35
5 Radnik Bijeljina 23 32
6 Čelik Zenica 23 31
7 Sloboda Tuzla 23 30
8 Mladost Doboj Kakanj 23 30
9 Tuzla City 23 24
10 Zvijezda 09 23 23
11 GOŠK Gabela 23 19
12 Krupa 23 17
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Soccerway, UEFA

Bulgaria

A national Bulgarian championship has been held in every year since 1924, although the 1924, 1927 and 1944 seasons were not completed. The country gained UEFA membership in 1954.[32] Historically, the most successful teams in Bulgarian football have been PFC CSKA Sofia and PFC Levski Sofia; no other team has won more than seven league titles. In recent years, PFC Ludogorets Razgrad has dominated the league; although the team did not make its first appearance in the top flight until 2011–12, it has won the championship in each of its first seven seasons at that level.[33] The 2015–16 season was intended to have 12 teams, but was reduced to 10 after four clubs (the two clubs that would otherwise have been promoted to what was then known as the A Group, plus two from the previous season's A Group) were denied professional licenses. Following that season, the Bulgarian Football Union revamped the country's professional league structure, expanding the top flight to 14 teams and changing that league's name from "A Group" to "First League".

Under the current structure that began in 2016–17, each team plays the others twice, once at each club's stadium. At the end of the season the league splits into separate playoffs, with table points and statistics carrying over in full. The top six teams enter a championship playoff, with each team playing the others home and away. The top finisher is league champion and enters the UEFA Champions League; the second-place team earns a place in the UEFA Europa League; and the third-place team (or fourth-place team, should the winner of that season's Bulgarian Cup finish in the top three) advances to a playoff for the country's final Europa League place. The bottom eight split into two four-team groups, playing home and away within each group. The top two teams from each group enter a knockout playoff consisting of two-legged matches (note, however, that if one of these four teams is the Bulgarian Cup winner, it is withdrawn from the playoff and its opponent receives a bye into the final). The winner of this playoff then plays the third-place team in a one-off match for the final Europa League place. The bottom two clubs from each group enter an identical knockout playoff. The winner remains in the First League; the other three teams face a series of relegation playoffs that also include the second- and third-place clubs from the Second League, with places for only two of these five teams in the next season's First League.[34]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Bulgaria and the 14 teams of the 2018–19 Parva Liga
Sofia
Sofia
Location of teams in the 2018–19 Parva Liga
List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Sofia
Sofia 2018–19 First League football clubs
Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Ludogorets Razgrad 26 62
2 CSKA Sofia 26 57
3 Levski Sofia 26 54
4 Botev Plovdiv 26 45
5 Cherno More 26 42
6 Beroe 26 42
7 Etar 26 40
8 Lokomotiv Plovdiv 26 35
9 Slavia Sofia 26 33
10 Botev Vratsa 26 31
11 Vitosha Bistritsa 26 25
12 Septemvri Sofia 26 21
13 Dunav Ruse 26 20
14 Vereya 26 6
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Soccerway

Croatia

National Croatian leagues were organised in 1914 and during the Second World War, but during peacetime Croatia's biggest clubs competed in the Yugoslav First League. After Croatia declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991, a national football league was formed in 1992, and the Croatian Football Federation gained UEFA membership in 1993.[36] Since its formation, the Croatian First League has been dominated by NK Dinamo Zagreb and HNK Hajduk Split; as of the end of the 2015–16 season, one of these teams has won the title in all but one of the league's 25 seasons.[37] Since the 2013–14 season, the First League has consisted of 10 teams. At the end of the season, the 10th-placed team is relegated directly to the second division, while the 9th-placed team enters a relegation play-off.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Dinamo Zagreb 25 64
2 Rijeka 25 47
3 Osijek 25 42
4 Lokomotiva 25 41
5 Hajduk Split 25 40
6 Gorica 25 38
7 Inter Zaprešić 25 24
8 Slaven Belupo 25 22
9 Istra 1961 25 17
10 Rudeš 25 7
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: PrvaHNL.hr

Cyprus

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Cyprus
Locations of the 2018–19 Cypriot First Division teams.


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 APOEL 22 49
2 Apollon Limassol 22 47
3 AEL Limassol 22 45
4 AEK Larnaca 22 39
5 Omonia 22 31
6 Nea Salamis Famagusta 22 31
7 Anorthosis Famagusta 22 28
8 Pafos FC 22 21
9 Doxa Katokopias 22 20
10 Enosis Neon Paralimni 22 17
11 Alki Oroklini 22 17
12 Ermis Aradippou 22 10
Source: CFA (in Greek), Soccerway

Czech Republic

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Slavia Prague 25 64
2 Viktoria Plzeň 25 55
3 Sparta Prague 25 50
4 Jablonec 25 41
5 Baník Ostrava 25 39
6 Fastav Zlín 25 36
7 Mladá Boleslav 25 34
8 Slovan Liberec 25 34
9 Teplice 25 32
10 Sigma Olomouc 25 31
11 Slovácko 25 30
12 Opava 25 27
13 Bohemians 1905 25 26
14 Příbram 25 26
15 Dukla Prague 25 19
16 Karviná 25 17
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Soccerway

Denmark

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Copenhagen 26 61
2 Midtjylland 26 60
3 OB 26 42
4 Brøndby 26 38
5 Esbjerg 26 38
6 Nordsjælland 26 36
7 AaB 26 36
8 Randers 26 34
9 AGF 26 31
10 Horsens 26 31
11 SønderjyskE 26 28
12 Vendsyssel 26 22
13 Hobro 26 21
14 Vejle 26 20

England

Founded in 1888, the Football League was the world's first national football league.[45] The inaugural competition was won by Preston North End, who remained unbeaten throughout the entire season. It was the top level football league in England from its foundation until 1992, when the 22 clubs comprising the First Division resigned from the Football League to form the new FA Premier League.[45] As of the 2017–18 season the Premier League comprises 20 clubs;[46] each team plays every other team twice, with the bottom 3 clubs at the end of the season relegated to the EFL Championship. The most successful domestic club is Manchester United, who have won the league 20 times, while the most successful English club in Europe is Liverpool FC, who have won 5 European Cups, 3 UEFA Cups and 3 UEFA Super Cups, more than any other English team.[47]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Liverpool (X) 31 76
2 Manchester City (X) 30 74
3 Tottenham Hotspur 30 61
4 Arsenal 30 60
5 Manchester United 30 58
6 Chelsea 30 57
7 Wolverhampton Wanderers 30 44
8 Watford 30 43
9 West Ham United 31 42
10 Leicester City 31 41
11 Everton 31 40
12 Bournemouth 31 38
13 Newcastle United 31 35
14 Crystal Palace 30 33
15 Brighton & Hove Albion 29 33
16 Southampton 30 30
17 Burnley 31 30
18 Cardiff City 30 28
19 Fulham 31 17
20 Huddersfield Town 31 14
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Premier League
(X) Assured of at least Europa League, but may still qualify for Champions League.

Estonia

An independent Estonian league took place between 1921 and 1940. However, after the Second World War it became part of the Soviet Union, and became a regional system. Estonia regained independence after the dissolution of the USSR, organising the first national championship in 52 years in 1992, the same year that the Estonian Football Association joined UEFA.[48][49] FC Flora Tallinn is the most successful team in the modern era, with 10 league titles as of the end of the 2016 season.[48] Since 2005, the Premier Division has consisted of 10 teams, which play one another four times. At the end of the season the bottom team is relegated to the second level of Estonian football, while the ninth-placed team enters into a relegation playoff.[50]

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Nõmme Kalju (C) 36 86
2 FCI Levadia 36 84
3 Flora 36 83
4 Narva Trans 36 61
5 Paide Linnameeskond 36 51
6 Tammeka 36 49
7 Tulevik 36 29
8 Tallinna Kalev 36 28
9 Kuressaare (O) 36 21
10 Vaprus (R) 36 13
Source: Estonian Football Association (in Estonian), UEFA, Soccerway
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands are a constituent country of the Kingdom of Denmark, which also comprises Greenland and Denmark itself. The league was formed in 1942, and has been contested annually since, with the exception of 1944 due to a lack of available balls.[52] The Faroe Islands gained UEFA recognition in 1992.[53] The most successful teams are Havnar Bóltfelag and KÍ Klaksvík, with 22 and 17 Premier League titles respectively as of the most recently completed 2016 season. Since the 1988 season, the Premier League has consisted of 10 teams.[54] They play each other three times, with the bottom two teams relegated to the First Division.

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:

Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Havnar Bóltfelag (C) 27 73
2 NSÍ Runavík 27 55
3 B36 Tórshavn 27 53
4 KÍ Klaksvík 27 51
5 Víkingur Gøta 27 39
6 Skála ÍF 27 29
7 TB/FC Suðuroy/Royn 27 28
8 EB/Streymur 27 21
9 Argja Bóltfelag 27 18
10 07 Vestur (R) 27 17
Updated to match(es) played on 27 October 2018. Source: Faroe Soccer (in Faroese), Soccerway
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

Finland

Finland's current league has been contested annually since 1898, with the exceptions of 1914 and 1943.[56] The most successful team are HJK Helsinki with 22 titles; as of 2010, no other team has won 10 or more. However, between 1920 and 1948 a rival championship operated, organised by the Finnish Workers' Sports Federation. Frequent champions in that competition before it came under the jurisdiction of the Football Association of Finland included Kullervo Helsinki, Vesa Helsinki and Tampereen Pallo-Veikot.[57] The Premier League consists of 12 teams, which play one another three times each for a total of 33 matches. At the end of the season the bottom club is relegated to the First Division.

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 HJK (C) 33 78
2 RoPS 33 62
3 KuPS 33 58
4 Honka 33 58
5 Ilves 33 49
6 VPS 33 41
7 Inter Turku 33 40
8 Lahti 33 40
9 SJK 33 32
10 IFK Mariehamn 33 31
11 TPS (R) 33 29
12 PS Kemi Kings (R) 33 24
Updated to match(es) played on 27 October 2018. Source: Veikkausliiga (in Finnish), Soccerway
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

France

France's first football team—Le Havre AC—formed in 1872. The first French championship was first held in 1894, but only featured teams from the capital, Paris. Between 1896 and 1912, national championships were organised by several competing federations; the first universally recognised national championship took place in the 1912–13 season. However, it only lasted two seasons; from the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, French football operated on a regional basis until 1932. A national league resumed between 1932 and 1939, and has operated annually since the conclusion of the Second World War in 1945.[58] Ligue 1 and its predecessors have featured 20 teams since the 1946–47 season. Each team plays the other nineteen sides home and away, and at the end of the season the bottom three teams are relegated to Ligue 2.[59] So far, Olympique de Marseille are the only French club to have won the UEFA Champions League, in 1993.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Paris Saint-Germain (T) 28 77
2 Lille 29 57
3 Lyon 29 53
4 Marseille 29 47
5 Saint-Étienne 29 46
6 Reims 29 46
7 Montpellier 29 42
8 Rennes 28 41
9 Nice 29 41
10 Strasbourg 29 39
11 Nîmes 28 37
12 Angers 29 36
13 Bordeaux 29 34
14 Toulouse 29 32
15 Nantes 28 31
16 Monaco 29 30
17 Amiens 29 29
18 Guingamp 29 22
19 Dijon 29 21
20 Caen 29 20
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Ligue 1 and Soccerway
(T) Qualified, but not yet to the particular phase indicated.

Georgia

A Georgian football championship first took place in 1926, as part of the Soviet football system. The first independent championship took place in 1990, despite the fact that Georgia remained a Soviet state until 1991. Upon independence, Georgia subsequently joined UEFA and FIFA in 1992.[61]

When Georgia organised its first independent championship, it operated with a spring-to-autumn season contained entirely within a calendar year. After the 1991 championship, the country transitioned to an autumn-to-spring season spanning two calendar years. This format continued through the 2015–16 season, after which it returned to a spring-to-autumn format. This was accomplished by holding an abbreviated 2016 season in autumn; the transition was completed for the 2017 season. Before the most recent transition, 16 teams had competed in the top flight, but the league was reduced to 14 teams for the 2016 season, and was reduced further to 10 for 2017 and beyond.

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Saburtalo Tbilisi (C) 36 79
2 Dinamo Tbilisi 36 69
3 Torpedo Kutaisi 36 69
4 Chikhura Sachkhere 36 64
5 Dila Gori 36 63
6 Locomotive Tbilisi 36 44
7 Rustavi 36 37
8 Sioni Bolnisi (O) 36 31
9 Samtredia (R) 36 21
10 Kolkheti Poti (R) 36 14
Source: Erovnuli Liga (in Georgian), Soccerway
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Germany

The Bundesliga consists of 18 teams, who play each other twice, for a total of 34 matches. The teams finishing in 17th and 18th places are relegated directly to the 2. Bundesliga, while the team finishing in 16th place enters into a two-legged play-off with the team finishing 3rd in the lower division.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Bayern Munich 26 60
2 Borussia Dortmund 26 60
3 RB Leipzig 26 49
4 Borussia Mönchengladbach 26 47
5 Eintracht Frankfurt 26 46
6 Bayer Leverkusen 26 42
7 VfL Wolfsburg 26 42
8 Werder Bremen 26 39
9 1899 Hoffenheim 26 38
10 Hertha BSC 26 35
11 SC Freiburg 26 31
12 Fortuna Düsseldorf 26 31
13 Mainz 05 26 30
14 FC Augsburg 26 25
15 Schalke 04 26 23
16 VfB Stuttgart 26 20
17 Hannover 96 26 14
18 1. FC Nürnberg 26 13
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: DFB

Gibraltar

The Gibraltar Football Association was founded in 1895, making it one of the ten oldest active football associations in the world. League football has been organized by the GFA since 1905. The first league season after Gibraltar were accepted as full members of UEFA was 2013–14, making qualification to the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League possible since the 2014–15 season, provided the relevant club has received a UEFA licence.[2] The Premier Division has consisted of 10 teams since the 2015–16 season. All league matches are held at Victoria Stadium.

Clubs as of 2018–19 season:

The stand of a football stadium, appearing to be made of concrete, in the daytime. The centre section of the stand is covered by a roof. On the front edge of the roof, the letters "VICTORIA STADIUM" can be seen.
View of the Victoria Stadium's West Stand.


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Lincoln Red Imps 20 48
2 Europa FC 20 48
3 St Joseph's 20 42
4 Mons Calpe 20 33
5 Gibraltar Phoenix 20 33
6 Gibraltar United 20 31
7 Lynx 20 21
8 Glacis United 20 17
9 Boca Gibraltar 20 7
10 Lions Gibraltar 20 6
Updated to match(es) played on 10 March 2019. Source: UEFA, Soccerway

Greece

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 PAOK (Q) 25 67
2 Olympiacos 24 57
3 AEK Athens 25 47
4 Atromitos 25 43
5 Aris Thessaloniki 25 40
6 Panetolikos 25 33
7 Panathinaikos 24 32
8 Lamia 25 30
9 Panionios 25 29
10 Xanthi 25 29
11 Asteras Tripolis 25 27
12 AEL 25 27
13 PAS Giannina 25 23
14 OFI 25 22
15 Levadiakos 25 20
16 Apollon Smyrnis 25 10
Updated to match(es) played on 18 March 2019. Source: Superleague Greece, Soccerway
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Hungary

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Hungary and the 12 teams of the 2018–19 Nemzeti Bajnokság I
Budapest
Budapest
Location of teams in 2018–19 Nemzeti Bajnokság I
List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Budapest
Location of Budapest teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Ferencváros 25 55
2 MOL Vidi 25 47
3 Debrecen 25 40
4 Újpest 25 40
5 Budapest Honvéd 25 39
6 Mezőkövesd 25 32
7 MTK Budapest 25 31
8 Paks 25 31
9 Puskás Akadémia 25 30
10 Diósgyőr 25 27
11 Kisvárda 25 25
12 Szombathelyi Haladás 25 16
Updated to match(es) played on 16 March 2018. Source: Hungarian Football Federation (in Hungarian), Soccerway

Iceland

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Valur (C, Q) 22 46
2 Breiðablik (Q) 22 44
3 Stjarnan (Q) 22 40
4 KR (Q) 22 37
5 FH 22 37
6 ÍBV 22 29
7 KA 22 28
8 Fylkir 22 26
9 Víkingur R. 22 25
10 Grindavík 22 25
11 Fjölnir (R) 22 19
12 Keflavík (R) 22 4
Updated to match(es) played on 29 September 2018. Source: KSÍ (in Icelandic), Soccerway
(C) Champion; (Q) Qualified to the phase indicated; (R) Relegated.

Israel

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Maccabi Tel Aviv 26 66
2 Maccabi Haifa 26 44
3 Maccabi Netanya 26 43
4 Hapoel Be'er Sheva 26 39
5 Bnei Yehuda 26 37
6 Hapoel Hadera 26 33
7 Hapoel Haifa 26 32
8 Hapoel Tel Aviv 26 31
9 Ironi Kiryat Shmona 26 30
10 Hapoel Ra'anana 26 30
11 Beitar Jerusalem 26 29
12 Maccabi Petah Tikva 26 28
13 F.C. Ashdod 26 22
14 Bnei Sakhnin 26 21
Source: Soccerway

Italy

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Juventus 28 75
2 Napoli 28 60
3 Internazionale 28 53
4 AC Milan 28 51
5 Roma 28 47
6 Atalanta 28 45
7 Lazio 27 45
8 Torino 28 44
9 Sampdoria 28 42
10 Fiorentina 28 37
11 Genoa 28 33
12 Parma 28 33
13 Sassuolo 28 32
14 Cagliari 28 30
15 SPAL 28 26
16 Udinese 27 25
17 Empoli 28 25
18 Bologna 28 24
19 Frosinone 28 17
20 Chievo 28 11
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Serie A, Soccerway

Kazakhstan

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:

Map of Kazakhstan and the 12 teams of the 2018 Premier League
Locations of teams in the 2018 Kazakhstan Premier League


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Astana (C) 33 77
2 Kairat 33 62
3 Tobol 33 53
4 Ordabasy 33 46
5 Kaisar 33 45
6 Zhetysu 33 43
7 Aktobe 33 42
8 Shakhter Karagandy 33 36
9 Atyrau 33 36
10 Irtysh Pavlodar (O) 33 35
11 Kyzylzhar (R) 33 35
12 Akzhayik (R) 33 30
Source: UEFA, Soccerway
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Kosovo

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Feronikeli 23 55
2 Llapi 23 48
3 Prishtina 22 47
4 Drita 23 38
5 Gjilani 23 32
6 Drenica 23 30
7 Ballkani 23 29
8 Trepça'89 23 28
9 Flamurtari 22 28
10 Ferizaj 23 25
11 Liria 23 24
12 KEK 22 1
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Football Federation of Kosovo (in Albanian), Soccerway

Latvia

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Latvia
Riga
Riga
Riga teams: METTA/LU RFS Riga
Riga teams:
METTA/LU
RFS
Riga
Locations of the 2018 Latvian Higher League teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Riga (C) 28 64
2 Ventspils 28 60
3 RFS 28 55
4 Liepāja 28 51
5 Spartaks Jūrmala 28 42
6 Jelgava 28 21
7 METTA/LU (O) 28 19
8 Valmiera Glass ViA (R) 28 8
Source: Soccerway
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Lithuania

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Sūduva 28 67
2 Žalgiris 28 62
3 Stumbras 28 45
4 Trakai 28 42
5 Kauno Žalgiris 28 35
6 Atlantas 28 23
7 Palanga (O) 28 20
8 Jonava (R) 28 19
Source: A Lyga (in Lithuanian), UEFA, Soccerway
(O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Luxembourg

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 F91 Dudelange 17 36
2 Progrès Niederkorn 17 33
3 Fola Esch 17 32
4 Jeunesse Esch 17 31
5 Union Titus Pétange 17 30
6 Racing FC 17 27
7 UNA Strassen 17 26
8 Differdange 03 17 24
9 Etzella Ettelbruck 17 21
10 Mondorf-les-Bains 17 18
11 Victoria Rosport 17 18
12 Hostert 17 15
13 RM Hamm Benfica 17 12
14 Rumelange 17 9
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: UEFA, Soccerway

Macedonia

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Republic of North Macedonia
Skopje
Skopje
Skopje clubs:
Skopje clubs:
Location of teams in 2018–19 Macedonian First League


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Shkëndija 23 50
2 Akademija Pandev 23 42
3 Vardar 23 42
4 Shkupi 23 33
5 Rabotnichki 23 31
6 Renova 23 30
7 Makedonija GP 23 26
8 Sileks 23 24
9 Belasica 23 19
10 Pobeda 23 18
Updated to match(es) played on 16 March 2019. Source: MacedonianFootball.com

Malta

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Valletta 21 50
2 Hibernians 21 48
3 Gżira United 21 42
4 Sliema Wanderers 21 38
5 Ħamrun Spartans 21 37
6 Birkirkara 21 36
7 Balzan 21 33
8 Floriana 21 25
9 Mosta 21 22
10 Tarxien Rainbows 21 22
11 Senglea Athletic 21 20
12 St. Andrews 21 18
13 Qormi 21 13
14 Pietà Hotspurs 21 10
Updated to match(es) played on 14 March 2019. Source: Malta Football Association

Moldova

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Moldova
Tiraspol
Tiraspol
Tiraspol teams: Dinamo-Auto Sheriff
Tiraspol teams:
Dinamo-Auto
Sheriff
Location of teams in 2018 Moldovan National Division


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Sheriff Tiraspol (C) 28 63
2 Milsami Orhei 28 45
3 Petrocub-Hîncești 28 45
4 Speranța Nisporeni 28 38
5 Zimbru Chișinău 28 36
6 Dinamo-Auto 28 28
7 Sfântul Gheorghe 28 26
8 Zaria Bălți (R) 28 22
Source: FMF, UEFA, Soccerway
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

Montenegro

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Montenegro and the 12 teams of the 2018–19 First League
Location of the 2018–19 Montenegrin First League teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Sutjeska 25 52
2 Budućnost 25 45
3 Zeta 25 39
4 OFK Titograd 25 38
5 Petrovac 25 38
6 Grbalj 25 32
7 Iskra 25 30
8 Rudar 25 29
9 Lovćen 25 17
10 Mornar 25 12
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: UEFA, Soccerway

Netherlands

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 PSV Eindhoven 26 67
2 Ajax 26 62
3 Feyenoord 26 47
4 AZ 26 47
5 Vitesse 26 40
6 Utrecht 26 40
7 Heracles Almelo 26 39
8 Groningen 26 35
9 Willem II 26 34
10 Heerenveen 26 33
11 VVV-Venlo 26 32
12 PEC Zwolle 26 29
13 Fortuna Sittard 26 29
14 ADO Den Haag 26 28
15 Excelsior 26 26
16 De Graafschap 26 25
17 Emmen 26 25
18 NAC Breda 26 17
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: eredivisie.nl

Northern Ireland

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Belfast with the location of the Belfast-based teams in the 2018–19 NIFL Premiership
Location of the Belfast-based teams in the 2018–19 NIFL Premiership


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Linfield 32 74
2 Ballymena United 32 68
3 Crusaders 32 63
4 Glenavon 32 57
5 Cliftonville 32 51
6 Coleraine 32 51
7 Glentoran 32 38
8 Dungannon Swifts 32 36
9 Institute 32 35
10 Warrenpoint Town 32 31
11 Ards 32 18
12 Newry City 32 17
Updated to match(es) played on 19 March 2019. Source: NIFL Premiership, Soccerway
Notes:
  1. ^ Teams play each other three times (33 matches), before the league split into two groups (the top six and the bottom six) for the last five matches.
  • Derry City, a club from Northern Ireland, has competed in the Republic of Ireland's football league system, the League of Ireland, since 1985.

Norway

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Rosenborg (C) 30 64
2 Molde 30 59
3 Brann 30 58
4 Haugesund 30 53
5 Kristiansund 30 46
6 Vålerenga 30 42
7 Ranheim 30 42
8 Sarpsborg 08 30 41
9 Odd 30 40
10 Tromsø 30 36
11 Bodø/Glimt 30 32
12 Lillestrøm 30 32
13 Strømsgodset 30 31
14 Stabæk (O) 30 29
15 Start (R) 30 29
16 Sandefjord (R) 30 23
Source: Football Association of Norway (in Norwegian), Soccerway
(C) Champion; (O) Play-off winner; (R) Relegated.

Poland

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Lechia Gdańsk 26 53
2 Legia Warsaw 26 51
3 Piast Gliwice 26 46
4 Pogoń Szczecin 26 41
5 Jagiellonia Białystok 26 40
6 Lech Poznań 26 39
7 Cracovia 26 39
8 Korona Kielce 26 39
9 Wisła Kraków 26 38
10 Zagłębie Lubin 26 37
11 Śląsk Wrocław 26 27
12 Górnik Zabrze 26 27
13 Miedź Legnica 26 27
14 Arka Gdynia 26 26
15 Wisła Płock 26 24
16 Zagłębie Sosnowiec 26 18
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Ekstraklasa, 90minut

Portugal

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Madeira
Location of teams in 2018–19 Primeira Liga (Madeira)
List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Azores
Location of teams in 2018–19 Primeira Liga (Azores)


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Benfica 26 63
2 Porto 26 63
3 Braga 26 58
4 Sporting CP 26 55
5 Vitória de Guimarães 26 42
6 Moreirense 26 42
7 Belenenses SAD 26 38
8 Santa Clara 26 32
9 Rio Ave 26 32
10 Portimonense 26 32
11 Marítimo 26 27
12 Desportivo das Aves 26 26
13 Boavista 26 26
14 Nacional 26 26
15 Vitória de Setúbal 26 25
16 Tondela 26 25
17 Chaves 26 24
18 Feirense 26 15
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Liga Portugal

Republic of Ireland

Clubs and locations as of 2019 season:

Map of Dublin with the three League of Ireland Premier Division Dublin teams
Locations of Dublin Premier Division teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Dundalk (C) 36 87
2 Cork City 36 77
3 Shamrock Rovers 36 62
4 Waterford 36 59
5 St Patrick's Athletic 36 50
6 Bohemians 36 48
7 Sligo Rovers 36 42
8 Derry City 36 42
9 Limerick (R) 36 27
10 Bray Wanderers (R) 36 18
Source: SSE Airtricity League, Soccerway
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

Romania

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 CFR Cluj 26 54
2 FCSB 26 49
3 Universitatea Craiova 26 45
4 Astra Giurgiu 26 42
5 Viitorul Constanța 26 38
6 Sepsi Sfântu Gheorghe 26 37
7 Botoșani 26 36
8 Politehnica Iași 26 34
9 Dinamo București 26 32
10 Hermannstadt 26 32
11 Gaz Metan Mediaș 26 31
12 Dunărea Călărași 26 24
13 Voluntari 26 21
14 Concordia Chiajna 26 18
Source: LPF (in Romanian), Soccerway

Russia

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Russia with the teams of the 2018–19 Premier League
Yenisey (see below)
Yenisey
(see below)
Locations of teams in 2018–19 Russian Premier League
Map of Russia with the teams of the 2018–19 Premier League
Moscow
Moscow
Locations of teams in 2018–19 Russian Premier League


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Zenit Saint Petersburg 20 41
2 CSKA Moscow 20 36
3 Lokomotiv Moscow 20 35
4 Krasnodar 20 35
5 Spartak Moscow 20 33
6 Rostov 20 29
7 Rubin Kazan 20 28
8 Akhmat Grozny 20 27
9 Arsenal Tula 20 27
10 Orenburg 19 26
11 Krylia Sovetov Samara 19 24
12 Dynamo Moscow 20 23
13 Ural Yekaterinburg 20 23
14 Anzhi Makhachkala 20 18
15 Ufa 20 16
16 Yenisey Krasnoyarsk 20 11
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Russian Premier League, Soccerway

San Marino

This is a complete list of football clubs in San Marino (as San Marino has only one level domestic amateur league), apart from San Marino Calcio, the only professional Sammarinese club, which as of 2016–17 competes in Serie D, the fourth level of the Italian football league system.

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:[91]

Because there is no promotion or relegation in the league, the same 15 teams competed in the league.

2018–19 Campionato Sammarinese di Calcio team distribution

Scotland

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Celtic (X) 30 70
2 Rangers (X) 30 60
3 Aberdeen (X) 30 52
4 Kilmarnock (X) 30 51
5 Heart of Midlothian 30 47
6 Hibernian 30 45
7 Motherwell 30 40
8 Livingston 30 38
9 St Johnstone 29 38
10 Hamilton Academical (Y) 30 24
11 Dundee (Y) 30 18
12 St Mirren (Y) 29 17
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: BBC
(X) Assured of a top six place; (Y) Assured of a bottom six place.
Notes:
  1. ^ Teams play each other three times (33 matches), before the league is split into two groups (the top six and the bottom six).

Serbia

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Serbia
Belgrade
Belgrade
Novi Sad
Novi Sad
Belgrade clubs:
Belgrade clubs:
Novi Sad clubs:
Novi Sad clubs:
Locations of the 2018–19 Serbian SuperLiga teams


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Red Star Belgrade (Q) 27 75
2 Radnički Niš (Q) 27 68
3 Partizan (Q) 27 51
4 Čukarički (Q) 27 50
5 Mladost Lučani (Q) 27 42
6 Radnik Surdulica 27 35
7 Napredak Kruševac 27 35
8 Proleter Novi Sad 27 34
9 Mačva Šabac 27 31
10 Vojvodina 27 30
11 Spartak Subotica 27 29
12 Voždovac 27 28
13 Bačka Bačka Palanka 27 25
14 Rad (Q) 27 21
15 Dinamo Vranje (Q) 27 19
16 Zemun (Q) 27 18
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: SuperLiga (in Serbian), Soccerway
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.

Slovakia

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Slovan Bratislava 22 58
2 Žilina 22 44
3 DAC Dunajská Streda 22 44
4 Ružomberok 22 36
5 Zemplín Michalovce 22 32
6 Sereď 22 31
7 Nitra 22 26
8 Spartak Trnava 22 25
9 Trenčín 22 22
10 Železiarne Podbrezová 22 21
11 Senica 22 15
12 Zlaté Moravce 22 14
Updated to match(es) played on 9 March 2019. Source: Soccerway

Slovenia

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

Map of Slovenia with teams in the 2016–17 PrvaLiga
Location of teams in the 2018–19 Slovenian PrvaLiga


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Maribor 23 53
2 Olimpija Ljubljana 23 43
3 Domžale 23 34
4 Aluminij 23 33
5 Celje 23 33
6 Mura 23 29
7 Gorica 23 25
8 Triglav Kranj 23 25
9 Rudar Velenje 23 24
10 Krško 23 16
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: PrvaLiga (in Slovene), Soccerway, UEFA.com

Spain

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Community of Madrid
Location of Madrid teams in 2018–19 La Liga


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Barcelona 28 66
2 Atlético Madrid 28 56
3 Real Madrid 28 54
4 Getafe 28 46
5 Alavés 28 44
6 Sevilla 28 43
7 Valencia 28 40
8 Real Betis 28 39
9 Athletic Bilbao 28 37
10 Real Sociedad 28 36
11 Eibar 28 35
12 Girona 28 34
13 Espanyol 28 34
14 Leganés 28 33
15 Levante 28 31
16 Valladolid 28 29
17 Villarreal 28 29
18 Celta Vigo 28 25
19 Rayo Vallecano 28 23
20 Huesca 28 22
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: La Liga, Soccerway

Sweden

A Swedish championship was first organised in 1896, and the champions were decided by a knockout cup format until 1925, when Allsvenskan was formed.[96] Sweden was one of the founding members of UEFA in 1954.[97] As of the most recently completed 2017 season, Malmö FF have won the most national titles with 20, followed by IFK Göteborg with 18 and IFK Norrköping with 13. Malmö also have the most league titles, with 23 to 13 for both IFK Götebörg and IFK Norrköping. Since 2008,[98] Allsvenskan has featured 16 teams. They each play one another home and away, for a total of 30 games. The bottom two teams are relegated to the Superettan (The Super One), and the 14th-placed Allsvenskan team enters into a relegation playoff with the 3rd-placed Superettan team to decide which will play in Allsvenskan for the following season.[99]

Clubs and locations as of 2018 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 AIK (C) 30 67
2 IFK Norrköping 30 65
3 Malmö FF 30 58
4 Hammarby IF 30 58
5 BK Häcken 30 53
6 Östersunds FK 30 49
7 Djurgårdens IF 30 48
8 GIF Sundsvall 30 44
9 Örebro SK 30 35
10 Kalmar FF 30 34
11 IFK Göteborg 30 31
12 IF Elfsborg 30 30
13 IK Sirius 30 30
14 IF Brommapojkarna (R) 30 26
15 Dalkurd FF (R) 30 24
16 Trelleborgs FF (R) 30 15
Source: svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish)
(C) Champion; (R) Relegated.

Switzerland

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Young Boys 25 66
2 Basel 25 45
3 Thun 25 38
4 Zürich 25 33
5 Luzern 25 33
6 St. Gallen 25 31
7 Lugano 25 30
8 Sion 24 26
9 Xamax 25 22
10 Grasshopper 24 18
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Swiss Super League

Turkey

Turkish football operated on a regional basis until the 1950s. A national knockout tournament took place in 1957 and 1958, to decide European qualification. The Turkish Football Federation retrospectively recognised these tournaments as deciding the Turkish champions; both competitions were won by Beşiktaş J.K.[101] A national league was formed in 1959, and has been held annually from then onwards.[101] Since the formation of a national league, the most successful teams are Galatasaray and Fenerbahçe, with 20 and 19 league titles respectively as of the most recently completed 2016–17 season. Currently, 18 teams compete in the Süper Lig. Each team plays the other teams home and away, with the bottom three teams relegated to the TFF First League for the following season.[102]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 İstanbul Başakşehir 26 58
2 Galatasaray 26 52
3 Beşiktaş 26 47
4 Trabzonspor 26 43
5 Yeni Malatyaspor 26 37
6 Konyaspor 26 35
7 Antalyaspor 26 35
8 Çaykur Rizespor 26 34
9 Sivasspor 26 34
10 Kasımpaşa 26 34
11 Alanyaspor 26 34
12 Kayserispor 26 33
13 Fenerbahçe 26 31
14 Ankaragücü 26 31
15 Bursaspor 26 28
16 Göztepe 26 27
17 BB Erzurumspor 26 22
18 Akhisar Belediyespor 26 21
Updated to match(es) played on 17 March 2019. Source: Süper Lig, Soccerway

Ukraine

As a member of the Soviet Union, Ukraine's league operated as a feeder to the national Soviet leagues, meaning that until 1992 the strongest Ukrainian teams did not take part.[105] The Football Federation of Ukraine was formed shortly after the country achieved independence in 1991, and gained UEFA membership the following year.[106] Since the formation of a national league, FC Dynamo Kyiv have won 15 titles, FC Shakhtar Donetsk nine, and SC Tavriya Simferopol one, as of the most recently completed 2015–16 season.[105]

Through the 2013–14 season, 16 teams participated in the Premier League. However, during that season's winter break, the Euromaidan protests began, soon followed by Russia's annexation of the Crimean peninsula and the still-ongoing war in the country's east. These developments led to the league dropping to 14 teams in 2014–15 and 12 in 2016–17.

Beginning with the 2016–17 season, the league season is divided into two stages. In the first stage, the teams play one another home and away, after which the league splits into two groups, each playing a home-and-away schedule within the group and with table points carrying over intact. The top six teams play to determine the league champion and European qualifying spots, while the bottom six teams play to avoid relegation, with the bottom two at the end of the second stage dropping to the Ukrainian First League.[107][108]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:

List of top-division football clubs in UEFA countries is located in Ukraine
Home venues of teams in the 2018–19 Ukrainian Premier League.
Teams in italics are from a conflict zone of the War in Donbass and are playing their home games in different cities.


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Shakhtar Donetsk (Q) 22 57
2 Dynamo Kyiv (Q) 22 50
3 FC Oleksandriya (Q) 22 41
4 Zorya Luhansk (Q) 22 32
5 FC Lviv (Q) 22 30
6 FC Mariupol (Q) 22 30
7 Vorskla Poltava (Q) 22 29
8 Desna Chernihiv (Q) 22 28
9 Karpaty Lviv (Q) 22 21
10 Olimpik Donetsk (Q) 22 20
11 Chornomorets Odesa (Q) 22 16
12 Arsenal Kyiv (Q) 22 12
Updated to match(es) played on 18 March 2019. Source: Ukrainian Premier League Soccerway
(Q) Qualified to the phase indicated.
Notes:
  1. ^ Teams play each other twice (22 matches), before the league split into two groups (the top six and the bottom six) for the last 10 matches.

Wales

Although Wales joined UEFA in 1954, Welsh football operated on a regional basis until 1992, with no national championship.[110][111] Several Welsh clubs play not in the Welsh football league system, but in the English football league system. Currently, one Welsh club, Cardiff City, competes in the Premier League. Another Welsh club, Swansea City, was relegated to the second level, the EFL Championship, at the end of the 2017–18 season. Four other Welsh clubs participate lower down the English football league system: Newport County A.F.C., Wrexham F.C., Colwyn Bay F.C. and Merthyr Town F.C. Despite competing in Football Association competitions, the latter four are under the jurisdiction of the Football Association of Wales.[112] Until 2011 Swansea City and Cardiff City had similar arrangements with the FAW but are now under the jurisdiction of The Football Association.[113] The most successful Welsh club since the formation of the Welsh Premier League is The New Saints, with 12 league titles after having clinched their seventh straight league crown in 2017–18.[114] Since the 2010–11 season, the Welsh Premier League has featured 12 teams.[115] Relegation to and promotion from lower regional leagues is in part dictated by whether or not clubs can obtain a Premier League licence; only clubs able to obtain a licence are eligible for promotion, and clubs which fail to obtain one are relegated regardless of their final league position.[116]

Clubs and locations as of 2018–19 season:


Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Connah's Quay Nomads 28 58
2 The New Saints 26 56
3 Barry Town United 27 49
4 Newtown 28 43
5 Caernarfon Town 27 40
6 Bala Town 26 38
7 Cardiff Metropolitan University 27 39
8 Aberystwyth Town 27 37
9 Cefn Druids 27 29
10 Carmarthen Town 27 27
11 Llandudno 27 19
12 Llanelli Town 27 16
Updated to match(es) played on 16 March 2019. Source: Welsh Premier League,Soccerway
Notes:
  1. ^ Teams play each other twice (22 matches), before the league splits into two groups (the top six and the bottom six) for the last 10 matches.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Ornstein, David (8 December 2008). "Big four to feel wind of European change". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 July 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Gibraltar named 54th member of UEFA". UEFA. 24 May 2013. Retrieved 18 June 2013.
  3. ^ "Liechtenstein making strides". UEFA. 21 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  4. ^ "Solid foundations bolster San Marino". UEFA. 21 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  5. ^ a b c "Regulations of the UEFA Champions League 2010/11" (PDF). UEFA. pp. 41–48. Retrieved 16 August 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba 2018 rankings are used; these determine qualification for European competitions in the 2018–19 season. Kassies, Bert. "UEFA Country Ranking 2018". Retrieved 18 July 2018.
  7. ^ Boesenberg, Eric (19 May 2016). "Albania: List of champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  8. ^ "Member associations: Albania". UEFA. Retrieved 9 September 2012.
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