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Italian training ship Capricia

History
Name: Capricia
Operator: Italian Navy
Builder: Bengt Plym on A/B Neglinge-Varvet shipyard of Saltsjöbaden, Sweden
Launched: October 1963
Commissioned: 1963
Recommissioned: January 1993
In service: 1
Homeport: La Spezia
Identification: ITA 12712
Motto: Nulla nos via tardat eunte
Fate: in service
Notes: Pennant number A5322
General characteristics
Type: Yawl
Tonnage: 55 t (54 long tons) full load
Length:
  • - 22.55 m (74 ft 0 in) LOA[1]
  • - 16.46 m (54.0 ft) LPP
Beam: 5.06 m (16 ft 7 in)
Draught: 3.14 m (10 ft 4 in)
Sail plan: 254 m2 (2,730 sq ft)
Speed: 6.0 knots (11.1 km/h; 6.9 mph) by engine prop
Range: 1.000 nmi (1.852 km; 1.151 mi) at 6.0 knots (11.1 km/h; 6.9 mph) (on engine prop)
Complement:
  • - 14, of which:
  • - 5 crew
  • - 9 guests
Notes:

Capricia is a yawl, active as a sail training vessel for the Italian Navy[2]

History

The Bermudian yawl Capricia was built by Bengt Plym shipyard in Sweden, on a project by Sparkman & Stephens New York City (United States) (number 1645), the world famous yacht design firm.

The vessel is entirely made of wood: white oak for the structure, mahogany for the planking, teak for the deck, Canadian spruce for the masts.

The original owner was Einar Hansen, Malmö, Sweden.

Capricia has a copal-varnished hull and brick red sails that make her instantly recognisable. Having won the Fastnet in 1965, she was purchased by Fiat boss Gianni Agnelli who held on to her until 1993 when he donated her to the Italian Navy.

The Agnelli family bought it in 1971 and the boat went through a thorough renovation of the interior, which included the creation of an unusual[clarification needed] bathroom with a large bathtub. The latter[who?] used Capricia as a training vessel, with cadets from the Italian Naval Academy in Livorno spending regular periods aboard. Each year she embarks on a training cruise which often includes calls to various classic sailing rallies and regattas.

References

  1. ^ "Sparkman & Stephens: Capricia - Design 1645". Sparkmanstephens.blogspot.it. 2011-03-09. Retrieved 2017-01-12. 
  2. ^ "Capricia - Marina Militare". Marina.difesa.it. Retrieved 2017-01-12.