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Lawrence Weingarten

Lawrence Weingarten
Born(1897-12-30)December 30, 1897
DiedFebruary 5, 1975(1975-02-05) (aged 77)
Resting placeHillside Memorial Park Cemetery
OccupationFilm producer
Years active1921–1968
Spouse(s)
Sylvia Thalberg
(m. 1928; div. 1939)

Jessie Marmorston
(m. 1945; died 1975)

Lawrence Weingarten (December 30, 1897 – February 5, 1975) was an American film producer. He was best known for working for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and producing some of the studio's most prestigious films such as Adam's Rib (1949), I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958).

During his career, Weingarten was nominated for an Academy Award in 1959 and was given the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1974.

Early life and career

Weingarten was born in Chicago, Illinois on December 30, 1897. He began his career as a publicity man for Thomas H. Ince and First National Pictures. In 1921, he independently produced a series of Biblical films. He was also involved in the production of Buster Keaton comedies, as well as Marie Dressler and Polly Moran films early in his career.[1]

Weingarten joined MGM under contract as an associate producer in 1927 and for many years was a co‐head of the MGM editorial board. During his almost forty year long tenure, he produced 75 films, including A Day at the Races (1937), Adam's Rib (1949), Pat and Mike (1952), The Tender Trap (1955), I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955), Don't Go Near the Water (1957) and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958). In 1962, he served as a president of the Screen Producers Guild. He retired in 1968 and received the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1974.

Personal life

Weingarten was married to Sylvia Thalberg from 1928 to 1939 and Jessie Marmorston from 1945 until his death.

Death

He died at the age of 77 on February 5, 1975 of leukemia. He was interred at the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery.[2]

Filmography as producer

References

  1. ^ "Lawrence Weingarten, 77, Dies; Produced 75 Movies for M‐G‐M". The New York Times. February 9, 1975. Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  2. ^ "Lawrence Weingarten (1897–1975)". Find a Grave. Retrieved December 8, 2019.

External links