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List of Ozzy Osbourne members

Current and former members of Ozzy Osbourne's solo band performing live in 2008 (top) and 2018 (bottom).

Ozzy Osbourne is an English heavy metal vocalist from Aston, Birmingham. After he was fired from Black Sabbath earlier in the year, Osbourne formed a solo band (initially known as Blizzard of Ozz) in November 1979 with guitarist Randy Rhoads, bassist Bob Daisley and drummer Lee Kerslake. Since their inception, the group's personnel have changed regularly. The current lineup includes guitarist Zakk Wylde (who first joined in 1987 until 1992, spent a second tenure in the band from 2001 and 2009, and most recently rejoined in 2017), bassist Rob "Blasko" Nicholson (a member since 2003), keyboardist and rhythm guitarist Adam Wakeman (who first joined as a touring musician in 2004, and was made an official member with the release of Scream in 2010), and drummer Tommy Clufetos (since 2010).

History

1979–1982

Ozzy Osbourne was fired from Black Sabbath on 27 April 1979, primarily due to his problems with alcohol and drug abuse.[1] The vocalist subsequently rehearsed with a range of musicians in an attempt to form his own band, including guitarists Gary Moore of Thin Lizzy and George Lynch of Dokken,[2][3] bassist Dana Strum,[4] and drummers Dixie Lee of Lone Star and Dave Potts of Praying Mantis.[5][6] By November 1979, he had settled on a supergroup lineup including former Quiet Riot guitarist Randy Rhoads, former Rainbow bassist and backing vocalist Bob Daisley, and former Uriah Heep drummer Lee Kerslake.[6]

The new band released their debut album Blizzard of Ozz in September 1980, which also featured keyboard contributions from Don Airey.[2] For the album's promotional tour, this role was handled by Lindsay Bridgwater.[7] After the recording of Diary of a Madman, on which Johnny Cook performed uncredited keyboards,[8] both Daisley and Kerslake were fired; Osbourne has blamed the pair's dismissal on creative differences, while his wife Sharon has cited financial disputes.[2] They were replaced by Rudy Sarzo (a former member of Quiet Riot with Rhoads) and Tommy Aldridge, respectively, who were both credited on the Diary of a Madman album sleeve, despite having not performed on it.[9] After the end of the Blizzard of Ozz touring cycle, Diary of a Madman was released in November 1981.[9]

The Diary of a Madman Tour commenced in December, with Don Airey in place of Bridgwater on keyboards.[10] On 19 March 1982, however, the tour came to an abrupt halt when Rhoads was killed in a plane crash in Leesburg, Florida. The incident occurred when tour bus driver Andrew Aycock took the aircraft out for a joyride and repeatedly flew close to the bus, eventually clipping it and crashing into a building.[11] After a two-week break, Sarzo's brother Robert was chosen as the replacement for Rhoads, although Osbourne's label Jet Records had already promised the position to Bernie Tormé, who joined thereafter.[12]

Tormé debuted with the band on 1 April 1982 in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. However, after just seven shows he had left again, in part to focus on his solo career but also due to the "horrible ... bad atmosphere" that was present in the wake of Rhoads's death.[13] On 13 April, Night Ranger guitarist Brad Gillis took over from Tormé, remaining for the rest of the tour.[13] Osbourne was contractually obliged by CBS Records to produce a live album before the end of the year, which came in the form of Speak of the Devil, a collection of Black Sabbath covers.[14] After the tour's conclusion in September, Sarzo left Osbourne's band.[15]

1982–1992

For the first leg of the Speak of the Devil Tour in December 1982, Osbourne and his band performed with UFO bassist Pete Way.[16] After Gillis left to return to Night Ranger, the position of guitarist was filled at the end of the year by Jake E. Lee, formerly of Ratt and Rough Cutt.[17] George Lynch, who had previously auditioned for the band in 1979, was initially given the role by Osbourne, but was then immediately fired when Lee was brought in.[18] Don Costa took over from Way for the remainder of the tour,[19] before Bob Daisley returned in time to perform at the US Festival in May.[20] After the recording of Bark at the Moon, Tommy Aldridge was replaced by Carmine Appice, although by early 1984 he had returned due to personal differences and tensions between Osbourne and the new drummer.[21] By the time the Bark at the Moon Tour had finished in January 1985, Aldridge had decided to leave the band again, having not fully enjoyed the role since Rhoads's death.[22]

Zakk Wylde took over from Jake E. Lee in 1987, performing on No Rest for the Wicked and No More Tears. He would later rejoin in 2001 and again in 2017.

Lee and Daisley commenced work on the next Ozzy Osbourne album The Ultimate Sin without the eponymous vocalist, who had been admitted to a drug and alcohol rehabilitation centre.[23] Drums were handled initially by Fred Coury and later Jimmy DeGrasso, however the sessions were later scrapped and both Daisley and DeGrasso left the group.[24] By the time recording restarted in the summer, the group consisted of Osbourne, Lee, bassist Phil Soussan and former Lita Ford drummer Randy Castillo.[25] Keyboards on the album were performed by Mike Moran.[26] For the subsequent promotional tour, John Sinclair took over as the band's backup keyboardist.[27]

Osbourne and Lee parted ways after the conclusion of The Ultimate Sin Tour, reportedly on "amiable" terms.[28] After various guitarists sent in demo tapes and auditioned for the vacated role, Zakk Wylde (then using the moniker "Zack Wylant") was chosen as Lee's replacement, debuting at a private show at Wormwood Scrubs Prison in July.[29] Soussan left shortly thereafter due to disagreements over songwriting credits, with Bob Daisley returning to record bass on No Rest for the Wicked.[30] In May 1988, it was announced that former Black Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler would join the lineup of Osbourne's band for the No Rest for the Wicked Tour later that year.[31]

After the tour, the group began working on new material with bassist Terry Nails,[32] although before the end of 1989 he was replaced by Mike Inez.[33] The new bassist, however, was later replaced for the recording by Bob Daisley, who claimed that Inez's parts were not "sounding and feeling how Ozzy wanted" them to.[34] Inez remained the group's official bassist and was credited with "bass and music inspiration" on the sleeve of the resulting album, No More Tears.[35] For the subsequent Theatre of Madness Tour, Kevin Jones took over from Sinclair, who was then touring with the Cult.[27] Osbourne later announced that he intended to retire from music, embarking on the No More Tours Tour in 1992. The final shows took place in November and featured reunions with former Black Sabbath bandmates Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler and Bill Ward.[36]

1994–2003

Despite describing his retirement as "absolutely for real", Osbourne returned to his music career just two years later, claiming that "Retirement sucked. It wasn't too long before I started getting antsy and writing songs again."[37] In the meantime, Inez had joined Alice in Chains and Wylde had formed Pride and Glory, meaning the singer had to recruit a new band – in 1994, he began rehearsing with Bob Daisley, former David Lee Roth and Whitesnake guitarist Steve Vai, and former Hardline drummer Deen Castronovo.[38] This lineup fell apart early the next year, with Zakk Wylde and Geezer Butler brought in to replace Vai and Daisley on the Ozzmosis album.[38]

Bassist Robert Trujillo was a mainstay of the Ozzy Osbourne band lineup during the late 1990s and early 2000s, remaining until he joined Metallica in 2003.

Osbourne's first show after returning took place in Nottingham, England in June 1995 and featured former Testament guitarist Alex Skolnick as part of the lineup.[39] However, a few weeks later, he was informed that he would not be joining the band.[40] The role was instead given to Joe Holmes, another former David Lee Roth band member,[41] who began rehearsing with the group in July.[42] The Retirement Sucks Tour commenced in August with a string of South American shows as part of Monsters of Rock, after which Castronovo was fired due to differences with Osbourne, and replaced by the returning Randy Castillo.[42] Another change in personnel came in January 1996, when Butler left the tour due to homesickness, with Osbourne enlisting former bassist Mike Inez to take his place for the rest of the shows.[43]

By March 1996, Inez and Castillo had been replaced by Robert Trujillo (formerly of Suicidal Tendencies and Infectious Grooves) and Mike Bordin (of Faith No More).[44] During the build-up to the following year's Ozzfest tour, it was reported that Holmes had left Osbourne's band after becoming a "born again Catholic".[45] However, just over a month later the reports were updated to state that the guitarist had returned.[46] In early 1998, Osbourne temporarily reunited with former members Zakk Wylde, Mike Inez and Randy Castillo for The Ozzman Cometh Tour in Australia, New Zealand and Japan.[47] Holmes, Trujillo and Bordin remained the official members of the band, however, and began work on their first album together in 1999.[48] Bordin spent much of 2000 filling in for the injured David Silveria in Korn.[49]

While Bordin was unavailable, drums were handled by Roy Mayorga and later Brian Tichy.[50][51] Holmes remained after the end of the 2000 Ozzfest tour to work on Osbourne's next album, co-writing three songs,[52] but by early 2001 had been replaced by the returning Zakk Wylde.[53] Down to Earth was released later that year, with keyboards performed by Michael Railo and producer Tim Palmer.[54] The band's lineup remained stable for the Merry Mayhem and Down to Earth Tours, before Trujillo left to join Metallica in February 2003, following several auditions.[55] After his last show on 14 March, he was replaced in Osbourne's band by his predecessor in Metallica, Jason Newsted.[56] The new bassist toured with the group throughout the year, but by December had been replaced by Rob "Blasko" Nicholson.[57]

2003 onwards

Days after the announcement of Nicholson's addition to his band, Osbourne was injured in a quad bike crash and forced to cancel many of his 2004 tour dates.[58] He returned for the Ozzfest tour in the summer.[59] The shows also featured the debut of new keyboardist and rhythm guitarist Adam Wakeman, who had initially been asked to join the previous year before Osbourne's accident.[60] Around the same time, the vocalist recorded Under Cover, an album of cover versions, with Alice in Chains guitarist Jerry Cantrell, former Cult bassist Chris Wyse and regular drummer Mike Bordin.[61] The regular lineup remained for Black Rain, which was released in 2007.[62] In July 2009, Osbourne parted ways with long-term guitarist Zakk Wylde, joking that his music was "beginning to sound like [Wylde's other band] Black Label Society".[63] Wylde was replaced by Firewind guitarist Gus G, who was hired immediately after auditioning.[64]

During Gus G's audition and first shows, Rob Zombie drummer Tommy Clufetos was asked to fill in for Bordin, who had recently reformed Faith No More.[65] This led to him becoming a full-time member of the band, debuting on the following year's studio album Scream, which also marked the debut of Wakeman as an official member of the group.[66] The band remained inactive for much of the next few years, as Osbourne and Clufetos performed as part of the reunited Black Sabbath on their final concert tour, which ended on 4 February 2017.[67] Less than three months after the end of the tour, Osbourne announced that he would be reuniting with Zakk Wylde for an upcoming tour celebrating the 30th anniversary of their working relationship.[68] This was later expanded into No More Tours II, dubbed the last worldwide tour by the vocalist, which is set to run through 2020.[69]

Official members

Current members

Image Name Years active Instruments Release contributions
OzzyChangingHands02-20-2010.jpg
Ozzy Osbourne 1979–present lead vocals all Ozzy Osbourne releases
Wylde.cropped.png
Zakk Wylde
  • 1987–1992
  • 1995 (session)
  • 1998 (touring)
  • 2001–2009
  • 2017–present
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
  • keyboards (studio only)
Ozzy en Chile 2011 (4).jpg
Rob "Blasko" Nicholson 2003–present bass
  • Black Rain (2007)
  • Scream (2010)
  • iTunes Festival: London 2010 (2010)
Adam Wakeman pic 1.jpg
Adam Wakeman 2004–present (credited as a backup musician 2004–10)
  • keyboards
  • rhythm guitar
  • Under Cover (2005)
  • Scream (2010)
  • iTunes Festival: London 2010 (2010)
W2590 Hellfest2016 BlackSabbath TommyClufetos 8575.jpg
Tommy Clufetos 2010–present (initially a touring substitute in 2009) drums
  • Scream (2010)
  • iTunes Festival: London 2010 (2010)

Former members

Image Name Years active Instruments Release contributions
Randy Rhoads (1980).jpg
Randy Rhoads 1979–1982 (until his death) guitar
Bob Daisley
  • 1979–1981
  • 1983–1985
  • 1987–1988 (session only)
  • 1990–1991 (session only)
  • 1994–1995
  • bass
  • backing vocals
  • percussion (studio only)
Lee-Kerslake.jpg
Lee Kerslake 1979–1981
  • drums
  • percussion
  • Blizzard of Ozz (1980)
  • Mr Crowley Live EP (1980)
  • Diary of a Madman (1981)
  • Tribute (1987) – two tracks only
W0959-Hellfest2013 Whitesnake TommyAldridge 68105-Crop.JPG
Tommy Aldridge
  • 1981–1983
  • 1984–1985
drums
RudySarzo.jpg
Rudy Sarzo 1981–1982 bass
  • Speak of the Devil (1982)
  • Tribute (1987)
  • Ozzy Live (2012)
Bernie Tormé 1982 (died 2019) guitar none – live performances only
Brad Gillis Live.png
Brad Gillis 1982 Speak of the Devil (1982)
2007-10-23 UFO, Kantine, Koeln, Pete Way, IMG 7203.jpg
Pete Way bass none – live performances only
Jake E. Lee in 2014.jpg
Jake E. Lee 1982–1987
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
Don Costa 1983 bass none – live performances only
Carmine Appice in 2015.jpg
Carmine Appice 1983–1984 drums
Fred Coury - Cinderella (cropped).jpg
Fred Coury 1985 none – studio rehearsals only
Black_Star_Riders_%E2%80%93_Wacken_Open_Air_2014_17.jpg
Jimmy DeGrasso
Randy Castillo
  • 1985–1992
  • 1995–1996
  • 1998 (touring) (died 2002)
all Ozzy Osbourne releases from The Ultimate Sin (1986) to Live & Loud (1993), except Tribute (1987)
Phil Soussan Iraq 2.jpg
Phil Soussan 1985–1987 bass
  • The Ultimate Sin (1986)
  • Ultimate Live Ozzy (1986)
Heaven And Hell 4.jpg
Geezer Butler
  • 1988–1989
  • 1995–1996
Terry Nails 1989 Prince of Darkness (2005) – three previously unreleased demo recordings
MikeInez crop lrg.jpg
Mike Inez
  • 1989–1992
  • 1996 (touring)
  • 1998 (touring)
Live & Loud (1993)
Band photo 2017.jpg
Deen Castronovo 1994–1995 drums Ozzmosis (1995)
Steve Vai 2011.jpg
Steve Vai guitar none – credited for songwriting on Ozzmosis (1995) for "My Little Man"
Tuska 20130629 - Testament - 19.jpg
Alex Skolnick 1995 none – one live performance only
Joe26.jpg
Joe Holmes 1995–2001 "Walk on Water" (1996)
TrujilloFantsticFest2103.jpg
Robert Trujillo 1996–2003 bass
  • Down to Earth (2001)
  • Blizzard of Ozz and Diary of a Madman reissues (2002)
  • Live at Budokan (2002)
Faith No More - Flickr - p a h (7).jpg
Mike Bordin 1996–2010 (inactive 2000)
  • drums
  • percussion
all Ozzy Osbourne releases from Down to Earth (2001) to Black Rain (2007)
13-06-09 RaR Newsted 14.jpg
Jason Newsted 2003 bass none – live performances only
Gus G (Ozzy Osbourne).jpg
Gus G 2009–2017
  • guitar
  • backing vocals
  • Scream (2010)
  • iTunes Festival: London 2010 (2010)

Other contributors

Backup musicians

Image Name Years active Instruments Details
Deep Purple - inFinite - The Long Goodbye Tour - Barclaycard Arena Hamburg 2017 05.jpg
Don Airey
  • 1979–1980 (session only)
  • 1981–1982 (touring only)
  • 1983–1985 (session/touring)
keyboards Airey performed keyboards on Blizzard of Ozz,[2] later replaced Bridgwater on the Diary of a Madman Tour,[70] then returned for Bark at the Moon and the album's promotional tour through 1985.[71][72]
Lindsay Bridgwater
  • 1980–1981 (touring only)
  • 1982–1983 (touring only)
  • keyboards
  • rhythm guitar
Bridgwater performed on the Blizzard of Ozz, Diary of a Madman and Speak of the Devil Tours.[10]
Johnny Cook 1981 (session only) keyboards Cook performed on 1981's Diary of a Madman, although Airey was credited on the album's sleeve.[8]
Mike Moran 1985 (session only) Moran performed keyboards on Osbourne's 1986 album The Ultimate Sin.[26]
John Sinclair
  • 1986–1991 (session/touring)
  • 1995–2003 (touring only)
Sinclair joined in time for The Ultimate Sin Tour, remaining with Osbourne's band for 17 years.[27]
Kevin Jones 1991–1992 (touring only) Jones temporarily replaced Sinclair, who was touring with the Cult, for the Theatre of Madness Tour.[27]
RickWakemanMiniMoog.jpg
Rick Wakeman 1995 (session only) Wakeman performed keyboards on the 1995 album Ozzmosis, alongside producer Michael Beinhorn.[73]
Michael Railo 2001 (session only)
  • keyboards
  • backing vocals
Railo performed keyboards on the 2001 album Down to Earth, alongside producer Tim Palmer.[54]
Andrew Watt2.jpg
Andrew Watt 2019 (session only) guitar Watt, Slash, McKagan and Smith performed on Osbourne's 2019 album Ordinary Man.[74]
Duff McKagan 2012 (cropped).JPG
Duff Mckagan bass
Red Hot Chili Peppers - Rock am Ring 2016 -2016156230621 2016-06-04 Rock am Ring - Sven - 1D X - 0127 - DV3P9786 mod.jpg
Chad Smith drums
CC BY 2.0


Slash


guitar

Guest contributors

Image Name Years active Instruments Details
Roy Mayorga.jpg
Roy Mayorga 2000 (touring substitutes) drums Mayorga and Tichy substituted for Mike Bordin while he was touring with Korn during 2000.[50][51]
Brian-Tichy.jpg
Brian Tichy
Danny Saber 2001 (session musician)
  • guitar
  • tubular bells
Saber contributed additional guitar to "Alive" and tubular bells to the 2002 reissue of Blizzard of Ozz.[54][75]
Jerry Cantrell 10.jpg
Jerry Cantrell 2004 (session musicians) guitar Cantrell, Wyse and regular drummer Mike Bordin performed on the 2005 album Under Cover.[61]
ChrisWyse2013.jpg
Chris Wyse bass

Timeline

Recording Timeline

Role Album
Blizzard of Ozz
(1980)
Diary of a Madman
(1981)
Bark at the Moon
(1983)
The Ultimate Sin
(1986)
No Rest for the Wicked
(1988)
No More Tears
(1991)
Ozzmosis
(1995)
Down to Earth
(2001)
Under Cover
(2005)
Black Rain
(2007)
Scream
(2010)
Ordinary Man
(2020)
Lead Vocals Ozzy Osbourne
Guitar Randy Rhoads Jake E. Lee Zakk Wylde Jerry Cantrell Zakk Wylde Gus G Andrew Watt
Bass Bob Daisley Phil Soussan Bob Daisley Geezer Butler Robert Trujillo Chris Wyse Rob Nicholson Duff McKagan
Keyboards Don Airey Johnny Cook Don Airey Mike Moran John Sinclair Rick Wakeman Michael Railo Steve Dudas Adam Wakeman Andrew Watt/Happy Perez
Drums Lee Kerslake Tommy Aldridge Randy Castillo Deen Castronovo Mike Bordin Tommy Clufetos Chad Smith

Lineups

Period Members Releases
November 1979 – February 1981
February – March 1981
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Lee Kerslake – drums, percussion
  • Johnny Cook – keyboards (session)
March – December 1981
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Rudy Sarzo – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Lindsey Bridgwater – keyboards (touring)
  • Tribute (1987) – remaining tracks
  • Ozzy Live (2012)
December 1981 – March 1982
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Randy Rhoads – guitar
  • Rudy Sarzo – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
none Diary of a Madman Tour only
March – April 1982
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Bernie Tormé – guitar
  • Rudy Sarzo – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
April – September 1982
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Brad Gillis – guitar
  • Rudy Sarzo – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
December 1982
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Brad Gillis – guitar
  • Pete Way – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Lindsey Bridgwater – keyboards (touring)
none Speak of the Devil Tour only
December 1982 – February 1983
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Don Costa – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Lindsey Bridgwater – keyboards (touring)
February – May 1983
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Don Costa – bass
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
May – September 1983
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (session)
September 1983 – March 1984
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Carmine Appice – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
none Bark at the Moon Tour only
March 1984 – January 1985
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Tommy Aldridge – drums
  • Don Airey – keyboards (touring)
February – March 1985
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Fred Coury – drums
none – studio rehearsals only
March – April 1985
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Bob Daisley – bass, backing vocals
  • Jimmy DeGrasso – drums
  • Mike Moran – keyboards (session)
August – late 1985
Early 1986 – April 1987
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Jake E. Lee – guitar, backing vocals
  • Phil Soussan – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
  • Ultimate Live Ozzy (1986)
May – late 1987
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Phil Soussan – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
none – studio rehearsals only
Late 1987 – early 1988
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • Bob Daisley – bass (session)
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
May 1988 – August 1989
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Geezer Butler – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
Late 1989
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Terry Nails – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
none – studio rehearsals only
(demos later released on Prince of Darkness)
Late 1989 – October 1991
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Inez – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
October 1991 – May 1992
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Inez – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • Kevin Jones – keyboards (touring)
May – November 1992
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Mike Inez – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (session/touring)
none No More Tours Tour only
Band inactive November 1992 – late 1994
Late 1994 – February 1995 none – studio rehearsals only
February – May 1995
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Geezer Butler – bass
  • Deen Castronovo – drums
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar (session)
  • Rick Wakeman – keyboards (session)
May – July 1995
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Alex Skolnick – guitar
  • Geezer Butler – bass
  • Deen Castronovo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
none Retirement Sucks Tour only
July – September 1995
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Geezer Butler – bass
  • Deen Castronovo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
September 1995 – January 1996
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Geezer Butler – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
January – March 1996
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • Mike Inez – bass (touring)
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
March 1996 – October 2000
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Robert Trujillo – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
January – March 1998
(one-off touring lineup)
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar
  • Mike Inez – bass
  • Randy Castillo – drums
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
none The Ozzman Cometh Tour only
April – May 2000
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Robert Trujillo – bass
  • Roy Mayorga – drums (touring)
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
none Ozzfest tour dates only
May – September 2000
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Robert Trujillo – bass
  • Brian Tichy – drums (touring)
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
September 2000 – January 2001
  • Ozzy Osbourne – vocals
  • Joe Holmes – guitar
  • Robert Trujillo – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
none – studio rehearsals only
January 2001 – March 2003
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Robert Trujillo – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
  • Michael Railo – keyboards (session)
  • John Sinclair – keyboards (touring)
March – December 2003
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Jason Newsted – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
  • Michael St. Claire – keyboards (touring)
none – Ozzfest and other tour dates only
December 2003 – July 2004
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, backing vocals
  • Rob "Blasko" Nicholson – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
none – studio rehearsals only
July 2004 – July 2009
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – guitar, keyboards, backing vocals
  • Rob "Blasko" Nicholson – bass
  • Mike Bordin – drums, percussion
  • Adam Wakeman – keyboards, guitar (touring)
Summer – late 2004
(special recording lineup)
July 2009 – April 2017
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Gus G – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Rob "Blasko" Nicholson – bass
  • Tommy Clufetos – drums (initially touring)
  • Adam Wakeman – keyboards, rhythm guitar
  • Scream (2010)
  • iTunes Festival: London 2010 (2010)
April 2017 – present
  • Ozzy Osbourne – lead vocals
  • Zakk Wylde – lead guitar, backing vocals
  • Rob "Blasko" Nicholson – bass
  • Tommy Clufetos – drums
  • Adam Wakeman – keyboards, rhythm guitar
none as yet No More Tours II only
September – November 2019
(special recording lineup)

References

  1. ^ Wiederhorn, Jon (27 April 2017). "39 Years Ago: Black Sabbath Fire Ozzy Osbourne". Loudwire. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Elliott, Paul (20 July 2011). "Blizzard Of Ozz: the insane story of the album that saved Ozzy Osbourne". Classic Rock. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  3. ^ "George Lynch On Taking Over Randy Rhoads' Students After Losing Ozzy Guitar Gig - "Yeah, I Got The Consolation Prize"; Audio Interview Streaming". Brave Words & Bloody Knuckles. 10 March 2015. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  4. ^ Fitzpatrick, Rob (16 June 2011). "Ozzy Osbourne: 'I had nothing to lose'". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  5. ^ Barton, Geoff (13 May 2016). "The strange story of Lone Star, the band that punk killed (or did it?)". Classic Rock. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
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External links