This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

Italian aircraft carrier Cavour

Cavour (550).jpg
Cavour
History
Italy
Name: Cavour
Namesake: Camillo Benso, conte di Cavour
Ordered: 22 November 2000
Builder: Fincantieri
Laid down: 17 July 2001
Launched: 20 July 2004
Commissioned: 27 March 2008
In service: 10 June 2009
Homeport: La Spezia
Identification: Pennant number: 550
Motto: In arduis servare mentem
Status: Active
Notes: Cost: € (EUR) 1.390 millions to 2010 year
General characteristics
Type: Aircraft carrier
Displacement: 30,000 t (30,000 long tons) full load; [1]
Length: - 244 m (800 ft 6 in) LOA[2]
Beam:
  • - 29.1 m (95 ft 6 in)
  • - 39 m (127 ft 11 in) moulded breadth
Draught: 8.7 m (28 ft 7 in)
Propulsion:
Speed: +29 knots (54 km/h; 33 mph) (Max sustained speed, 85% MCR)
Range: 7,000 nmi (13,000 km; 8,100 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph)
Complement:
  • - 1.202 (90 more on option) of which:
  • - 5 Flag Officers and VIP’s
  • - 486 crew
  • - 211 embarked air wing
  • - 140 C4 staff
  • - 360 troops (90 more on option)
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • - Selex RAN-40L 3D L-band long-range radar[3]
  • - Selex ES EMPAR (SPY-790) multifunction radar
  • - Selex ES RAN-30X/I RASS (SPS-791) surface radar[3]
  • - 2 × SELEX ES RTN-25X Orion, fire direction radars
  • - PAR (Precision Approach Radar) Selex ES MM/SPN-720
  • - PALS (Precision Approach and Landing System) Telephonics AN/SPN-41A [4]
  • - 2 x GEM Elettronica MM/SPN-753(v)10 navigation radars
  • - Selex ES SIR-R/S IFF system[3]
  • - TACAN SRN-15 A
  • - WASS SNA-2000 Mine Avoidance Sonar (Leonardo Thesan)
  • - 2 x Selex ES IRST SASS (Silent Acquisition and Surveillance System)
  • - GEM Elettronica IRST EOSS-100
  • - underwater telephone
Electronic warfare
& decoys:
Armament:
Aircraft carried:
  • - flight deck: 232.60 m (763 ft 1 in) x 34.5 m (113 ft 2 in)
  • - 20–30[5]
  • hangar capacity:
  • - 134.2 m (440 ft 3 in) x 21.0 m (68 ft 11 in)
  • - 8 × AV-8B Harrier IIs or
  • - 12 × AgustaWestland AW101
Notes: 4 LCVP

Cavour (Italian: portaerei Cavour) is an Italian aircraft carrier[6] launched in 2004. It is the flagship of the Italian Navy.

Design

Cavour (foreground) operating with Harry S. Truman (middle) and Charles de Gaulle (background) in the Gulf of Oman, 2013
Cavour maneuvering in the Gulf of Naples.

The ship is designed to combine fixed wing V/STOL and helicopter air operations, command and control operations and the transport of military or civil personnel and heavy vehicles. The 134 m (440 ft), 2,800 m2 (30,000 sq ft) hangar space can double as a vehicle hold capable of holding up to 24 main battle tanks (typically Ariete) or many more lighter vehicles (50 Dardo IFV, 100+ Iveco LMV), and is fitted aft with access ramps rated to 70 tons, as well as two elevators rated up to 30 tons for aircraft. Cavour can also operate as landing platform helicopter, accommodating heavy transport helicopters (AgustaWestland UH-101A ASH) and 325 marines (91 more, on option).[7] The Cavour has a displacement of 27,900 tons but can reach more than 30,000 tons at full military capacity.[8]

It complements the Italian navy's other aircraft carrier, the Giuseppe Garibaldi.

The Italian Navy will replace its 16 Harriers with 15 (originally 22) Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II.[9] The F-35B schedule is uncertain, but it is planned to modify Cavour to support the F-35B by 2016.[10] Cavour will have room for ten F-35Bs in the hangar, and six more parked on deck.[9]

Construction

Cavour was laid down by Fincantieri in June 2001, and was launched from the Riva Trigoso shipyard in Sestri Levante, on 20 July 2004.[11] Sea trials began in December 2006, and she was officially commissioned 27 March 2008. Full operational capability (FOC) was reached 10 June 2009.

Service history

On 19 January 2010, Cavour was dispatched to Haiti as part of Operation White Crane, Italy's operation for 2010 Haiti earthquake relief.[12] This was the first mission of the aircraft carrier, where it supplemented international efforts to provide relief for the victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Cavour Class". Fincantieri.com. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  3. ^ a b c "Finmeccanica on board of Cavour - DETAIL - Finmeccanica Naval Capabilities". finmeccanica.com. Retrieved 18 January 2016. 
  4. ^ "Griffon Subsidiary Announces $3.6 Million Contract Award from Italian Navy for Aircraft Carrier Landing System; Telephonics Continues Expansion into European Markets". Business Wire. 2004-09-13. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  5. ^ "Cavour Aircraft Carrier, Italy". Naval-technology.com. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 
  6. ^ "Cavour - Marina Militare". Marina.difesa.it. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  7. ^ [www.marina.difesa.it]
  8. ^ [2]
  9. ^ a b Nativi, Andy; Menon, Jay; Sweetman, Bill (5 April 2012). "Navies Worldwide Invest In Sea-Based Airpower". Aviation Week. 
  10. ^ ARG. "F-35B on Italian "Cavour" aircraft carrier". Military-today.com. Retrieved 4 December 2011. 
  11. ^ "Italian Navy Launches Conte di Cavour-Class Carrier". Sea Power. 1 September 2004. Retrieved 23 June 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (Subscription required (help)). 
  12. ^ "Photostory: Portaerei Cavour, gli aiuti per Haiti" (in Italian). ANSA. 4 February 2010. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 
  13. ^ "La portaerei Cavour pronta a partire per Haiti" (in Italian). la Repubblica.it. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 

Sources

  • Cosentino, Michael (2014). "Cavour: A Multi-Role Aircraft Carrier for the Italian Navy". In Jordan, John. Warship 2014. London: Conway. pp. 93–111. ISBN 978-1-84486-236-8. 

External links