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Insulin detemir

Insulin detemir
Clinical data
Trade namesLevemir
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
MedlinePlusa606012
License data
Pregnancy
category
  • US: B (No risk in non-human studies)
Routes of
administration
Subcutaneous
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability60% (when administered s.c.)
Elimination half-life5–7 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
DrugBank
ChemSpider
  • none
UNII
KEGG
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC267H402N64O76S6
Molar mass5913 g/mol g·mol−1
 ☒N☑Y (what is this?)  (verify)

Insulin detemir, sold under the brand name Levemir among others, is a long-acting insulin used to treat diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2.[1] It is used by injection under the skin.[1] It is effective for up to 24 hours.[1]

Common side effects include low blood sugar, allergic reactions, pain at the site of injection, and weight gain.[1] Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding appears safe.[2] It works by increasing the amount of glucose that tissues take in and decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver.[1]

Insulin detemir was approved for medical use in the United States in 2005.[1] In the United Kingdom it costs the NHS about £2.80 per 100 units as of 2019.[3] In the United States the wholesale cost of this amount is about US$29.50.[4] In 2016 it was the 121st most prescribed medication in the United States with more than 6 million prescriptions.[5]

Medical use

It is used to treat diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2.[1] With respect to blood sugar management, it appears to work at least as well as NPH insulin and insulin glargine.[1]

Side effects

Common side effects include low blood sugar, allergic reactions, pain at the site of injection, and weight gain.[1] Use in pregnancy and breastfeeding appears safe.[2]

Chemistry

It is an insulin analogue in which a fatty acid (myristic acid) is bound to the lysine amino acid at position B29. It is quickly absorbed after which it binds to albumin in the blood through its fatty acid at position B29. It then slowly dissociates from this complex.

Society and culture

On June 13, 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public health advisory for insulin determir after learning that 129,000 stolen vials reappeared and were being sold in the U.S. market. The FDA warned that the stolen vials "may not have been stored and handled properly and may be dangerous for patients to use." The stolen vials were identified as lots XZF0036, XZF0037, and XZF0038.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Insulin Detemir Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Insulin detemir Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Warnings". Drugs.com. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  3. ^ British national formulary : BNF 76 (76 ed.). Pharmaceutical Press. 2018. p. 701. ISBN 9780857113382.
  4. ^ "NADAC as of 2019-02-27". Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  5. ^ "The Top 300 of 2019". clincalc.com. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  6. ^ "FDA Issues Public Health Advisory Regarding Levemir Insulin". 13 June 2009. Archived from the original on 17 July 2009. Retrieved 9 March 2019.

External links