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List of extinct plants

The following is a list of extinct plants only.

Prehistoric extinctions

Extinct plants by geologic period

Den

Carboniferous

Permian

Triassic

Jurassic

Cretaceous

Paleocene

Eocene

Oligocene

Miocene

Pliocene

Pleistocene

Modern extinctions

Africa

Saint Helena Olive (Nesiota elliptica)
  • Acalypha rubrinervis (1870, Saint Helena)
  • Aspalathus complicata (1940s, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Aspalathus cordicarpa (1950s, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Aspalathus variegata (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Barleria natalensis (1900, South Africa) [35]
  • Brachystelma schoenlandianum (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Byttneria ivorensis (1896, Côte d'Ivoire)
  • Cephalophyllum parvulum (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Ceropegia antennifera (1910, South Africa) [35]
  • Ceropegia bowkeri (1900, South Africa) [35]
  • Coffea lemblinii (1907, Côte d'Ivoire)
  • Conophytum semivestitum (1900, South Africa) [35]
  • Crassula subulata (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Cyclopia filiformis (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Disa forcipata (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Dryopteris ascensionis (1889, Ascension Island)
  • Erica alexandri subsp. acockii (1940, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Erica foliacea subsp. fulgens (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Erica pyramidalis var. pyramidalis (1910, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Eugenia pusilla (1920, South Africa) [35]
  • Helichrysum outeniquense (1950, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Saint Helena HeliotropeHeliotropium pannifolium (1808, Saint Helena)
  • Isolepis bulbifera (1950, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Lampranthus vanzijliae (1920, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Leucadendron grandiflorum (1805, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Leucadendron spirale (1930, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Liparia graminifolia (1830, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Macledium pretoriense (1925, South Africa) [35]
  • Macrostylis villosa subsp. minor (1980, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Nemesia micrantha (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Saint Helena OliveNesiota elliptica (2003, Saint Helena)
  • Oldenlandia adscensionis (1889, Ascension Island)
  • Orchidea eupolyanthis (1910, Cameroon)
  • Osteospermum hirsutum (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Pausinystalia brachythyrsum (1898, Cameroon)
  • Polhillia ignota (1950s, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Psoralea cataracta (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Psoralea gueinzii (1930, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • SilphiumFerula ? (c. 50, Cyrene)
  • Sporobolus durus (1886, Ascension Island)
  • Thamnea depressa (1900, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Trochetiopsis melanoxylon (1771, Saint Helena)
  • Vernonella africana (1900, South Africa) [35]
  • Willdenowia affinis (1920, South Africa: Cape Flora) [35]
  • Xysmalobium baurii (1900, South Africa) [35]

Americas

Asia

Europe

Oceania

Plants extinct in the wild

Encephalartos woodii
Cosmos atrosanguineus
Sophora toromiro

Africa

Americas

Asia

Europe

Oceania

Extinct plant cultivars

The "Ansault" pear
  • "Ansault" – pear cultivar
  • Semper augustus – tulip traded during tulip mania
  • "Taliaferro" – apple cultivar
  • "Viceroy" – tulip traded during tulip mania

Plants previously thought extinct and subsequently rediscovered

See Lazarus species

  • Badula ovalifolia – from Mauritius. Known in 1830's; collected in 1970 and 1997 but misidentified (Page and D'Argent 1997, IUCN report)/confirmed identity in 2008 (Florens et al., Kew Bulletin)
  • Café marron (Ramosmania rodriguesii) – rediscovered on Rodrigues in 1979
  • Jellyfish tree (Medusagyne oppositifolia) – rediscovered in Seychelles in the 1970s
  • Sichuan Thuja (Thuja sutchuenensis) – rediscovered 1999 (Sichuan, China)
  • Gibraltar Campion (Silene tomentosa) – rediscovered on Gibraltar in 1994
  • Astragalus nitidiflorus (1909, Spain) – rediscovered 2004 (Cartagena, Spain)

Extinct algae

See also

References

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  2. ^ a b c Mary Gordon Calder (1953). "A coniferous petrified forest in Patagonia". Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Geology. 2 (2): 97–138.
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  4. ^ a b Bogner, J.; Johnson, K. R.; Kvacek, Z.; Upchurch, G. R. (2007). "New fossil leaves of Araceae from the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene of western North America" (PDF). Zitteliana. A (47): 133–147. ISSN 1612-412X.
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  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an [redlist.sanbi.org] Red List of South African Plants
  36. ^ [sabs.appstate.edu] Newsletter of the Southern Appalachia Botanical Society
  37. ^ IUCN (September 4, 2016). "Four out of six great apes one step away from extinction – IUCN Red List". Archived from the original on September 8, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

External links