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Jupiter LXI

Jupiter LXI, originally known as S/2003 J 19, is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003.[1][2]

Jupiter LXI
Discovery
Discovered byBrett J. Gladman
Discovery dateApril 2003
Orbital characteristics
Mean orbit radius
23-24,000,000km
699.125 days
Inclination165°
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
≈ 1 km

S/2003 J 19 is about 2 kilometres in diameter, and orbits Jupiter at an average distance of 22,709 Mm in 699.125 days, at an inclination of 165° to the ecliptic (164° to Jupiter's equator), in a retrograde direction and with an eccentricity of 0.1961.

It belongs to the Carme group, made up of irregular retrograde moons orbiting Jupiter at a distance ranging between 23 and 24 Gm and at an inclination of about 165°.

This moon was lost following its discovery in 2003.[3][4][5] It was recovered in 2018[6] and given its permanent designation that year.[7]

References

  1. ^ IAUC 8125: S/2003 J 19 and S/2003 J 20 Archived 2006-05-01 at the Wayback Machine 2003 April (discovery)
  2. ^ MPEC 2003-G64: S/2003 J 19 2003 April (discovery and ephemeris)
  3. ^ Beatty, Kelly (4 April 2012). "Outer-Planet Moons Found — and Lost". www.skyandtelescope.com. Sky & Telescope. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  4. ^ Brozović, Marina; Jacobson, Robert A. (9 March 2017). "The Orbits of Jupiter's Irregular Satellites". The Astronomical Journal. 153 (4): 147. Bibcode:2017AJ....153..147B. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aa5e4d.
  5. ^ Jacobson, B.; Brozović, M.; Gladman, B.; Alexandersen, M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Veillet, C. (28 September 2012). "Irregular Satellites of the Outer Planets: Orbital Uncertainties and Astrometric Recoveries in 2009–2011". The Astronomical Journal. 144 (5): 132. Bibcode:2012AJ....144..132J. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/144/5/132.
  6. ^ "MPEC 2018-O08 : S/2003 J 19". Minor Planet Center. International Astronomical Union. Retrieved 7 August 2018.
  7. ^ "M.P.C. 111804" (PDF). Minor Planet Center. International Astronomical Union. Retrieved 30 September 2018.