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Hungarian units of measurement

A number of units of measurement were used in Hungary to measure length, area, volume, and so on. The metric system has been adopted in Hungary since 1874 and has been compulsory since 1876.[1][2]

Unit before the metric system

The system before the metric system was the old Vienna system.[1]

Length

Several units were used to measure length. Some units are given below:[1][3][4]

  • mérföld – Mile, 24000 láb, 7.585944 km (4.713687 mi)
  • rúd – Rod, 2 öl, 6.32162 m (20.7402 ft)
  • öl – Fathom, 10 láb, 3.160810 m (10.37011 ft)
  • kettőslépés – Double step, 6 láb, 1.896486 m (6.22207 ft)
  • lépés – Step, 3 láb, 94.8243 cm (3.11103 ft)
  • rőf – Ell, 2 láb, 63.2162 cm (2.07402 ft)
  • láb – Foot, 31.6081 cm (1.03701 ft)
  • arasz – Span, 10 ujj, 19.7551 cm (7.7776 in)
  • tenyér – Palm, 4 ujj, 7.9020 cm (3.1110 in)
  • hüvelyk – Thumb, 1​13 ujj, 2.6340 cm (1.0370 in)
  • ujj – Finger, ​116 láb, 1.9755 cm (0.7778 in)

One arsin was equal to 23.01084 in and one stab was equal to 5.18565 ft.[5]

Mass

One oka was equal from 2.78 to 3.082 lb.[5]

Area

Several units were used to measure area. Some units are given below:[1][3]

1 hold = 4316 m2 = 1.0665 acre

1 meile2 = 6978 ha

Volume

A number of units were used to measure volume. Some units are given below:[1][3]

1 akó (eimer) = 54.30 l

1 halbe = ​164 akó

1 icce = ​164 akó

1 metzen = 62.53 l

1 akó = 62.53 l

One fass was equal to 52.545 gallons.[5] The value of eimer was varied from 15.03 (in Upper Hungary) to 19.37 (in Lower Hungary).

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Washburn, E.W. (1926). International Critical Tables of Numerical Data, Physics, Chemistry and Technology. New York: McGraw-Hil Book Company, Inc. p. 8.
  2. ^ Cardarelli, F. (2003). Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights and Measures. Their SI Equivalences and Origins. London: Springer. p. 7. ISBN 978-1-4471-1122-1.
  3. ^ a b c Cardarelli, F. (2003). Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights and Measures. Their SI Equivalences and Origins. London: Springer. p. 105. ISBN 978-1-4471-1122-1.
  4. ^ Bogdán, István (1990). Magyarországi hossz- és földmértékek, 1601–1874 (in Hungarian). Budapest: Akadémiai kiadó. p. 230. ISBN 978-9-6305-5286-8.
  5. ^ a b c Clarke, F.W. (1891). Weights Measures and Money of All Nations. New York: D. Appleton & Company. p. 43.