This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

High Court of Justiciary

High Court of Justiciary
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (Government in Scotland).svg
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom as used by the Courts in Scotland
Established 1672; 345 years ago (1672)
Country Scotland
Location
Composition method Appointed by the Monarch on recommendation of the First Minister of Scotland or Scottish Ministers who receive a recommendation from the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland
Authorized by
  • Courts Act 1672[1]
  • Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995[2]
Decisions are appealed to Limited appeals on points of law to Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
Judge term length Mandatory retirement at age 75
No. of positions 35[3]
Website www.scotcourts.gov.uk
Lord Justice General
Currently Colin Sutherland, Lord Carloway
Since 18 December 2015
Lord Justice Clerk
Currently Lady Dorrian
Since 13 April 2016

The High Court of Justiciary is the supreme criminal court in Scotland. The High Court is both a trial court and a court of appeal. As a trial court, the High Court sits on circuit at Parliament House or the former Sheriff Court building in Edinburgh, or in dedicated buildings in Glasgow and Aberdeen. The High Court sometimes sits in various smaller towns in Scotland, where it uses the local sheriff court building. As an appeal court the High Court sits only in Edinburgh.

On one occasion the High Court of Justiciary sat outside Scotland, at Zeist in the Netherlands during the Pan Am Flight 103 bombing trial, as the Scottish Court in the Netherlands. At Zeist the High Court sat both as a trial court, and an appeal court for the initial appeal by Abdelbaset al-Megrahi.

The president of the High Court is the Lord Justice General, who holds office ex officio by virtue of being Lord President of the Court of Session, and his depute is the Lord Justice Clerk. The remaining judges are the Lords Commissioners of Jusiticiary, who hold office ex officio by virtue of being appointed as Senators of the College of Justice and judges of the Court of Session. As a court of first instance trials are usually heard with a jury of 15 and a single Lord Commissioner of Justiciary; the jury can convict on a majority verdict. In some cases, such as the trial of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi and Lamin Khalifah Fhimah for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, a trial can be heard by a bench of judges alone; sitting without a jury.

As an appeal court the hearings are always without a jury, with two judges sitting to hear an appeal against sentence, and three judges sit to hear an appeal against conviction. The High Court will hear appeals from the sheriff courts of Scotland where the trial was under solemn proceedings; the High Court will also hear referrals on points of law from the Sheriff Appeal Court, and from summary proceedings in the Sheriff courts and justice of the peace courts.

Cases can be remitted to the High Court by the sheriff courts after conviction for sentencing, where a sheriff believes that their sentencing powers are inadequate. The High Court can impose a life sentence but the sheriff has a limit of five years sentencing; both can issue an unlimited fine.

As of May 2017, the Lord Justice General was Lord Carloway, and the Lord Justice Clerk was Lady Dorrian, and there were a total of 35 Lords Commissioners of Justiciary.

History

Justiciar

The origins derive from the Justiciar and College of Justice, as well as from the medieval royal courts and barony courts. The medieval Justiciar (royal judge) took its name from the justices who originally travelled around Scotland hearing cases on circuit or 'ayre'. From 1524, the Justiciar or a depute was required to have a "permanent base" in Edinburgh.[4][5]

The King of Scots sometimes sat in judgment of cases in the early King's Court, and it appears that appeals could be taken from the King's Court to the Parliament of Scotland in civil cases but not in criminal ones. In 1532 the College of Justice was founded, separating civil and criminal jurisdiction between two distinct courts. The King's Court was, however, normally the responsibility of the Justiciar. The Justiciar normally appointed several deputes to assist in the administration of justice, and to preside in his absence. A legally qualified clerk advised the Justiciar and his deputes as they were generally noblemen and often not legally qualified. This clerk prepared all the indictments and was keeper of the records. Eventually the influence of the clerk increased until the clerk gained both a vote in the court, and a seat on the bench as the Justice-Clerk.[4][6]

Courts Act 1672

The High Court in its modern form was founded in 1672 by the Courts Act 1672,[7] when five of the Lords of Session (judges of the Court of Session) were added as permanent judges of the Justice Court. Previously the Lord Justice General had appointed deputes to preside in the court. From 1672 to 1887, the High Court consisted of the Lord Justice General, Lord Justice Clerk, and five Lords of Session.[4]

The Court Act 1672 also gave statutory effect to the position of the Lord Justice Clerk, and the Lord Justice-General was made president of the Court, and the Justice-Clerk vice-president. During the period when the office of Lord Justice-General was held by noblemen the Lord Justice-Clerk was virtual head of the Justiciary Court.[4]

Treaty of Union

Article XIX of the Treaty of Union that united Scotland and England into Great Britain preserved the High Court of Justiciary, though now the High Court was subject to the Parliament of Great Britain which could enact "...regulations for the better administration of Justice". Dominic Scullion, writing in the Aberdeen Student Law Review in 2010, identified that the Union of England and Scotland saw an increase in references to English law and cases in the reports of the High Court. However, Scullion identified that it was only in the latter half of the 20th Century that the judgments of the High Court were directly influenced by English decisions and precedent.[8]

The High Court of Justiciary remained the final authority on all matters of criminal law after the Act of Union, though the Parliament of Great Britain appears to have had appellate jurisdiction through the judicial functions of the House of Lords this appeared to have little effect in practice.[8][4] In 1713 a case (Magistrates of Elgin v. Ministers of Elgin) was heard by the House of Lords which overturned a decision of the High Court. However, in 1781 the House of Lords resolved that there could be no appeal from the High Court, as no right of appeal had existed beyond the Court beyond the Treaty of Union.

19th Century

Unification of judiciary

In 1830 the Court of Session Act 1830 united the offices of Lord President of the Court of Session and Lord Justice General, with the person appointed as Lord President assuming the office of Lord Justice General ex officio.[9]

In 1834 the five Lords of Session who were appointed as Lords Commissioners of Justiciary were paid an additional allowance of £600 over their basic salary of £2,000.[10][note 1] A Select Committee of the House of Commons was appointed to investigate the remuneration and working conditions of the Lords of Session and Lords Commissioners of Justiciary. The Select Committee recommended that all the Lords of Session should be made Lords Commissioners of Justiciary and that the additional allowance be abolished. At the same time the Committee recommended that the basic salary of a Senator be increased to £3,000.[11]

The membership of the court remained unchanged until 1887 when all of the Senators of the College of Justice were made Lords Commissioners of Justiciary, by the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1887.[12] Writing in 1896, Charles Pearson attested that no appeal was competent from the High Court to the House of Lords.[6]

Supremacy of High Court

The House of Lords made a final determination in the case of Mackintosh v. Lord Advocate (1876) 2 App. Cas. 41 that it had no jurisdiction over criminal appeals, as it had inherited the power of the Parliament of Scotland to hear civil appeals, but that the pre-union Parliament did have not not any jurisdiction to hear criminal appeals.[13][14]

20th Century

Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995

In 1913, Edwin Keedy, writing in the Journal of the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, would affirm that the High Court "is the Supreme Court for the trial of criminal causes".[4]

The supremacy of the High Court was affirmed by Section 124 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995, which stated:

...every interlocutor and sentence pronounced by the High Court under this Part of this Act shall be final and conclusive and not subject to review by any court whatsoever...

— Section 124, Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995

Scottish devolution

Scottish devolution and the establishment of the Scottish Parliament by the Scotland Act 1998 introduced the right to refer points of law to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Such points of law related to human rights compatibility issues or related to devolution issues. Devolution issues are concerned with the legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament and the executive functions of the Scottish Government under the Scotland Act 1998.[15][16]

21st Century

Scottish Court in the Netherlands

From May 2000 until March 2002 the High Court of Justiciary sat as the Scottish Court in the Netherlands to try Abdelbaset al-Megrahi and Lamin Khalifah Fhimah for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103. The Pan Am Flight 103 bombing trial required a treaty between the Government of the United Kingdom and Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands which created extraterritoriality for the Scottish Court, with Camp Zeist in Utrecht (a disused United States Air Force base) made a subject of Scots law.[17]

Legal effect was given to the treaty in the United Kingdom by the High Court of Justiciary Order 1998, an Order in Council. The order empowered the Lord Justice Clerk to appoint three Lords Commissioners of Justiciary to sit as bench trial as both trier of fact and for determining any points of law. The High Court had full authority to determine contempt of court relating to the proceedings.[18]

Following the conviction, which was upheld on appeal of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, the Scottish Court in the Netherlands ceased to sit. Subsequent appeals were heard in Scotland.[19]

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

The jurisdiction of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in human rights and devolution issues was transferred to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005.[20] Such a transfer was not without controversy, as commentators, including the Law Society of Scotland and the Advocate General for Scotland, noted that this notionally placed an English court in a position of superiority to the High Court.[13][21][22]

In May 2013, the Supreme Court's guidance on its jurisdiction over Scottish appeals stated that:[23]

The changes to the Supreme Court’s jurisdiction, first, in Scottish criminal cases as a result of the Scotland Act 2012 (‘the 2012 Act’) which ensured that the High Court of Justiciary retained the power ultimately to resolve cases once the Supreme Court has determined the legal question at issue

— The Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in Scottish Appeals

Section 35 of the Scotland Act 2012 modified the procedure for referrals by removing the ability of the Supreme Court to determine the final judgment of the case; in essence a criminal case cannot be remitted to the Supreme Court. The Scotland Act 2012 requires that once the point of law has been decided upon by the Supreme Court, it is for the High Court to resolve the case. An issue can be referred to the Supreme Court either by the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary who are presiding, the Lord Advocate, or the Advocate General for Scotland. Though where two or more Lords Commissioners are presiding they may determine the human rights issue without referral to the Supreme Court.[23][24]

Remit and jurisdiction

First instance jurisdiction

The High Court has jurisdiction over all crimes in Scotland unless restricted by statute. The High Court has exclusive jurisdiction over serious crimes such as treason, murder, and rape and, in practice, deals with armed robbery, drug trafficking, and sexual offences involving children (over which it shares jurisdiction with the sheriff court).[15]

Court entrance the High Court of Justiciary situated at the Saltmarket in Glasgow

As a court of first instance the court sits regularly in various places in Scotland, with permanent seats in Edinburgh, Glasgow and Aberdeen. There are sittings when required in Dumbarton, Lanark, Livingston, Paisley and Stirling.[25]

Trials in the High Court are usually jury trials, with a single Lord Commissioner of Justiciary presiding (although two or more judges may sit in important or difficult cases) with a jury of fifteen individuals; in Scotland this is known as solemn proceedings.[25] Under the Scottish legal system, the jury can convict on a majority verdict of at least eight jurors, and need not return a unanimous verdict. The Scottish legal system also permits a verdict of 'not proven' as well as verdicts of 'guilty' or 'not guilty'. Juries may add a rider to their verdict as additional commentary on their verdict. The 'not proven' verdict may be given when a jury is not prepared to utter 'not guilty' or where the jury has lingering doubts; however if eight jurors cannot agree on an accused's guilt or on an alternative verdict, then the accused will be acquitted.[26]

Cases in the High Court are prosecuted in the public interest by the Lord Advocate, who is usually represented in such cases by Advocates Depute.[27] A private prosecution can be brought before the High Court, but this is very rare and difficult as it requires the concurrence of the Lord Advocate and for the High Court to issue a bill for criminal letters.[4]:739 When families of the victims of the 2014 Glasgow bin lorry crash applied for such a bill, their request was denied by the High Court in 2016 on the basis that there was insufficient evidence. The Lord Justice Clerk, Lady Dorrian, along with Lord Menzies and Lord Drummond Young further concluded that the case did not present special circumstances to enable granting of the bill.[28][29]

Bail can be granted by the High Court to any accused person and "bail is to be granted to an accused person except where there is good reason for refusing bail." The Bail, Judicial Appointments etc. (Scotland) Act 2000, an Act of the Scottish Parliament, had removed the previous restrictions on bail that meant that murder and treason were not ordinarily bailable.[30] However, a person could be bailed when accused of these of crimes on application of the Lord Advocate or by a decision of the High Court itself.[31] The Criminal Proceedings etc. (Reform) (Scotland) Act 2007 did reintroduce restrictions on the granting of bail by requiring exceptional circumstances to be shown when a person is accused of violent, sexual, or drugs offences, and they have a prior conviction for a similar offence.[32]

In Scotland, the focus is normally for those who are opposed to bail to convince the courts that bail should not be granted.[31] With the procurator fiscal given guidance to use the nature and gravity of an offence as grounds to oppose bail.[33]

Sentencing on conviction by sheriff court

Following a conviction under solemn proceedings in a sheriff court, Section 195 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 allows a sheriff to remit the case to the High Court for sentencing, should the sheriff believes their powers of sentencing to be inadequate for the crime committed.[2] A sheriff in solemn proceedings can impose a maximum sentence of up to 5 years imprisonment or an unlimited fine, and the High Court can impose a life sentence (unless a lesser maximum sentence is prescribed by statute) as well as an unlimited fine. Once a case is remitted, the High Court can treat the case as if it had been tried before a Lord Commissioner of Justiciary.[34][15]

Appellate jurisdiction

High Court of Justiciary in Edinburgh

Leave to appeal is granted by a Lord Commissioner of Justiciary in chambers under sections 106 and 107 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 when a person is convicted in solemn procedure in either the High Court or sheriff courts, with the High Court sitting as the Appeal Court.[2]:Sections 106 and 107

Appeals against convictions or sentence in summary procedure heard in sheriff courts and justice of the peace courts are now heard by the Sheriff Appeal Court. However, referrals on points of law may be heard in the High Court from the Sheriff Appeal Court with the permission of the High Court. Two judges sit to hear an appeal against sentence, and three judges sit to hear an appeal against conviction. The High Court of Justiciary sits as an appeal court in Edinburgh.[15][25]

The High Court, as a collegiate court, has the ability to convene a bench of greater numbers of Lords Commissioners of Justiciary to overturn decisions and precedent established by previous appeals. Such a decision is made by the High Court on its own initiative. It is possible for the entire High Court to sit in determination of an appeal.[35]

In exceptional circumstances, a person may petition the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission, who have the authority to refer an appeal back to the High Court of Justiciary, if the Commission determine that a miscarriage of justice has or might have occurred.[36]

Under Section 35 of the Scotland Act 2012, the High Court as an Appeal Court will also hear referrals on human rights compatibility issues from the Sheriff Appeal Court, sheriff courts, and from cases being heard at first-instance by a single Lord Commissioner of Justiciary. The High Court can then make a determination on that issue, or it can refer the matter to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.[24]

Appeals from the High Court

Devolution and human rights issues

The High Court of Justiciary has the final authority on matters of criminal law in Scotland, and thus no appeal beyond the High Court is possible on the grounds of sentence or conviction.[14][23] However, it is possible to refer a point of law to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom relating to human rights compatibility issues or relating to devolution issues. Devolution issues are concerned with the legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament and the executive functions of the Scottish Government under the Scotland Act 1998.[15][16] Such referrals are made to the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom under Schedule 6 of the Scotland Act 1998 or Section 288A of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995.[2][37][20] For a referral to proceed permission must be granted by two or more Lords Commissioners of Justiciary, or by the Supreme Court itself.[16]

The most frequent devolution issues raised related to Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which mandates the right to a fair trial, and the role of the Lord Advocate who is both the chief public prosecutor and a member of the Scottish Government. Under the Scotland Act 1998 the Lord Advocate could do nothing that was incompatible with the European Convention on Human Rights, and should his actions be deemed incomparable then they were null and void.[23] This led to the case of Cadder v HM Advocate where the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom ruled that the police in Scotland could not question a suspect without granting that person access to a solicitor.[38] This was one case, along with Fraser v HM Advocate, that led the Scottish Government to raise concerns with HM Government that it appeared that "virtually any objection, challenge, or point of law can be characterised as a devolution issue." Thus undermining the High Court's final jurisdiction in criminal matters.[39] The Scotland Act 2012 modified provisions around devolution issues by no longer renderring null and void those actions of the Lord Advocate that were incompatible with the European Convention, but still allowing a right to appeal against those actions on grounds of incompatibility.[40][24][41]

Supreme Court of the United Kingdom

The Supreme Court of the United Kingdom was established by the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, and is the highest court in the United Kingdom for civil cases and those matters relating to human rights and devolution.[42] Prior to the establishment of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom devolution issues were decided by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, whose members were the Lords of Appeal in Ordinary (who exercised the judicial functions of the House of Lords.) However, the two bodies were legally and constitutionally separate.[14][43]

European Courts

In the most exceptional of circumstances, an appeal may be made to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), subject to an application for permission from both the High Court of Justiciary and the United Kingdom Supreme Court (UKSC) being granted, or to the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR), or both.[citation needed]

Acts of Adjournal

The High Court of Justiciary as a Court, or the Lord Justice General, Lord Justice Clerk and Lords Commissioners of Justiciary as a body, have the power to regulate criminal procedure in the criminal courts in Scotland: regulations can be made for the High Court, sheriff courts (summary and solemn procedures), and the justice of the peace courts. Such regulations are promulgated by Acts of Adjournal, which take the form of subordinate legislation as Scottish Statutory Instruments, under powers granted by Section 305 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995.[2]:Section 305 Schedule 6 of the Scotland Act 1998 also grants that Acts of Adjournal can be used to regulate the procedure for referring a question of law relating to a devolution issue to either the High Court or the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom.[37]:Schedule 6

Section 305 of the 1995 Act states:

(1) The High Court may by Act of Adjournal—

(a) regulate the practice and procedure in relation to criminal procedure;
(b) make such rules and regulations as may be necessary or expedient to carry out the purposes and accomplish the objects of any enactment (including an enactment in this Act) in so far as it relates to criminal procedure;
(c) subject to subsection (5)[note 2] below, to fix and regulate the fees payable in connection with summary criminal proceedings; and
(d) make provision for the application of sums paid under section 220 of this Act and for any matter incidental thereto.

(2) The High Court may by Act of Adjournal modify, amend or repeal any enactment (including an enactment in this Act) in so far as that enactment relates to matters with respect to which an Act of Adjournal may be made under subsection (1) above...

— Section 305, Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995[2]:Section 305

Thus the Lord Justice General, Lord Justice Clerk, and Lords Commissioners of Justiciary have the power to modify and amend primary legislation, where that primary legislation deals with a matter of criminal procedure. The Criminal Courts Rules Council on 8 February 2016 considered Section 288BA of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (which prescribes rules for dockets and indictments for sexual offences) and asked the Lord President's Private Office to consider if this could be modified by Act of Adjournal.[44] A draft Act of Adjournal was also prepared in 2011 to amend the 1995 Act as the Rules Council was awaiting primary legislation, and the Rules Council agreed to proceed with the Act of Adjournal.[45] The Act of Adjournal amended the 1995 Act by adding Sections 75C and 137ZB to enable the court to discharge, vary and change the diet (sittings) of a case.[46]

Rights of audience

Members of the Faculty of Advocates, known as advocates or counsel, and as of 1990 also some solicitors, known as solicitor-advocates, have practically exclusive right of audience rights of audience in the court.[47] Until 1990 only advocates had any right of audience before the High Court, but the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland Act) 1990 allowed solicitors to apply for enhanced rights and become solicitor-advocates.[48]

Judges and office holders

President and judges

The court's president is the Lord Justice General; the second most senior judge is the Lord Justice Clerk; and a further 35 Senators of the College of Justice hold office as Lords Commissioners of Justiciary. The total numbers of judges is fixed by Section 1 of the Court of Session Act 1988, subject to amendment by Order in Council (the last order was made in 2016 and increased the number of judges to 35.)[49][3] Judges are appointed for life, subject to dismissal if they are found unfit for office, and subject to a compulsory retirement age of 75.[50]

The court is a unitary collegiate court, with all judges other than the Lord Justice General and the Lord Justice Clerk holding the same rank and title: Lord Commissioner of Justiciary.[25] There are 35,[51] in addition to a number of temporary judges; these temporary judges can be sheriffs principal, sheriffs, or advocates in private practice. The judges sit also in the Court of Session, where they are known as Lords of Council and Session; in the Court of Session the Lord Justice General is called the Lord President of the Court of Session.[52][53]

Lord Justice General

The Lord Justice General is the most senior judge of the High Court of Justiciary. The Lord Justice General will sit as chairperson in the Court of Criminal Appeal.[25]

Lord Justice Clerk

The Justice Clerk is the second most senior judge of the High Court, and deputises for the Lord Justice General when the latter is absent, or is unable to fulfil his duties, or when there is a vacancy for Lord Justice General. The Lord Justice Clerk will sit as chairperson in the Court of Criminal Appeal.[25]

Lords Commissioners of Justiciary

As of April 2017 the judges of the High Court of Justiciary are:[54][55]
Name Judicial title Office Year appointed to High Court
Colin J MacLean Sutherland The Rt Hon Lord Carloway Lord Justice General 2008
Leeona J Dorrian The Rt Hon Lady Dorrian Lord Justice Clerk 2012
Ann Paton The Rt Hon Lady Paton Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2007
Duncan Adam Young Menzies The Rt Hon Lord Menzies Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Anne Smith The Rt Hon Lady Smith Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Philip Hope Brodie The Rt Hon Lord Brodie Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Alastair P Campbell The Rt Hon Lord Bracadale Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2013
James Edward Drummond Young The Rt Hon Lord Drummond Young Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2013
Angus Glennie The Rt Hon Lord Glennie Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Lynda Clark The Rt Hon the Lady Clark of Calton Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2013
Alan Turnbull The Rt Hon Lord Turnbull Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Colin Malcolm Campbell The Rt Hon Lord Malcolm Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2014[56]
Colin Boyd The Rt Hon the Lord Boyd of Duncansby Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Alexander F Wylie The Hon Lord Kinclaven Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2005
S Neil Brailsford The Hon Lord Brailsford Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2006
Roderick F Macdonald The Hon Lord Uist Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2006
Hugh Matthews The Hon Lord Matthews Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2006
Paul Cullen The Hon Lord Pentland Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2008
Stephen Errol Woolman The Hon Lord Woolman Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2008
Iain Alexander Scott Peebles, QC The Hon Lord Bannatyne Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2008
Valerie E Stacey The Hon Lady Stacey Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2009
Colin Jack Tyre CBE The Hon Lord Tyre Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2010
J Raymond Doherty The Hon Lord Doherty Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2010
David Burns The Hon Lord Burns Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Margaret E Scott The Hon Lady Scott Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2012
Morag Wise The Hon Lady Wise Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2013
Iain Armstrong The Hon Lord Armstrong Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2013
Rita Rae The Hon Lady Rae Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2014
Sarah Wolffe QC The Hon Lady Wolffe Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2014
John Beckett QC The Hon Lord Beckett Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Alistair Clark QC The Hon Lord Clark Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Andrew Stewart QC The Hon Lord Ericht Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Ailsa Carmichael QC The Hon Lady Carmichael Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016
Frank Mulholland QC The Rt Hon Lord Mulholland Lord Commissioner of Justiciary 2016

Appointment

To be eligible for appointment as a Lord Commissioner of Justiciary, or temporary judge, a person must have served at least 5 years as sheriff or sheriff principal; or been an advocate for 5 years, or a solicitor with 5 years rights of audience before the Court of Session or High Court of Justiciary; or been a Writer to the Signet for 10 years (having passed the exam in civil law at least 2 years before application.)[57][58]

Appointments are made by the First Minister of Scotland on the recommendation of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland. The Judicial Appointments Board has statutory authority to make recommendations under Sections 9 to 27 of the Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008 (as amended by the Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014).[59] Appointments to the Inner House are made by the Lord President and Lord Justice Clerk, with the consent of the Scottish Ministers.[49]

Temporary judges can also be appointed by the Scottish Ministers provided that person would other be eligible for appointment as permanent judge of the High Court. Originally the power was granted by Section 35 of the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1990,[60] but the enactment was repealed and replaced by Section 123 of the Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014. Such temporary judges are appointed for a period of 5 years.[61]

Section 123 of Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014 allows the Lord Justice General to appoint former Senators, and former Justices of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom, to the High Court provided they are under 75 years of age. The tenure of such appointments is determined by the Lord Justice General.[61]

Lord Gill, Lord Justice General from 2012–2015, issued guidance in 2013 on the use temporary judges which stipulated that:

Temporary judges will be used only where there are, for reasons of a temporary nature, an insufficient number of permanent judges to meet the demands of business and the Lord President has approved their use.

— Lord Gill, Guidelines for the Use of Temporary Judges (2013)

Further stating that the preference would be to allocate business to temporary judges who were already, had previously been, a judicial office holder (namely, sheriff principal or sheriff); as opposed to using temporary judges who were practising advocates or solicitor-advocates. Lord Gill's guidance allows for such judges to be allocated to any first instance business of the High Court, but requires the approval of the Lord Justice General for their deployment in the Appeal Court.[62]

Removal from office

The Lord Justice General, Lord Justice Clerk and the Lords Commissioners of Justiciary can only be removed office after a tribunal has been convened to examine their fitness for office. The tribunal is convened at the request of the Lord Justice General (in his capacity as Lord President,) or in other circumstances if the First Minister sees fit. However, the First Minister must consult the Lord Justice General (or the Lord Justice Clerk, if the Lord Justice Generalis under investigation). Should the tribunal recommend their dismissal the Scottish Parliament can resolve that the First Minister make a recommendation to the Monarch.[63][64]

Principal Clerk of Session and Justiciary

The administration of the court is part of the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service, and is led by the Principal Clerk of Session and Justiciary.[65] The Principal Clerk is responsible for the administration of the Supreme Courts of Scotland and their associated staff. As of April 2017 the Principal Clerk was Graeme Marwick, who was also Director of the Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service.[66]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Wages and Prices | A Family Story". www.afamilystory.co.uk. 5 October 2013. Retrieved 7 May 2017. A labourer in 1834 had an annual salary of £27.17s.10d. 
  2. ^ Subsection 5 relates to court fees which are regulated by Scottish Ministers under Section 107 of the Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014, having replaced earlier rules conferred by the Courts of Law Fees (Scotland) Act 1895.

References

  1. ^ Courts Act 1672. Records of the Parliaments of Scotland. 1672. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Scottish Parliament. Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  3. ^ a b Scottish Parliament. The Maximum Number of Judges (Scotland) Order 2016 as made, from legislation.gov.uk.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Keedy, Edwin R. (1 January 1913). "Criminal Procedure in Scotland" (PDF). Journal of the American Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology. Northwestern University School of Law. 3 (5): 728–753. doi:10.2307/1132916. Retrieved 2 May 2017. 
  5. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Justiciar". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.  Accessed on 2 May 2017
  6. ^ a b Pearson, Charles (October 1896). "The Administation of Criminal Law in Scotland". The American Law Register and Review. 44 (10): 619–632. doi:10.2307/3305421. 
  7. ^ "Courts Act 1672 (as enacted)". Records of the Parliaments of Scotland. University of St Andrews. 1672. Retrieved 4 April 2017. 
  8. ^ a b Scullion, Dominic (2010). "The Union of 1707 and its Impact on Scots Law" (PDF). Aberdeen Student Law Review. Aberdeen. 1: 111–118. 
  9. ^ UK Parliament. Court Of Session Act 1830 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  10. ^ "Judges' Salary (Scotland) Hansard, 6 May 1834)". hansard.millbanksystems.com. 6 May 1834. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  11. ^ Great Britain Parliament House of Commons Select Committee on Judges' Salaries (1 July 1834). Report from Select Committee on Judges' Salaries (Scotland): With the Minutes of Evidence. London: House of Commons. 
  12. ^ UK Parliament. Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1887 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  13. ^ a b A Barrister in London (1 June 2011). "Scots get tartans in a twist about SCUK....". ofinteresttolwayers.blogspot.co.uk. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  14. ^ a b c Dymond, Glenn (20 November 2009). "The Appellate Jurisdiction of the House of Lords" (PDF). www.parliament.uk. House of Lords Library. p. 20. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  15. ^ a b c d e McCallum, Frazer (1 June 2016). "The Scottish Criminal Justice System:The Criminal Courts" (PDF). parliament.scot. Scottish Parliament Information Centre. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  16. ^ a b c "Devolution Jurisdiction | Practice direction 10 - The Supreme Court". www.supremecourt.uk. Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  17. ^ "Treaty concerning the trial (page 98)" (PDF). Retrieved 2010-06-05. 
  18. ^ Statutory Instrument 1998 No. 2251 The High Court of Justiciary (Proceedings in the Netherlands) (United Nations) Order 1998 (Coming into force 18 September 1998)
  19. ^ "Uncertain future for Camp Zeist". news.bbc.co.uk. BBC. 14 March 2002. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  20. ^ a b UK Parliament. Constitutional Reform Act 2005 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  21. ^ "The curtailment of criminal appeals to London: The Journal Online". www.journalonline.co.uk. Law Society of Scotland. 20 September 2010. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  22. ^ Advocate General for Scotland (24 September 2010). "Devolution acts and issues of the Lord Advocate". www.gov.uk. HM Government. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  23. ^ a b c d "The Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom in Scottish Appeals: Human rights, the Scotland Act 2012 and the Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014" (PDF). Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. May 2013. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  24. ^ a b c UK Parliament. Scotland Act 2012 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  25. ^ a b c d e f "About the High Court". Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  26. ^ "Jury Manual [2016]" (PDF). judiciary-scotland.org.uk. Judicial Institute for Scotland. 21 January 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  27. ^ "Who we are". www.crownoffice.gov.uk. Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  28. ^ "Bills for Criminal Letters - Judgments & Sentences - Judiciary of Scotland". www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. 9 December 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  29. ^ Stewart & Convy vs Payne / McQuade, McQuade and Reilly vs Clarke (Bill for Criminal Letters), 2016 HCJAC 122 (Appeal Court, High Court of Justiciary 9 December 2016).
  30. ^ Scottish Parliament. Bail, Judicial Appointments etc. (Scotland) Act 2000 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  31. ^ a b Wilson, John G. (1965). Hahlo, H.R.; Kahn, Ellison, eds. "Pre-Trial Criminal Procedure in Scotland: A Comparative Study". The South African Law Journal. LXXXII (2): 192–209. 
  32. ^ Scottish Parliament. Criminal Proceedings etc. (Reform) (Scotland) Act 2007 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  33. ^ "Chapter 8 - Bail | Book of Regulations" (PDF). crownoffice.gov.uk. Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service. December 2007. p. 3. Retrieved 7 May 2017. 
  34. ^ "Sheriffs - Judicial Office Holders - About the Judiciary - Judiciary of Scotland". www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017. 
  35. ^ Lord Hope of Craighead (2003). ""Decision Overruled"—Facing Up to Judicial Fallibility". Kings College Law Journal. 14 (2): 121–136. 
  36. ^ Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission for John McGinty vs HM Advocate, 2006 HCJAC 8, 8 (Appeal Court, High Court Of Justiciary 18 January 2006) (“The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission has referred the case to us on the view that there may have been a miscarriage of justice.”).
  37. ^ a b UK Parliament. Scotland Act 1998 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  38. ^ "Cadder (Appellant) v Her Majesty's Advocate (Respondent) (Scotland) - The Supreme Court" (PDF). www.supremecourt.uk. Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. 26 October 2010. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  39. ^ "Cadder Case - Background Q&A". www.gov.scot. Scottish Government. 5 November 2010. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  40. ^ Advocate General for Scotland (14 June 2011). "Scotland Bill will support human rights role of Supreme Court - GOV.UK". www.gov.uk. HM Government. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  41. ^ Cruse, Ian (11 July 2011). "House of Lords Library Note | Scotland Bill (HL Bill 79 of 2010–12)" (PDF). www.parliament.uk. House of Lords Library. p. 11. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  42. ^ UK Parliament. Constitutional Reform Act 2005 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  43. ^ "Role of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council". www.jcpc.uk. Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Retrieved 3 May 2017. 
  44. ^ "Minutes | 8 February 2016 | Criminal Courts Rules Council" (DOC). www.scotcourts.gov.uk. Scottish Courts and Tribunals Council. 17 October 2011. Retrieved 8 February 2016. 
  45. ^ "Minutes | 17 October 2001 | Criminal Courts Rules Council" (PDF). www.scotcourts.gov.uk. Scottish Courts and Tribunals Council. 17 October 2011. Retrieved 27 April 2017. 
  46. ^ Scottish Parliament. Act of Adjournal (Amendment of Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995) (Refixing diets) 2011 as made, from legislation.gov.uk.
  47. ^ "About the High Court". www.scotcourts.gov.uk. Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  48. ^ "IBA - Rights of audience in Scotland". ibanet.org. International Bar Association. 6 April 2009. Retrieved 6 April 2017. Until the introduction of the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland Act) 1990, only advocates were allowed to plead in the High Court and Court of Session, Scotland’s supreme criminal and civil courts. The Act extended rights of audience to suitably qualified solicitors and there are now about 250 registered solicitor advocates in Scotland competing for work with advocates. 
  49. ^ a b "Part 1 | Court of Session Act 1988". www.legislation.gov.uk. The National Archives. 29 July 1988. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  50. ^ "Section 26 of Judicial Pensions and Retirement Act 1993". www.legislation.gov.uk. 29 March 1993. Retrieved 2 April 2017. 
  51. ^ "Judges' Divisions February 2013" (PDF). Judiciary of Scotland. February 2013. Retrieved 2013-02-16. 
  52. ^ "Section 2, Paragraph 1, Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008", Acts of the Scottish Parliament, 2008 (6), p. 2(1), retrieved 2009-08-29, The Lord President is the Head of the Scottish Judiciary. 
  53. ^ "Section 18, Court of Session Act 1830", Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, 69, p. 18, 1830-07-23, Office of lord justice general to devolve on lord president. 
  54. ^ "Senators of the College of Justice - Judicial Office Holders - About the Judiciary - Judiciary of Scotland". www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  55. ^ "List of Senators | Judicial Office for Scotland" (PDF). www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. 2017. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  56. ^ "The Right Hon Lord Malcolm (Colin Malcolm Campbell) - Judicial Office Holders - About the Judiciary - Judiciary of Scotland". www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. Retrieved 6 April 2017. 
  57. ^ "Senators of the College of Justice - Judicial Office Holders - About the Judiciary - Judiciary of Scotland". www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. 2017. Retrieved 2 April 2017. 
  58. ^ "Eligibility for Judicial Appointment | Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland". www.judicialappointments.scot. Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland. 2016. Retrieved 4 April 2017. 
  59. ^ "Sections 9 to 18, Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008". www.legislation.gov.uk. The National Archives. 29 October 2008. Retrieved 1 April 2017. The judicial offices within the Board's remit are— (a)the office of judge of the Court of Session, ... (c)the office of temporary judge (except in any case where the individual to be appointed to the office holds or has held one of the offices mentioned in subsection (2))...] 
  60. ^ UK Parliament. Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1990 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  61. ^ a b Scottish Parliament. Courts Reform (Scotland) Act 2014 as amended (see also enacted form), from legislation.gov.uk.
  62. ^ Lord Gill (6 February 2013). "Guidelines for the Use of Temporary Judges - Issued by the Lord President" (PDF). www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. Retrieved 2 May 2017. 
  63. ^ "Chapter 5 of Judiciary and Courts (Scotland) Act 2008". www.legislation.gov.uk. The National Archives. 29 October 2008. Retrieved 3 April 2017. 
  64. ^ "Judicial independence" (PDF). judiciary-scotland.org.uk. Judicial Office for Scotland. Retrieved 3 April 2017. 
  65. ^ "Scottish Court Service An Introduction" (PDF). Scottish Court Service. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 26 May 2012. The Supreme Courts are made up of: the Court of Session, the High Court of Justiciary and the Accountant of Court's Office. The Principal Clerk of Session and Justiciary is responsible for the administration of these areas 
  66. ^ "Director and Principal Clerk of Session and Justiciary". www.scotcourts.gov.uk. Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service. Retrieved 4 April 2017. 

External links