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Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street station

 4 Avenue/9 Street
 "F" train"G" train"R" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station complex
4 Av- 9 St- Bridge.jpg
Station statistics
AddressFourth Avenue & Ninth Street
Brooklyn, NY 11215
BoroughBrooklyn
LocalePark Slope, Gowanus
Coordinates40°40′15.44″N 73°59′29.03″W / 40.6709556°N 73.9913972°W / 40.6709556; -73.9913972
DivisionB (BMT/IND)
LineBMT Fourth Avenue Line
IND Culver Line
Services      D late nights (late nights)
      N late nights (late nights)
      R all times (all times)
      W limited rush hour service only (limited rush hour service only)​
      F all times (all times)
      G all times (all times)
Transit connectionsBus transport NYCT Bus: B61; B37 (on Third Avenue)
Bus transport MTA Bus: B103
Levels2
Station code608[1]
Traffic
Passengers (2018)3,906,028 (station complex)[2]Decrease 9.7%
Rank122 out of 424

Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the elevated IND Culver Line and the underground BMT Fourth Avenue Line. It is located at the intersection of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue in Park Slope, Brooklyn and served by the:

  • F, G and R trains at all times
  • D and N trains late nights
  • W train during rush hours only, with a few trips in the peak direction

History

The BMT Fourth Avenue Line station was built first, opening on June 22, 1915 as part of the line's extension to 59th Street.[3] The IND Culver Line station opened on October 7, 1933 as part of its extension to its "temporary" terminal at Church Avenue.[4][5] A free transfer point was established between the two stations on May 28, 1959 to compensate for the loss of through Culver service via the Fourth Avenue Line.[6]

Culver Viaduct renovation

In 2007, the MTA announced a three-year renovation project of the elevated Culver Viaduct.[7] The work area covers from south of Carroll Street to north of Ditmas Avenue. For Phase 2A of the project, a temporary platform was built over the southbound express track to allow northbound trains to stop at the station. The platform was then removed for Phase 2B. For Phase 3A a temporary platform was built over the northbound express track to allow southbound trains to stop. Reconstruction of the Fourth Avenue station was completed in April 2013. As part of the project, the arch bridge over Fourth Avenue was restored with the elimination of billboards and the removal of paint over the windows.[8] The station received a public address system as part of the project. In addition, the MTA reopened the east station house to the station, after it had been closed for over 40 years.[9]

Before 2009, G service terminated at Smith–Ninth Streets, one stop to the north.[10] Terminating southbound trains used the switches just west of Fourth Avenue to enter the southbound express tracks. After being stored on the southbound express track, the G trains would start their Queens-bound runs by using the switches to enter the northbound local track.[11] The switches were taken out of regular service in 2009, when the viaduct's reconstruction started and the G was extended to Church Avenue.[12][10]

Station layout

2F Side platform, doors will open on the right
Northbound local "F" train toward Jamaica–179th Street (Smith–Ninth Streets)
"G" train toward Court Square (Smith–Ninth Streets)
Northbound express "F" express train does not stop here (AM rush)
Southbound express "F" express train does not stop here (PM rush) →
Southbound local "F" train toward Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue (Seventh Avenue)
"G" train toward Church Avenue (Seventh Avenue)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
1F Mezzanine Crossunder between platforms
Exit/Entrance, fare control, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
G Street Level Exit/Entrance
B1 East Mezzanine Fare control for northbound trains, MetroCard vending machines
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Northbound local "R" train toward Forest Hills–71st Avenue (all times except late nights), Whitehall Street–South Ferry (late nights) (Union Street)
"D" train toward 205th Street, "N" train toward Ditmars Boulevard (late nights) (Union Street)
"W" train toward Ditmars Boulevard (rush hours) (Union Street)
Northbound express "D" train "N" train do not stop here (all times except late nights)
Southbound express "D" train "N" train do not stop here (all times except late nights) →
Southbound local "R" train toward Bay Ridge–95th Street (Prospect Avenue)
"D" train toward Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue late nights ()
"N" train late nights, "W" train rush hours toward 86th Street–Gravesend (Prospect Avenue)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
West Mezzanine Fare control for southbound trains, MetroCard vending machines

Exits

Exit location[13][14] Exit type Number of exits Platform served
West side of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms
East side of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets Staircase 1 Northbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms
NW corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
NE corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street Staircase 1 Northbound Fourth Avenue Line
NW corner of 4th Avenue and 10th Street (in viaduct) Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms

The station has five entrances. There is one entrance each in the vestibules on both sides of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets. There is also an entrance on the north side of 10th Street west of Fourth Avenue, which leads to the southbound BMT Fourth Avenue Line and both IND Culver Line platforms. The other two are entrances on either northern corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street, and lead directly to the BMT Fourth Avenue Line platforms.[13][14]

IND Culver Line platforms

 4 Avenue
 "F" train"G" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
4th Avenue - Manhattan-Queens Bound Platform.jpg
Manhattan/Queens-bound platform
Station statistics
DivisionB (IND)
LineIND Culver Line
Services      F all times (all times)
      G all times (all times)
StructureElevated
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedOctober 7, 1933; 86 years ago (1933-10-07)
Station code239[1]
Station succession
Next northSmith–Ninth Streets: F all timesG all times
Next southSeventh Avenue: F all timesG all times

4th Avenue Station (IND)
MPSNew York City Subway System MPS
NRHP reference #05000673[15]
Added to NRHPJuly 6, 2005
Track layout
Former siding
to 7 Av

Fourth Avenue is a local station on the IND Culver Line that has four tracks and two side platforms.[16] The platforms are the IND's usual length of 660 feet (200 m), and the width of the platforms is 16 feet (4.9 m).[17] Both platforms have tan brick windscreens and column-less cantilevered windscreens along their entire lengths except for a small portion of the west (railroad north) end. The station has a crew quarters structure over both platforms which is constructed of brick with evidence of covered windows.

This station's fare control area is at street level underneath the platforms and tracks and built within the viaduct's concrete structure. Two staircases from each platform near their east end go down to a balcony (where mosaics reading "MEN" and "WOMEN" for two now-closed restrooms are visible) before three staircases go down to the turnstile bank. Outside fare control, there is a token booth and two sets of entry/exit doors, one to the west side of Fourth Avenue directly underneath the viaduct and the other to the north side of Tenth Street. Both entrances have their original lit-up IND "SUBWAY" sign while mosaic direction tiles reading "To Coney Island" and "To Manhattan" are in the mezzanine.

The fare control area has a single staircase going down to the extreme south end of the Bay Ridge-bound platform of Ninth Street on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. The extreme east (railroad south) ends of each platform have a single staircase going down to the entrance to the east side of Fourth Avenue underneath the viaduct at ground level. Another staircase from this eastern landing goes down to the Manhattan-bound platform of Ninth Street. The staircase and mezzanine areas have tile accents of green.

West of this station was a short stub-end reversing spur entered only from this station. It remained level between the two express tracks while the other tracks ramped up toward Smith–Ninth Streets. The track was removed during overhaul of the Culver Viaduct from 2007 to 2013.[18][19] East of this station, the line enters a tunnel toward Seventh Avenue.[16] That station is underground, but at a higher altitude than this elevated station due to the steep slope of the land (hence the neighborhood name of Park Slope).[8]


Gallery

BMT Fourth Avenue Line platforms

 9 Street
 "R" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
9th Street BMT Fourth Avenue 1293.JPG
Platform towards Manhattan
Station statistics
DivisionB (BMT)
LineBMT Fourth Avenue Line
Services      D late nights (late nights)
      N late nights (late nights)
      R all times (all times)
      W limited rush hour service only (limited rush hour service only)
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedJune 22, 1915; 104 years ago (1915-06-22)[3]
Station code029[1]
Wireless serviceWi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[20]
Station succession
Next northUnion Street: D late nightsN late nightsR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Next southProspect Avenue: D late nightsN late nightsR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Track layout

Ninth Street on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line is a local station that has four tracks and two side platforms.[16] White tiled curtain walls separate the express tracks from the local tracks.[21]

Both platforms have cinder-block tiles installed during a 1970s renovation that replaced the original mosaic trim line and name tablets. The original trim lines were replaced with white cinderblock tiles, except for small recesses in the walls, which contain yellow-painted cinderblock tiles. The staircases were repaired and new platform edges were installed. The yellow cinderblock field contains the station-name signs and black text pointing to the exits.[22] The renovation also replaced incandescent lighting with fluorescent lighting. Beige columns run along both platforms at either ends where they were extended in the 1960s to accommodate lengthened trains. The ceiling is lower in this section.[23]

Northeastern stairs next to the Church of the Holy Family

Each platform has one same-level fare control area in the middle. The one on the Manhattan-bound platform has a turnstile bank, token booth, and one staircase going up to the northeast corner of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue. This fare control area still has the station's original trim line with "9" tablets at regular intervals.[24] The fare control area on the Bay Ridge-bound platform is unstaffed, containing one High Entry/Exit Turnstile, one exit-only turnstile, a row of four low turnstiles, and a staircase to the northwest corner of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue.[25]

At the extreme south end of both platforms, staircases lead up to exit/entrance areas at street level. The exit/entrance area on the Manhattan-bound (eastern) side of the station was closed for around 40 years before being reopened in February 2012. On each side, staircases go up to either of the IND platforms at Fourth Avenue.

References

  1. ^ a b c "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  2. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2013–2018". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 18, 2019. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Through Tube to Coney, 48 Minutes: First Train on Fourth Avenue Route Beats West End Line Eleven Minutes". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 22, 1915. Retrieved June 29, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Independent Subway Services Beginning in 1932". thejoekorner.com. August 21, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  5. ^ "City Subway Extended". The New York Times. October 7, 1933. p. 16. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  6. ^ Linder, Bernard (August 1966). "Culver Shuttle". New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association.
  7. ^ McLaughlin, Mike (November 24, 2007). "Fix for Fourth Avenue station looks F'ing great". The Brooklyn Paper. Retrieved November 27, 2007.
  8. ^ a b "Culver Line Rehabilitation: Presentation to Community Board 6 Transportation Committee – November 15, 2007" (PDF). secondavenusagas.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 15, 2007. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 7, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2015.
  9. ^ "4th Avenue East Side Station House Reopens". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 23, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2012.
  10. ^ a b "Review of the G Line" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 10, 2013. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  11. ^ "Review of the G Line: Appendices" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 10, 2013. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  12. ^ "MTA NYC Transit - Service Advisory". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2009. Archived from the original on July 9, 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  13. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Red Hook" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Park Slope" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  15. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  16. ^ a b c Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  17. ^ Kramer, Frederick A. (January 1, 1990). Building the Independent Subway. Quadrant Press. ISBN 9780915276509.
  18. ^ Anastasio, Joseph (February 21, 2011). "Highest Lowpoint". LTV Squad. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  19. ^ King, Nicole. "Disused center trackway on viaduct". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  20. ^ "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  21. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (June 29, 2009). "Looking back down the Bensonhurst/Bay Ridge-bound side platform, with the white tiled wall between it and the express track at 9th Street". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  22. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (October 21, 2005). "A 9 Street platform sign on a portion of the platform wall that's painted with Exit next to an arrow beneath it directing passengers to the station's exit. This text beneath the station's signs don't acknowledge the transfer to the IND and the F train at all". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  23. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (October 21, 2005). "Looking down the ended portion of the platform at 9th Street, its extreme northern end where platform columns are and the ceiling is lower". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  24. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (June 29, 2009). "More relics of the original station from the 1910s, terra-cotta reliefs above doors, probably where public restrooms used to be, an old and off incandescent light fixture, and a visible portion of the station's original trim-line at 9th Street". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  25. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (November 1, 2012). "The gate is open, high entrance turnstile still on at the exit directly on the Bay Ridge-bound platform". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.

External links