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List of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in Kent

River Beult
The River Beult north-east of Paddock Wood

Kent is a county in the south-eastern corner of England. It is bounded to the north by Greater London and the Thames Estuary, to the west by Sussex and Surrey, and to the south and east by the English channel and the North Sea. The county town is Maidstone.[1] It is governed by Kent County Council, with twelve district councils, Ashford, Canterbury, Dartford, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe, Gravesham, Maidstone, Thanet, Tonbridge and Malling and Tunbridge Wells. Medway is a separate unitary authority.[2][3] The chalk hills of the North Downs run from east to west through the county, with the wooded Weald to the south. The coastline is alternately flat and cliff-lined.[1]

In England, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) are designated by Natural England, which is responsible for protecting England's natural environment. Designation as an SSSI gives legal protection to the most important wildlife and geological sites.[4] As of May 2018, there are 98 sites designated in Kent.[5] There are 21 sites which have been designated for their geological interest, 67 for their biological interest, and 10 for both reasons.

Sixteen sites are Special Areas of Conservation, eight are Special Protection Areas, twenty-three are Nature Conservation Review sites, thirty-three are Geological Conservation Review sites, eleven are National Nature Reserves, nine are Ramsar internationally important wetland sites, eleven are Local Nature Reserves, thirteen are in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, one is on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England and two contain Scheduled Monuments. Seventeen sites are managed by the Kent Wildlife Trust, four by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and seven by the National Trust.

Key

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Sites

Site name Photograph B G Area[a] Public access Location[a] Other classifications Map[b] Citation[c] Description
Alex Farm Pastures Alex Farm Pastures Green tickY 4.5 hectares
(11 acres)
[6]
NO Ashford
51°05′49″N 0°48′22″E / 51.097°N 0.806°E / 51.097; 0.806 (Alex Farm Pastures)
TQ 966 368
[6]
Map Citation This site has unimproved neutral grassland, which is a nationally rare habitat. Some of it has been lost to scrub, but in other areas it is maintained by rabbit grazing. There are several uncommon butterflies, including the nationally scarce pearl-bordered fritillary and small pearl-bordered fritillary.[7]
Alkham, Lydden and Swingfield Woods Alkham, Lydden and Swingfield Woods Green tickY 228.3 hectares
(564 acres)
[8]
PP Dover
51°08′53″N 1°13′48″E / 51.148°N 1.23°E / 51.148; 1.23 (Alkham, Lydden and Swingfield Woods)
TR 260 437
[8]
NCR[9] Map Citation This site is composed of several steeply sloping woods on chalk soil, together with an area of chalk grassland. The ground flora is diverse, including some unusual plants such as lady orchid in the woods and burnt orchid in the meadow.[10]
Allington Quarry Allington Quarry Green tickY 0.8 hectares
(2.0 acres)
[11]
NO Maidstone
51°17′24″N 0°29′53″E / 51.29°N 0.498°E / 51.29; 0.498 (Allington Quarry)
TQ 743 575
[11]
GCR[12] Map Citation This Pleistocene site has an extensive section through gulls (cracks in the rock) which are filled with loess. These were probably produced by seasonal freezing and thawing during the last ice age.[13]
Aylesford Pit Aylesford Pit Green tickY 1.5 hectares
(3.7 acres)
[14]
NO Aylesford
51°18′29″N 0°28′52″E / 51.308°N 0.481°E / 51.308; 0.481 (Aylesford Pit)
TQ 730 595
[14]
GCR[15] Map Citation This Pleistocene site in the terrace of the River Medway has yielded many mammalian bones and paleolithic artefacts, but its geographical isolation from the main Thames sequence makes precise correlation of Aylesford rocks with those laid down at the same time in Thames sites uncertain.[16]
Baker's Hole Bakers Hole Green tickY 6.9 hectares
(17 acres)
[17]
NO Swanscombe
51°26′38″N 0°19′01″E / 51.444°N 0.317°E / 51.444; 0.317 (Baker's Hole)
TQ 611 742
[17]
GCR[18] Map Citation This internationally renowned site has yielded the largest number of stone tools and flakes in Britain dating to the Early Middle Paleolithic (325,000 to 180,000 year ago). Most of them were produced by Neanderthals using the Levallois technique.[19][20]
Bourne Alder Carr Bourne Alder Carr Green tickY 13.5 hectares
(33 acres)
[21]
PP Sevenoaks
51°16′16″N 0°18′04″E / 51.271°N 0.301°E / 51.271; 0.301 (Bourne Alder Carr)
TQ 606 549
[21]
Map Citation The River Bourne runs through a shallow valley, and frequent flushing of the woodland on the banks with water rich in nutrients creates a rich ground flora. There is also an area of swamp around a fish pond.[22]
Brookland Wood Brookland Wood Green tickY 10.9 hectares
(27 acres)
[23]
PP Tunbridge Wells
51°07′26″N 0°22′16″E / 51.124°N 0.371°E / 51.124; 0.371 (Brookland Wood)
TQ 660 387
[23]
Map Citation This site has diverse types of woodland and ground flora. Alder is dominant in wet areas and hazel, ash and field maple in drier ones. Small streams have a variety of mosses and liverworts.[24]
Charing Beech Hangers Charing Beech Hangers Green tickY 52.6 hectares
(130 acres)
[25]
PP Ashford
51°12′04″N 0°49′52″E / 51.201°N 0.831°E / 51.201; 0.831 (Charing Beech Hangers)
TQ 979 484
[25]
Map Citation This steeply sloping site has mature beech and oak, and the ground flora is varied with some uncommon species. Invertebrates include the rare slug Limax tenellus and several scarce moths.[26]
Chattenden Woods and Lodge Hill Great Chattenden Wood Green tickY 351.0 hectares
(867 acres)
[27]
PP Rochester
51°25′55″N 0°31′30″E / 51.432°N 0.525°E / 51.432; 0.525 (Chattenden Woods and Lodge Hill)
TQ 756 734
[27]
Map Citation This site has diverse habitats, including ancient semi-natural woodland, grassland and scrub. There are nationally important numbers of nightingales in the woods and scrub during the breeding season, and invertebrates include nationally scarce moths.[28]
Chequer's Wood and Old Park Chequer's Wood and Old Park Green tickY Green tickY 106.9 hectares
(264 acres)
[29]
NO Canterbury
51°17′06″N 1°06′54″E / 51.285°N 1.115°E / 51.285; 1.115 (Chequer's Wood and Old Park)
TR 173 586
[29]
GCR[30] Map Citation This site includes Fordwich Pit, which has yielded a large collection of early Acheulian handaxes, between 550,000 and 300,000 old. Habitats include alder wood in a valley bottom, acidic grassland on dry sandy soil, oak and birch woodland, scrub and a pond.[31][32]
Church Woods, Blean Church Woods, Blean Green tickY 526.7 hectares
(1,302 acres)
[33]
YES Canterbury
51°18′04″N 1°00′54″E / 51.301°N 1.015°E / 51.301; 1.015 (Church Woods, Blean)
TR 103 601
[33]
NCR,[34] NNR,[35][36] RSPB,[37] SAC[38] Map Citation This broadleaved coppice with standards wood has a diverse range of trees, a rich ground flora, a wide variety of birds and many uncommon invertebrates, including the nationally rare heath fritillary butterfly.[39]
Cobham Woods Cobham Woods Green tickY 242.7 hectares
(600 acres)
[40]
YES Rochester
51°23′17″N 0°26′20″E / 51.388°N 0.439°E / 51.388; 0.439 (Cobham Woods)
TQ 698 683
[40]
AONB,[41] NT[42] Map Citation These woods are partly on acidic Thanet Sands and partly on chalk soils. There is also an area of arable land which has some uncommon plants, including the very rare and protected rough marsh-mallow, which has been recorded on the site since 1792.[43]
Combwell Wood Combwell Wood Green tickY 110.6 hectares
(273 acres)
[44]
FP Cranbrook
51°04′52″N 0°26′02″E / 51.081°N 0.434°E / 51.081; 0.434 (Combwell Wood)
TQ 706 341
[44]
AONB[45] Map Citation Much of this ancient wood has traditionally been coppiced, but there has probably been undisturbed woodland on steep slopes, and uncommon bryophytes here are thought to be survivors from the Atlantic warm period around 5,000 years ago. There are also several nationally scarce water beetles.[46]
Cowden Meadow owden Meadow Green tickY 1.1 hectares
(2.7 acres)
[47]
FP Edenbridge
51°09′11″N 0°06′54″E / 51.153°N 0.115°E / 51.153; 0.115 (Cowden Meadow)
TQ 480 414
[47]
Map Citation This site has flora which are found on grassland sites which have not been cultivated for many years, such as quaking grass, oxeye daisy and pepper saxifrage. Wetter areas are dominated by hard rush.[48]
Cowden Pound Pastures Cowden Pound Pastures Green tickY 5.9 hectares
(15 acres)
[49]
NO Edenbridge
51°10′08″N 0°05′10″E / 51.169°N 0.086°E / 51.169; 0.086 (Cowden Pound Pastures)
TQ 459 432
[49]
KWT[50] Map Citation This is unimproved neutral grassland, which is a nationally rare habitat, and it is grazed to prevent scrub invading the pasture. Grasses include crested dog's tail and common knapweed, and an area of wet grassland by a stream has jointed rush and water mint.[51]
Dalham Farm Dalham Farm Green tickY 8.8 hectares
(22 acres)
[52]
PP Rochester
51°26′56″N 0°33′25″E / 51.449°N 0.557°E / 51.449; 0.557 (Dalham Farm)
TQ 778 753
[52]
GCR[53] Map Citation The farm shows mass movement of rock and soil on a shallow 8% slope of London Clay, which is seen in ridges across the site. It may be the lowest angled slope failure in Britain, and is important in demonstrating slope degradation where there is no coastal erosion.[54]
Darenth Wood Darenth Wood Green tickY 122.9 hectares
(304 acres)
[55]
YES Dartford
51°25′34″N 0°16′01″E / 51.426°N 0.267°E / 51.426; 0.267 (Darenth Wood)
TQ 577 721
[55]
Map Citation This ancient semi-natural wood has many rare invertebrates, including thirty-two which are nationally scarce and two which are nationally rare: these are beetles which live in dead and dying oak timber, Grilis pannonicus and Platypus cylindricus.[56]
Dover to Kingsdown Cliffs Dover to Kingsdown Cliffs Green tickY Green tickY 207.7 hectares
(513 acres)
[57]
YES Dover
51°08′46″N 1°22′16″E / 51.146°N 1.371°E / 51.146; 1.371 (Dover to Kingsdown Cliffs)
TR 359 439
[57]
GCR,[58] NT,[59] SAC[60] Map Citation The cliffs expose fossiliferous rocks dating to 99 and 86 million years ago, during the Late Cretaceous, which are historically important as many geological principles were tested there. The cliffs have many breeding sea birds, and there are diverse algae on the foreshore.[61]
Down Bank Down Bank Green tickY 5.9 hectares
(15 acres)
[62]
FP Canterbury
51°13′48″N 0°58′55″E / 51.23°N 0.982°E / 51.23; 0.982 (Down Bank)
TR 083 521
[62]
Map Citation This sloping chalk meadow has the nationally endangered black-veined moth and twenty-eight species of butterfly, including the nationally scarce Duke of Burgundy. Grassland flora include two nationally scarce species, small bedstraw and man orchid.[63]
Dryhill Dryhill Green tickY 11.7 hectares
(29 acres)
[64]
YES Sevenoaks
51°16′34″N 0°08′56″E / 51.276°N 0.149°E / 51.276; 0.149 (Dryhill)
TQ 500 552
[64]
GCR,[65] LNR[66] Map Citation This former quarry exposes rocks dating to the Aptian stage in the early Cretaceous, around 120 million years ago. It is famous for its rich and diverse brachiopod and bivalve fossils, which are important for palaeoecological research.[67]
Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay Green tickY Green tickY 10,172.9 hectares
(25,138 acres)
[68]
PP Romney Marsh
50°56′46″N 0°51′25″E / 50.946°N 0.857°E / 50.946; 0.857 (Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay)
TR 008 202
[68]
AONB,[68] GCR,[69] KWT,[70] LNR,[71] NNR,[36][72] Ramsar,[73] RSPB,[74] SAC,[75] SPA[76] Map[d] Citation Nationally important habitats in this site are saltmarsh, sand dunes, vegetated shingle, saline lagoons, standing waters, lowland ditch systems, and basin fens, and it has many rare and endangered species of fauna and flora. It is geologically important as its deposits display the chronology of coastal evolution.[77]
East Blean Woods East Blean Woods Green tickY 151.3 hectares
(374 acres)
[78]
YES Canterbury
51°20′06″N 1°08′24″E / 51.335°N 1.14°E / 51.335; 1.14 (East Blean Woods)
TR 188 642
[78]
KWT,[79] NCR,[34] NNR[35][36] SAC[38] Map Citation This site has mixed coppice with some mature oaks. Insects include the rare and protected heath fritillary butterfly, and there is a wide variety of woodland birds.[80]
Ellenden Wood Ellenden Wood Green tickY 90.6 hectares
(224 acres)
[81]
YES Whitstable
51°19′19″N 1°00′50″E / 51.322°N 1.014°E / 51.322; 1.014 (Ellenden Wood)
TR 101 624
[81]
NCR,[82] SAC[38] Map Citation This wood has diverse flora with over 250 species of vascular plants and 300 of fungi. Insects include 3 species which are nationally rare, and there are mammals such as wood mice, dormice and two species of shrew.[83]
Farningham Wood Farningham Wood Green tickY 74.2 hectares
(183 acres)
[84]
YES Dartford
51°23′28″N 0°12′47″E / 51.391°N 0.213°E / 51.391; 0.213 (Farningham Wood)
TQ 541 681
[84]
LNR[85] Map Citation This wood has a variety of soil conditions, resulting in diverse ground flora and invertebrates, some of which are typical ancient woodland. Ponds in the middle support several species of amphibian, and the nationally rare hoverfly Volucella inanis has been recorded on the site.[86]
Folkestone to Etchinghill Escarpment Folkestone to Etchinghill Escarpment Green tickY Green tickY 263.2 hectares
(650 acres)
[87]
PP Folkestone
51°06′11″N 1°07′48″E / 51.103°N 1.13°E / 51.103; 1.13 (Folkestone to Etchinghill Escarpment)
TR 192 384
[87]
GCR,[88][89] NCR,[90] SAC[91] Map Citation A large area of chalk grassland has three nationally rare plants, late spider orchid, early spider orchid and bedstraw broomrape. Asholt Wood has outstanding lichen flora. The site also includes Holywell Coombe, a key geological site displaying the sequence of mollusc fossils in the late Pleistocene and Holocene.[92]
Folkestone Warren Folkestone Warren Green tickY Green tickY 316.3 hectares
(782 acres)
[93]
PP Folkestone
51°05′56″N 1°14′13″E / 51.099°N 1.237°E / 51.099; 1.237 (Folkestone Warren)
TR 267 383
[93]
GCR,[58][94][95][96] LNR,[97] NCR[98] Map Citation These chalk cliffs have several nationally rare plants and they provide a location for cliff nesting and wintering birds. The SSSI also contains two internationally important reference sites for study of the Cretaceous period.[99]
Gibbin's Brook Gibbin's Brook Green tickY 16.8 hectares
(42 acres)
[100]
YES Ashford
51°06′25″N 1°01′16″E / 51.107°N 1.021°E / 51.107; 1.021 (Gibbin's Brook)
TR 116 385
[100]
Map Citation This site is mainly marshy grassland, but it also has a stream, a pond and small areas of bog and dry acidic grassland. It is notable for its invertebrates, especially moths.[101]
Great Crabbles Wood Great Crabbles Wood Green tickY 33.0 hectares
(82 acres)
[102]
YES Gravesend
51°24′22″N 0°26′46″E / 51.406°N 0.446°E / 51.406; 0.446 (Great Crabbles Wood)
TQ 702 703
[102]
Map Citation Most of the wood is mixed coppice, with sweet chestnut dominant and oak standards. There are scarce flora such as lady and man and bird's nest orchids, white helleborine and wild liquorice.[103]
Great Shuttlesfield Down Great Shuttlesfield Down Green tickY 21.8 hectares
(54 acres)
[104]
FP Folkestone
51°07′34″N 1°06′29″E / 51.126°N 1.108°E / 51.126; 1.108 (Great Shuttlesfield Down)
TR 176 409
[104]
Map Citation This unimproved grassland is dominated by sheep's fescue, upright brome and tor-grass, and it is grazed by sheep and cattle. Notable invertebrates are the rare adonis blue butterfly and two solitary wasps, Crossocerus cetratus and Crossocerus styrius.[105]
Greatness Brickworks Greatness Brickworks Green tickY 7.8 hectares
(19 acres)
[106]
NO Sevenoaks
51°17′53″N 0°12′00″E / 51.298°N 0.200°E / 51.298; 0.200 (Greatness Brickworks)
TQ 535 577
[106]
GCR,[107] Map Citation This Cretaceous site is highly fossiliferous, with many ammonites. It is described by Natural England as "of vital importance in biostratigraphic research on the Gault of the Weald".[108]
Halling to Trottiscliffe Escarpment Halling to Trottiscliffe Escarpment Green tickY 600.6 hectares
(1,484 acres)
[109]
PP Rochester
51°21′00″N 0°24′14″E / 51.350°N 0.404°E / 51.350; 0.404 (Halling to Trottiscliffe Escarpment)
TQ 675 640
[109]
NCR,[110] SAC[111] Map Citation This site on the North Downs has grassland and beech woodland on chalk soil. It is entomologically important, with uncommon insects such as the bug Psylla viburni, and it is the only known location in Britain for the moth Hypercallia citrinalis.[112]
Ham Street Woods Ham Street Woods Green tickY 175.2 hectares
(433 acres)
[113]
YES Ashford
51°04′23″N 0°51′58″E / 51.073°N 0.866°E / 51.073; 0.866 (Ham Street Woods)
TR 009 343
[113]
NCR,[114] NNR[36][115] Map Citation This semi-natural wood is more than 400 years old, and it has rich and diverse invertebrates, including 12 rare or scarce dead wood species, such as the nationally rare beetle, Tomoxia biguttata.[116]
Hart Hill Hart Hill Green tickY 1.4 hectares
(3.5 acres)
[117]
NO Ashford
51°13′19″N 0°46′48″E / 51.222°N 0.780°E / 51.222; 0.780 (Hart Hill)
TQ 942 506
[117]
GCR[118] Map Citation This site is controversial as it exposes the Lenham Beds, the date of which have been disputed, but they are now thought to be Pliocene on the basis of their marine bivalves and gastropods.[119]
Hatch Park Hatch Park Green tickY 71.8 hectares
(177 acres)
[120]
NO Ashford
51°07′44″N 0°56′46″E / 51.129°N 0.946°E / 51.129; 0.946 (Hatch Park)
TR 062 408
[120]
RHPG[121] Map Citation This site has species-rich acidic grassland which is the remnant of a larger deer park, and is still managed by a herd of deer. There are also ancient pollard woods which are the richest for epiphytic lichens in the county. Several ponds have adjacent areas of marsh.[122]
High Rocks High Rocks Green tickY 3.3 hectares
(8.2 acres)
[123]
PP Tunbridge Wells
51°06′47″N 0°13′34″E / 51.113°N 0.226°E / 51.113; 0.226 (High Rocks)
TQ 559 383
[123]
GCR[124] Map[d] Citation This Pleistocene site is described by Natural England as "a key geomorphological site for sandstone weathering features developed on the highest cliffs in the Weald". The Ardingly Sandstone has micro-cracking of unknown origin.[125]
Hoad's Wood Hoad's Wood Green tickY 80.5 hectares
(199 acres)
[126]
NO Ashford
51°08′53″N 0°47′24″E / 51.148°N 0.790°E / 51.148; 0.790 (Hoad's Wood)
TQ 952 425
[126]
Map Citation This oak and hornbeam wood is outstanding for its insects, especially butterflies and moths, with two which are nationally rare, the broad-bordered beehawk and black-veined moths. There are diverse breeding birds.[127]
Holborough to Burham Marshes Holborough to Burham Marshes Green tickY 149.8 hectares
(370 acres)
[128]
YES Snodland
51°19′41″N 0°27′22″E / 51.328°N 0.456°E / 51.328; 0.456 (Holborough to Burham Marshes)
TQ 712 616
[128]
KWT[129] Map Citation This site is in the tidal flood plain of the River Medway. It has diverse habitats, with reedbeds, fen, grassland, woodland, scrub and a flooded gravel pit, which attracts wintering wildfowl. There are five rare invertebrates, including three bee species.[130]
Hollingbourne Downs Hollingbourne Downs Green tickY 60.9 hectares
(150 acres)
[131]
YES Maidstone
51°16′12″N 0°38′56″E / 51.270°N 0.649°E / 51.270; 0.649 (Hollingbourne Downs)
TQ 849 557
[131]
Map Citation This escarpment has unimproved chalk grassland and beech woodland. The dominant grasses are tor-grass, upright brome and sheep's fescue, and shrub species on woodland margins include the wayfaring-tree and traveller's-joy.[132]
Hothfield Common Hothfield Common Green tickY 56.5 hectares
(140 acres)
[133]
YES Ashford
51°10′41″N 0°48′50″E / 51.178°N 0.814°E / 51.178; 0.814 (Hothfield Common)
TQ 968 458
[133]
KWT,[134] LNR[135] Map Citation This site has areas of heath and the best valley bog in the county, both habitats which are uncommon in Kent. Over a thousand insect species have been recorded, several of which are nationally rare, such as the bee Lasioglossum semilucens and the cranefly Tipula holoptera.[136]
Houlder and Monarch Hill Pits, Upper Halling Houlder and Monarch Hill Pits Green tickY 0.7 hectares
(1.7 acres)
[137]
NO Rochester
51°20′42″N 0°25′30″E / 51.345°N 0.425°E / 51.345; 0.425 (Houlder and Monarch Hill Pits, Upper Halling)
TQ 690 634
[137]
GCR[138] Map Citation This site has a sequence of deposits covering the end of the last glacial period, with two sheets of glacial deposits separated by a fossil soil assigned to the late glacial interstadial around 13,000 years ago. It provides evidence of lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic changes during this period.[139]
Hubbard's Hill Hubbard's Hill Green tickY 66.6 hectares
(165 acres)
[140]
YES Sevenoaks
51°14′49″N 0°11′46″E / 51.247°N 0.196°E / 51.247; 0.196 (Hubbard's Hill)
TQ 534 520
[140]
GCR[141] Map Citation This Quaternary site exhibits solifluction (erosion by freezing and thawing). The main deposits date to the Wolstonian glaciation around 130,000 years ago, but the latest have radiocarbon dates of only 12,500 years, during the most recent Younger Dryas ice age.[142]
Ileden and Oxenden Woods Ileden and Oxenden Woods Green tickY 86.4 hectares
(213 acres)
[143]
YES Canterbury
51°13′41″N 1°10′30″E / 51.228°N 1.175°E / 51.228; 1.175 (Ileden and Oxenden Woods)
TR 218 524
[143]
Map Citation These woods have a variety of soil types and diverse habitats. There is a rich bird community and ground flora, including two nationally rare orchids, narrow-lipped helleborine and lady orchid.[144]
Knole Park Knole Park Green tickY 383.4 hectares
(947 acres)
[145]
YES Sevenoaks
51°15′43″N 0°12′36″E / 51.262°N 0.210°E / 51.262; 0.210 (Knole Park)
TQ 543 538
[145]
AONB.[146]NT[147] Map Citation The park has acidic woodland, parkland, woods and ponds. It has the best ancient woodland invertebrates in the county, including the nationally rare beetle Platypus cylindrus and several nationally scarce species, and it also has a rich fungus flora.[146]
Larkey Valley Wood Larkey Valley Wood Green tickY 44.1 hectares
(109 acres)
[148]
YES Canterbury
51°15′25″N 1°02′38″E / 51.257°N 1.044°E / 51.257; 1.044 (Larkey Valley Wood)
TR 125 553
[148]
LNR[149] Map Citation This wood has diverse ground flora with some uncommon plants and many breeding birds, such as tree pipits, nuthatches and hawfinches. Flora include the scarce lady orchid.[150]
Lenham Quarry Lenham Quarry Green tickY 4.0 hectares
(9.9 acres)
[151]
YES Maidstone
51°14′24″N 0°44′28″E / 51.240°N 0.741°E / 51.240; 0.741 (Lenham Quarry)
TQ 914 525
[151]
GCR[152] Map Citation This site has been assigned to the Pliocene on the basis of its gastropod, bivalve and serpulid worm fossils. It is important because there are few exposures dating from this period in Britain.[153]
Lullingstone Park Lullingstone Park Green tickY 66.4 hectares
(164 acres)
[154]
YES Sevenoaks
51°21′18″N 0°10′16″E / 51.355°N 0.171°E / 51.355; 0.171 (Lullingstone Park)
TQ 513 640
[154]
SM,[155] Map Citation Some of the pollards in this wood are over 400 years old, and it is important for invertebrates, lichens, breeding birds and fungi. Over 340 beetle species have been recorded, including two which are nationally rare.[156]
Lydden and Temple Ewell Downs Lydden and Temple Ewell Downs Green tickY 63.2 hectares
(156 acres)
[157]
YES Dover
51°09′43″N 1°15′07″E / 51.162°N 1.252°E / 51.162; 1.252 (Lydden and Temple Ewell Downs)
TR 275 453
[157]
AONB,[158] KWT[159] NCR,[157] NNR[36][160] SAC[161] Map Citation This site has some of the richest chalk downland in the county. The invertebrate community is outstanding, including butterflies such as marbled whites, adonis blue and the very rare silver-spotted skipper.[158]
Lympne Escarpment Lympne Escarpment Green tickY 140.2 hectares
(346 acres)
[162]
PP Hythe
51°04′12″N 1°01′48″E / 51.070°N 1.030°E / 51.070; 1.030 (Lympne Escarpment)
TR 124 344
[162]
SM.[163] Map Citation This steeply sloping site has woodland and grassland on Kentish ragstone, with many springs and flushes at the base. It is close to the sea, and the resulting high humidity allows plants such as stinking iris, which are usually confined to woods, to grow in grassland.[164]
Lynsore Bottom Lynsore Bottom Green tickY 70.6 hectares
(174 acres)
[165]
YES Canterbury
51°11′20″N 1°05′24″E / 51.189°N 1.090°E / 51.189; 1.090 (Lynsore Bottom)
TR 160 479
[165]
Map Citation These coppice with standards woods have a variety of tree species. The ground flora is diverse, and the woods are also important for their breeding birds, including tawny owls, grasshopper warblerss and hawfinches.[166]
Magpie Bottom Magpie Bottom Green tickY 51.9 hectares
(128 acres)
[167]
YES Sevenoaks
51°19′44″N 0°12′58″E / 51.329°N 0.216°E / 51.329; 0.216 (Magpie Bottom)
TQ 545 612
[167]
Map Citation This steeply sloping area of chalk grassland has diverse herb flora, including the nationally rare Kentish milkwort and seven species of orchid, such as the scarce man orchid. There are also areas of woodland and scrub.[168]
Marden Meadows Marden Meadow Green tickY 3.7 hectares
(9.1 acres)
[169]
PP Tonbridge
51°10′23″N 0°31′05″E / 51.173°N 0.518°E / 51.173; 0.518 (Marden Meadows)
TQ 761 445
[169]
KWT[170] Map Citation These unimproved neutral meadows are cut for hay each year and then grazed. There are also ponds and hedgerows which are probably of ancient origin, and trees include midland hawthorns and wild service-trees.[171]
Medway Estuary and Marshes Medway Estuary and Marshes Green tickY 4,478.8 hectares
(11,067 acres)
[172]
PP Sittingbourne
51°24′29″N 0°39′25″E / 51.408°N 0.657°E / 51.408; 0.657 (Medway Estuary and Marshes)
TQ 849 710
[172]
NCR,[173] Ramsar,[174] SPA[175] Map Citation This site is internationally important for its wintering birds, and nationally important for its breeding birds. It is also has an outstanding flora, such as the nationally rare oak-leaved goosefoot and the nationally scarce slender hare’s-ear.[176]
Northward Hill Northward Hill Green tickY 52.5 hectares
(130 acres)
[177]
YES Rochester
51°27′25″N 0°33′43″E / 51.457°N 0.562°E / 51.457; 0.562 (Northward Hill)
TQ 781 762
[177]
NCR,[178] NNR,[36][179] RSPB.[180] Map Citation This site has mixed woodland, scrub, ponds, grassland and bracken. It has the largest heronry in Britain, with more than 200 pairs, and insects include the scarce sloe carpet and least carpet moths.[181]
Oaken Wood Oaken Wood Green tickY 18.7 hectares
(46 acres)
[182]
YES Maidstone
51°16′01″N 0°26′13″E / 51.267°N 0.437°E / 51.267; 0.437 (Oaken Wood)
TQ 701 548
[182]
GCR,[183] Map Citation This site provides the best example of a very unusual topography, with cracking and tilting of underlying weaker strata during the Pleistocene by periglacial processes producing crests and troughs in the surface rocks.[184]
Oldbury and Seal Chart Oldbury and Seal Chart Green tickY 212.4 hectares
(525 acres)
[185]
YES Sevenoaks
51°16′44″N 0°15′18″E / 51.279°N 0.255°E / 51.279; 0.255 (Oldbury and Seal Chart)
TQ 574 557
[185]
AONB,[186] NT[187] Map Citation More than 250 species of fungi have been recorded in this site, including 10 which are rare or scarce. There are also molluscs which are characteristic of ancient woodland, including the rare snail Phenacolumax major and the scarce slug Limax tenellus.[186]
One Tree Hill and Bitchet Common One Tree Hill and Bitchet Common Green tickY 79.2 hectares
(196 acres)
[188]
YES Sevenoaks
51°15′29″N 0°14′38″E / 51.258°N 0.244°E / 51.258; 0.244 (One Tree Hill and Bitchet Common)
TQ 567 534
[188]
AONB,[189] NT[190] Map Citation This site has mixed woodland on the Lower Greensand, some of it of ancient origin. The habitats are varied, including acidic soils on Bitchet Common and damp, base-rich soils in Martins Wood. There are several rare plants and invertebrates.[189]
Orlestone Forest Orlestone Forest Green tickY 347.6 hectares
(859 acres)
[191]
PP Ashford
51°04′48″N 0°49′48″E / 51.080°N 0.830°E / 51.080; 0.830 (Orlestone Forest)
TQ 983 350
[191]
NCR[114] Map Citation This site is described by Natural England as "an important invertebrate locality of national significance". Hundreds of invertebrate species have been recorded, including 39 which are nationally rare and 134 which are nationally scarce. Several are only known in Britain on this site.[192]
Otford to Shoreham Downs Otford to Shoreham Downs Green tickY 145.1 hectares
(359 acres)
[193]
PP Sevenoaks
51°20′06″N 0°11′56″E / 51.335°N 0.199°E / 51.335; 0.199 (Otford to Shoreham Downs)
TQ 533 618
[193]
AONB,[193] KWT[194] Map Citation These downs have woodland, scrub and species-rich chalk grassland, which has been traditionally managed by grazing. A decline in grazing has caused the chalk downland to become overgrown, but it is still very species diverse, with over a hundred plants recorded.[195]
Otterpool Quarry Otterpool Quarry Green tickY 10.2 hectares
(25 acres)
[196]
NO Lympne
51°05′17″N 1°00′50″E / 51.088°N 1.014°E / 51.088; 1.014 (Otterpool Quarry)
TR 112 364
[196]
GCR[197] Map Citation This quarry exposes rocks dating to the Cretaceous period, and shows the contact between the Hythe and Sandgate beds. It is very rich in fossil ammonites, with species which can be correlated elsewhere.[198]
Park Wood, Chilham Park Wood, Chilham Green tickY 31.1 hectares
(77 acres)
[199]
YES Canterbury
51°14′10″N 0°55′30″E / 51.236°N 0.925°E / 51.236; 0.925 (Park Wood, Chilham)
TR 043 526
[199]
Map Citation This wood is mainly hazel and hornbeam coppice with oak standards, and diverse shrub and ground layers. There are many breeding birds and invertebrates, including two which are rare, the wasp Crossocerus distinguendus and the fly Stratiomys potamida.[200]
Parkgate Down Parkgate Down Green tickY 7.0 hectares
(17 acres)
[201]
YES Canterbury
51°10′16″N 1°00′36″E / 51.171°N 1.010°E / 51.171; 1.010 (Parkgate Down)
TR 168 459
[201]
KWT,[202] SAC[203] Map Citation This downland site has grassland which is grazed by sheep and cattle on the lower slopes and dense scrub on the upper ones. There are a variety of orchids including the uncommon lady and musk orchids.[204]
Parsonage Wood Parsonage Wood Green tickY 9.7 hectares
(24 acres)
[205]
YES Cranbrook
51°03′58″N 0°33′47″E / 51.066°N 0.563°E / 51.066; 0.563 (Parsonage Wood)
TQ 797 328
[205]
KWT[206] Map Citation This is an example of a woodland ghyll in the High Weald. The trees are mainly coppiced, but some of the ground flora are species which are indicative of ancient woods, such as butcher's broom, violet helleborine and pendulous sedge.[207]
Pembury Cutting and Pit Pembury Cutting and Pit Green tickY 1.6 hectares
(4.0 acres)
[208]
PP Tunbridge Wells
51°08′56″N 0°18′11″E / 51.149°N 0.303°E / 51.149; 0.303 (Pembury Cutting and Pit)
TQ 612 414
[208]
GCR[209] Map Citation This site exposes rocks of the Tunbridge Wells Sand Formation, dating to the Early Cretaceous around 140 to 100 millions years ago. There are many fossils of Lycopodites, an extinct plant.[210]
Peter's Pit Peters Pit Green tickY 28.7 hectares
(71 acres)
[211]
FP Rochester
51°20′13″N 0°27′50″E / 51.337°N 0.464°E / 51.337; 0.464 (Peter's Pit)
TQ 717 627
[211]
SAC[212][213] Map Citation This was formerly a chalk quarry and it has an undulating terrain. There are many ponds, some of which have populations of the great crested newt, a protected species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. The site has two reptiles, grass snakes and common European adders.[214]
Polebrook Farm Polebrook Farm Green tickY 13.0 hectares
(32 acres)
[215]
PP Edenbridge
51°12′29″N 0°09′18″E / 51.208°N 0.155°E / 51.208; 0.155 (Polebrook Farm)
TQ 506 476
[215]
Map Citation The field layout of this farm is believed to have remained unchanged for over 700 years. The hedges and meadows have a rich variety of flora, with at least 19 species of grasses.[216]
Preston Marshes Preston Marshes Green tickY 43.4 hectares
(107 acres)
[217]
NO Canterbury
51°17′49″N 1°12′07″E / 51.297°N 1.202°E / 51.297; 1.202 (Preston Marshes)
TR 233 602
[217]
Map Citation This site in the valley of the River Little Stour is dominated by common reed, with areas of willow scrub and pasture. There are many beeding and wintering birds, such as reed buntings and sedge warblers.[218]
Purple Hill Purple Hill Green tickY 14.9 hectares
(37 acres)
[219]
NO Maidstone
51°19′48″N 0°36′00″E / 51.330°N 0.600°E / 51.330; 0.600 (Purple Hill)
TQ 812 622
[219]
NCR[220] Map Citation This chalk downland site has herb-rich grassland, scrub and woods. Flora include the nationally rare Kentish milkwort and several uncommon orchids.[221]
Queendown Warren Queendown Warren Green tickY 22.2 hectares
(55 acres)
[222]
YES Sittingbourne
51°20′10″N 0°37′23″E / 51.336°N 0.623°E / 51.336; 0.623 (Queendown Warren)
TQ 828 629
[222]
AONB,[223] KWT,[223] LNR,[224] NCR,[220] Plant,[225] SAC[226][227] Map Citation This site has dry grassland and woodland on a south facing slope. It has two rare plants, early spider orchid and meadow clary, and a rich variety of insects.[228]
River Beult River Beult Green tickY 29.1 hectares
(72 acres)
[229]
PP Tonbridge
51°11′35″N 0°31′34″E / 51.193°N 0.526°E / 51.193; 0.526 (River Beult)
TQ 766 468
[229]
Map Citation The river has a varied clay river flora, with nearly 100 recorded species. There are floating plants such as yellow water-lily in the channel and flora on the banks include amphibious bistort and celery-leaved buttercup.[230]
Robins Wood Robins Wood Green tickY 47.7 hectares
(118 acres)
[231]
FP Cranbrook
51°04′34″N 0°31′19″E / 51.076°N 0.522°E / 51.076; 0.522 (Robins Wood)
TQ 768 338
[231]
Map Citation This is a deep valley along a stream in the Weald, and has the humid conditions typical of such areas. It has a diverse flora of mosses, ferns and liverworts, and woodland which is thought to date back to recolonisation after the last ice age ended 11,700 years ago.[232]
Rusthall Common Rusthall Common Green tickY 2.7 hectares
(6.7 acres)
[233]
YES Tunbridge Wells
51°07′59″N 0°14′24″E / 51.133°N 0.240°E / 51.133; 0.240 (Rusthall Common)
TQ 568 395
[233]
GCR[234] Map Citation This Quaternary site is important for its examples of sandstone weathering, especially Toad Rock, which stands on a narrow base moulded by periglacial wind erosion.[235]
Sandwich Bay to Hacklinge Marshes Sandwich Bay Green tickY Green tickY 1,790.1 hectares
(4,423 acres)
[236]
PP Sandwich
51°16′59″N 1°22′16″E / 51.283°N 1.371°E / 51.283; 1.371 (Sandwich Bay to Hacklinge Marshes)
TR 352 592
[236]
GCR,[237][238] KWT,[239] LNR,[240] NCR,[241] NNR,[36][242] Ramsar,[243] SAC,[244][245] SPA[246] Map Citation This site has over 30 plant species and 168 invertebrates which are nationally rare and nationally scarce, and several wintering birds are present in nationally important numbers. It is also a geologically important site, with diverse fish fossils dating to the Thanetian around 57 million years ago.[247]
Scord's Wood and Brockhoult Mount Brockhoult Mount Green tickY 252.3 hectares
(623 acres)
[248]
PP Westerham
51°14′53″N 0°06′43″E / 51.248°N 0.112°E / 51.248; 0.112 (Scord's Wood and Brockhoult Mount)
TQ 475 520
[248]
NCR[9] Map Citation This sloping site has the best sessile oak stands in the county. Grasslands on acidic soils are mainly common bent, heath bedstraw and sheep’s sorrel, together with some heather and bracken.[249]
Scotney Castle Scotney Castle Green tickY 112.5 hectares
(278 acres)
[250]
YES Tunbridge Wells
51°05′28″N 0°24′36″E / 51.091°N 0.410°E / 51.091; 0.410 (Scotney Castle)
TQ 689 352
[250]
NT[251] Map Citation This site has parkland, grassland, woodland. There are dormice, a protected species, and several nationally scarce invertebrates, such as Rolph's door snail. There are man-made ponds and a moat.[252]
Seabrook Stream Seabrook Stream Green tickY 24.1 hectares
(60 acres)
[253]
PP Folkestone
51°05′13″N 1°06′32″E / 51.087°N 1.109°E / 51.087; 1.109 (Seabrook Stream)
TR 178 366
[253]
Map Citation The main biological interest of this site lies in the sixty-seven species of cranefly which have been recorded in areas of alder carr and fen. Four are nationally scarce, including Erioptera limbata, which is only known on two other British sites, and there are also fourteen other nationally scarce invertebrate species.[254]
Sevenoaks Gravel Pits Sevenoaks Gravel Pits Green tickY 73.7 hectares
(182 acres)
[255]
PP Sevenoaks
51°17′28″N 0°10′52″E / 51.291°N 0.181°E / 51.291; 0.181 (Sevenoaks Gravel Pits)
TQ 522 569
[255]
KWT[256] Map Citation This site has flooded gravel pits which have a variety of breeding and wintering birds. There are thirteen species of dragonfly, and there are also areas of reedbeds and woodland.[257]
Sheppey Cliffs and Foreshore Sheppey Cliffs and Foreshore Green tickY Green tickY 303.6 hectares
(750 acres)
[258]
PP Sheerness
51°25′16″N 0°51′54″E / 51.421°N 0.865°E / 51.421; 0.865 (Sheppey Cliffs and Foreshore)
TQ 993 730
[258]
GCR[259][260][261][262][263] Map Citation This site exposes Eocene London Clay with well preserved fossil fauna and flora, which have been studied since the eighteenth century. Flora include tropical lianas. The site is botanically important for the nationally rare dragon's teeth.[264]
Shorne and Ashenbank Woods Ashenbank Wood Green tickY 197.4 hectares
(488 acres)
[265]
YES Gravesend
51°24′11″N 0°24′50″E / 51.403°N 0.414°E / 51.403; 0.414 (Shorne and Ashenbank Woods)
TQ 680 699
[265]
Map Citation These woods have diverse and important invertebrates, especially dragonflies, beetles and true bugs, including the rare beetles Mordella holomelaena and Peltodytes caesus. Several clay workings have been landscaped to create shallow ponds designed for wildlife.[266]
Sissinghurst Park Wood Sissinghurst Park Wood Green tickY 34.1 hectares
(84 acres)
[267]
NO Cranbrook
51°07′12″N 0°34′23″E / 51.120°N 0.573°E / 51.120; 0.573 (Sissinghurst Park Wood)
TQ 802 388
[267]
Map Citation This wood is mainly sweet chestnut coppice, and the importance of the site lies in the number of rare plants found in its rides. It is the most eastern locality in Britain for ivy-leaved bellflower.[268]
South Thames Estuary and Marshes South Thames Estuary and Marshes Green tickY 5,289.0 hectares
(13,069 acres)
[269]
PP Rochester
51°28′16″N 0°34′34″E / 51.471°N 0.576°E / 51.471; 0.576 (South Thames Estuary and Marshes)
TQ 790 778
[269]
NCR,[178] Ramsar,[270] RSPB,[271] SPA[272] Map Citation Over 20,000 waterfowl use this site, and some species are present in internationally important numbers. There are nationally scarce plants on dykes, and the diverse invertebra include nationally rare beetles, flies and true bugs.[273]
Southborough Pit Southborough Pit Green tickY 1.1 hectares
(2.7 acres)
[274]
PP Tunbridge Wells
51°09′11″N 0°16′34″E / 51.153°N 0.276°E / 51.153; 0.276 (Southborough Pit)
TQ 593 418
[274]
GCR[275] Map Citation This site dates to the Valanginian age, around 140 million years ago in the Lower Cretaceous. It is the type locality for the High Brooms Soil Bed, which contains the aquatic horsetail Equisetes lyellii.[276]
Spot Lane Quarry Spot Lane Quarry Green tickY 0.1 hectares
(0.25 acres)
[277]
YES Maidstone
51°15′29″N 0°34′05″E / 51.258°N 0.568°E / 51.258; 0.568 (Spot Lane Quarry)
TQ 793 541
[277]
GCR[278][279] Map Citation This site exposes loess, probably dating to the glacial Wolstonian Stage between 352,000 and 130,000 years ago. It contains the fossils of land snails, and as loess in Britain is usually unfossiliferous, it is one of the few sites where loess fauna can be studied.[280]
Stodmarsh Stodmarsh Green tickY 623.2 hectares
(1,540 acres)
[281]
PP Canterbury
51°18′29″N 1°10′19″E / 51.308°N 1.172°E / 51.308; 1.172 (Stodmarsh)
TR 212 613
[281]
NCR,[282] NNR,[36][283] Ramsar,[284] SAC,[285] SPA[286] Map Citation This site has flooded gravel pits, scrub, reed beds, grassland and alder carr, with a diverse flora and fauna. Several scarce moths have been recorded and two rare birds, cetti's warbler and the bearded tit, breed in nationally significant numbers.[287]
Sturry Pit Sturry Pit Green tickY 0.7 hectares
(1.7 acres)
[288]
YES Canterbury
51°18′14″N 1°07′12″E / 51.304°N 1.120°E / 51.304; 1.120 (Sturry Pit)
TR 176 607
[288]
GCR[289] Map Citation This former gravel quarry has yielded many hand axes of Middle Acheulian style from the third terrace of the River Stour. It is important for understanding the chronologies of the terraces of the Thames basin in the Pleistocene.[290]
The Swale The Swale Green tickY 6,509.4 hectares
(16,085 acres)
[291]
PP Faversham
51°21′43″N 0°52′23″E / 51.362°N 0.873°E / 51.362; 0.873 (The Swale)
TR 001 665
[291]
KWT,[292] LNR,[293] NCR,[173] NNR,[294][295][36] Ramsar,[296] SPA[297] Map Citation This site has mudflats, saltmarsh and fresh water marsh. It has many wildfowl and waders, including internationally important numbers of teal, wigeon and grey plover. The Swale also has a rich variety of invertebrates and plants.[298]
Swanscombe Skull Site Swanscombe Skull Site Green tickY 3.9 hectares
(9.6 acres)
[299]
YES Swanscombe
51°26′38″N 0°17′49″E / 51.444°N 0.297°E / 51.444; 0.297 (Swanscombe Skull Site)
TQ 597 742
[299]
GCR,[300][301] NNR[36][302] Map Citation The large stone in the photograph marks the place where in 1935 dentist Alvan Marston found the first Lower Paleolithic human fossil in Britain. It is part of the skull of a 400,000 year old early Neanderthal woman, and is one of only two British sites to have yielded human remains from this early period.[303][304]
Tankerton Slopes Tankerton Slopes Green tickY 2.3 hectares
(5.7 acres)
[305]
YES Whitstable
51°21′50″N 1°02′42″E / 51.364°N 1.045°E / 51.364; 1.045 (Tankerton Slopes)
TR 121 672
[305]
SAC[306] Map Citation This north facing slope has a population of tall herbs, including the largest population in Britain of hog’s fennel, a nationally rare umbellifer. Fauna include Agonopterix putridella, a nationally rare moth whose larvae feed exclusively on hog's fennel.[307]
Thanet Coast Thanet Coast Green tickY Green tickY 816.9 hectares
(2,019 acres)
[308]
PP Birchington
51°22′48″N 1°16′44″E / 51.380°N 1.279°E / 51.380; 1.279 (Thanet Coast)
TR 283 696
[308]
GCR,[309] LNR,[310] Ramsar,[243] SAC,[245][306] SPA[246] Map Citation This site has unstable cliffs and foreshore, saltmarsh, lagoons, woodland and grassland. It has internationally important numbers of wintering birds and three nationally rare invertebrates. It is also an important Palaeocene site and paleobotanical locality.[311]
Tower Hill to Cockham Wood Tower Hill to Cockham Wood Green tickY Green tickY 48.8 hectares
(121 acres)
[312]
PP Rochester
51°24′36″N 0°31′52″E / 51.410°N 0.531°E / 51.410; 0.531 (Tower Hill to Cockham Wood)
TQ 761 709
[312]
GCR[313][314] Map Citation This site contains typical woodland on Tertiary deposits, and sandy areas which have diverse invertebrates, including seven nationally rare bees and wasps. Upnor Quarry exposes a complete sequence of Tertiary rocks.[315]
Trottiscliffe Meadows Trottiscliffe Meadows Green tickY 4.8 hectares
(12 acres)
[316]
FP West Malling
51°18′40″N 0°21′22″E / 51.311°N 0.356°E / 51.311; 0.356 (Trottiscliffe Meadows)
TQ 643 595
[316]
NCR[317] Map Citation These meadows on gault clay are crossed by calcareous streams, and they are two of the few remaining areas of unimproved grassland in the county. They have a number of uncommon plants, such as marsh valerian, carnation sedge, brown sedge and the rare moss Cratoneuron filicinum.[318]
Wansunt Pit Wansunt Pit Green tickY 1.9 hectares
(4.7 acres)
[319]
PP Dartford
51°26′35″N 0°10′44″E / 51.443°N 0.179°E / 51.443; 0.179 (Wansunt Pit)
TQ 515 738
[319]
GCR[320] Map[e] Citation The site exposes the Dartford Heath Gravel. The relationship of this exposure to the Swanscombe sequence and the Thames Terraces is a controversial issue in Thames Pleistocene studies.[321] Stone tools have been found of Homo heidelbergensis, dating from the Hoxnian Stage, an interglacial period between 424,000 and 374,000 years ago.[322]
Wateringbury Wateringbury Green tickY 0.2 hectares
(0.49 acres)
[323]
NO Maidstone
51°15′18″N 0°24′58″E / 51.255°N 0.416°E / 51.255; 0.416 (Wateringbury)
TQ 687 534
[323]
GCR[324] Map Citation This site contains tufa which displays a complete sequence of molluscs, especially terrestrial snails, dating to the early Holocene, and thus gives a full record of the order in which species colonised the area after the end of the last ice age, the Younger Dryas.[325]
West Blean and Thornden Woods Thornden Woods Green tickY 781.0 hectares
(1,930 acres)
[326]
PP Herne Bay
51°19′41″N 1°05′17″E / 51.328°N 1.088°E / 51.328; 1.088 (West Blean and Thornden Woods)
TR 152 633
[326]
KWT,[327] NCR[34] Map Citation These woods have more than fifty species of breeding birds, and the diverse invertebrate fauna include five nationally rare and thirteen nationally scarce species. There is also a population of the declining and protected hazel dormouse.[328]
Westerham Mines Westerham Mines Green tickY 25.4 hectares
(63 acres)
[329]
PP Westerham
51°15′25″N 0°05′02″E / 51.257°N 0.084°E / 51.257; 0.084 (Westerham Mines)
TQ 455 529
[329]
Map Citation The main interest of this site lies in the use of former mines by five species of bats for hibernation. They are the whiskered, Brandt's, Daubenton's, Natterer's and long-eared bats. Some moths also hibernate in the mines.[330]
Westerham Wood Westerham Wood Green tickY 43.3 hectares
(107 acres)
[331]
NO Westerham
51°16′34″N 0°03′43″E / 51.276°N 0.062°E / 51.276; 0.062 (Westerham Wood)
TQ 439 550
[331]
Map Citation This ancient oak wood on Gault Clay is traditionally managed, and it has a diverse ground flora and an outstanding range of breeding birds. The insect fauna is also diverse, and 77 bryophyte and nearly 300 fungus species have been recorded.[332]
Wouldham to Detling Escarpment Wouldham to Detling Escarpment Green tickY Green tickY 311.2 hectares
(769 acres)
[333]
PP Chatham
51°19′19″N 0°30′50″E / 51.322°N 0.514°E / 51.322; 0.514 (Wouldham to Detling Escarpment)
TQ 753 611
[333]
AONB,[334] GCR,[335] KWT,[336][337][338] LNR,[339] NCR,[340] SAC[111] Map Citation This stretch of chalk escarpment has woodland, unimproved grassland and scrub. Plants include the nationally rare meadow clary and there are several scarce invertebrates. There are many Mesozoic fossil fishes in an excellent state of preservation.[341]
Wye and Crundale Downs Wye and Crundale Downs Green tickY Green tickY 358.3 hectares
(885 acres)
[342]
PP Ashford
51°10′34″N 0°58′08″E / 51.176°N 0.969°E / 51.176; 0.969 (Wye and Crundale Downs)
TR 076 460
[342]
AONB,[342] GCR,[343][344] NCR,[345] NNR,[36][346] SAC[347][348] Map Citation This site has a variety of habitats, including grassland, calacreous fen meadow, scrub, dry woodland on chalk and wet alder woodland. The Devil’s Kneading Trough, found within the site, is an important geological site displaying periglacial changes dating to the late glacial period.[349]
Yockletts Bank Yockletts Bank Green tickY 25.4 hectares
(63 acres)
[350]
YES Canterbury
51°11′17″N 1°02′24″E / 51.188°N 1.040°E / 51.188; 1.040 (Yockletts Bank)
TR 125 476
[350]
AONB,[351] KWT[351] Map Citation This sloping site has woodland on dry chalk soils with diverse woodland breeding birds. The ground flora, dominated by bluebells, also contains many orchids.[352]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b The area and grid reference are taken from the "Details" page for each site on the Natural England database.[5]
  2. ^ The maps are provided by Natural England on the Magic Map website.
  3. ^ Citations are provided for each site by Natural England.
  4. ^ a b Dungeness, Romney Marsh and Rye Bay and High Rocks are partly in East Sussex
  5. ^ Wansunt Pit is partly in Greater London

References

  1. ^ a b "Kent". Encyclopedia Britannica. Archived from the original on 22 April 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  2. ^ "District councils". Kent County Council. Archived from the original on 27 October 2017. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  3. ^ "Council and democracy". Kent County Council. Archived from the original on 6 February 2007. Retrieved 19 April 2007.
  4. ^ "Sites of Special Scientific Interest: Designation". Natural England. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 19 April 2016.
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