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FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships

The FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships is the double-gender world championship for the sport of beach volleyball organized by the Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB) the sport's global governing body. The first official edition of the event was held in Los Angeles, United States in 1997 and tournaments had been awarded every two years since then. Before 1997, ten unofficial championships not organized by the FIVB were all held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil between 1987 and 1996. The most recent World Championships took place in Hamburg, Germany in 2019

Winning the World Championships is considered to be one of the highest honours in international beach volleyball, surpassing the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour and being surpassed only by the Beach Volleyball tournament at the Summer Olympic Games.

Format

The tournament has a 48-team main draw per gender and consists of two stages: the group stage followed by the knockout stage. The prize pool for each gender is US$500,000.[1]

Editions

The 1997 Beach Volleyball World Championships, were held from 10 to 13 September 1997, in Los Angeles, California (United States). It was the first official edition of this event, after 10 unofficial championships between 1987 and 1996.

Edition Year Host City Country Events
1 1997 Los Angeles  United States 2
2 1999 Marseille  France 2
3 2001 Klagenfurt  Austria 2
4 2003 Rio de Janeiro  Brazil 2
5 2005 Berlin  Germany 2
6 2007 Gstaad   Switzerland 2
7 2009 Stavanger  Norway 2
8 2011 Rome  Italy 2
9 2013 Stare Jabłonki  Poland 2
10 2015 Various  Netherlands 2
11 2017 Vienna  Austria 2
12 2019 Hamburg  Germany 2
12 2021 Rome  Italy 2

Results summary

Men's tournament

Year Host Gold medal match Bronze medal match Teams
Gold Medalists Score Silver Medalists Bronze Medalists Score 4th place
1997
Details
United States
Los Angeles
Brazil
Rogério Ferreira
and Guilherme Marques
2–1 United States
Canyon Ceman
and Mike Whitmarsh
United States
Dain Blanton
and Kent Steffes
Brazil
Paulão Moreira
and Paulo Emilio Silva
did not played, both pairs who lost at semi-finals were awarded a bronze medals 48
1999
Details
France
Marseille
Brazil
José Loiola
and Emanuel Rego
1–0 Switzerland
Martin Laciga
and Paul Laciga
Brazil
Rogério Ferreira
and Guilherme Marques
1–0 Spain
Javier Bosma
and Fabio Díez
48
2001
Details
Austria
Klagenfurt
Argentina
Mariano Baracetti
and Martín Conde
2–1 Brazil
José Loiola
and Ricardo Santos
Norway
Vegard Høidalen
and Jørre Kjemperud
2–0 United States
Rob Heidger
and Chip McCaw
48
2003
Details
Brazil
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
Emanuel Rego
and Ricardo Santos
2–0 United States
Dax Holdren
and Stein Metzger
Brazil
Márcio Araújo
and Benjamin Insfran
2–0 awarded
(walkover)
Portugal
João Brenha
and Miguel Maia
48
2005
Details
Germany
Berlin
Brazil
Márcio Araújo
and Fábio Luiz Magalhães
2–0 Switzerland
Sascha Heyer
and Paul Laciga
Germany
Julius Brink
and Kjell Schneider
2–1 Germany
Marvin Polte
and Thorsten Schön
48
2007
Details
Switzerland
Gstaad
United States
Phil Dalhausser
and Todd Rogers
2–0 Russia
Dmitri Barsuk
and Igor Kolodinsky
Australia
Andrew Schacht
and Joshua Slack
2–0 Brazil
Emanuel Rego
and Ricardo Santos
48
2009
Details
Norway
Stavanger
Germany
Julius Brink
and Jonas Reckermann
2–0 Brazil
Alison Cerutti
and Harley Marques Silva
United States
Phil Dalhausser
and Todd Rogers
2–0 Germany
David Klemperer
and Eric Koreng
48
2011
Details
Italy
Rome
Brazil
Alison Cerutti
and Emanuel Rego
2–0 Brazil
Márcio Araújo
and Ricardo Santos
Germany
Julius Brink
and Jonas Reckermann
2–1 Latvia
Mārtiņš Pļaviņš
and Jānis Šmēdiņš
48
2013
Details
Poland
Stare Jabłonki
Netherlands
Alexander Brouwer
and Robert Meeuwsen
2–0 Brazil
Álvaro Morais Filho
and Ricardo Santos
Germany
Jonathan Erdmann
and Kay Matysik
2–0 Brazil
Alison Cerutti
and Emanuel Rego
48
2015
Details
Netherlands
Netherlands
Brazil
Alison Cerutti
and Bruno Oscar Schmidt
2–1 Netherlands
Reinder Nummerdor
and Christiaan Varenhorst
Brazil
Evandro Oliveira
and Pedro Solberg Salgado
2–0 United States
Theo Brunner
and Nick Lucena
48
2017
Details
Austria
Vienna
Brazil
Evandro Oliveira
and André Stein
2–0 Austria
Clemens Doppler
and Alexander Horst
Russia
Viacheslav Krasilnikov
and Nikita Liamin
2–0 Netherlands
Maarten van Garderen
and Christiaan Varenhorst
48
2019
Details
Germany
Hamburg
Russia
Oleg Stoyanovskiy
and Viacheslav Krasilnikov
2–1 Germany
Julius Thole
and Clemens Wickler
Norway
Anders Mol
and Christian Sørum
2–1 United States
Tri Bourne
and Trevor Crabb
48
2021
Details
Italy
Rome
48

Women's tournament

Year Host Gold medal match Bronze medal match Teams
Gold Medalists Score Silver Medalists Bronze Medalists Score 4th place
1997
Details
United States
Los Angeles
Brazil
Sandra Pires
and Jackie Silva
2–1 United States
Lisa Arce
and Holly McPeak
Brazil
Shelda Bede
and Adriana Behar
United States
Karolyn Kirby
and Nancy Reno
did not played, both pairs who lost at semi-finals were awarded a bronze medals 48
1999
Details
France
Marseille
Brazil
Shelda Bede
and Adriana Behar
1–0 United States
Annett Davis
and Jenny Johnson Jordan
United States
Liz Masakayan
and Elaine Youngs
1–0 awarded
(walkover)
Brazil
Sandra Pires
and Adriana Samuel
48
2001
Details
Austria
Klagenfurt
Brazil
Shelda Bede
and Adriana Behar
2–0 Brazil
Tatiana Minello
and Sandra Pires
Czech Republic
Eva Celbová
and Soňa Nováková
2–0 United States
Barbra Fontana
and Elaine Youngs
48
2003
Details
Brazil
Rio de Janeiro
United States
Misty May
and Kerri Walsh
2–0 Brazil
Shelda Bede
and Adriana Behar
Australia
Natalie Cook
and Nicole Sanderson
2–0 United States
Annett Davis
and Jenny Johnson Jordan
48
2005
Details
Germany
Berlin
United States
Misty May-Treanor
and Kerri Walsh
2–0 Brazil
Larissa França
and Juliana Silva
China
Tian Jia
and Wang Fei
2–0 Cuba
Dalixia Fernández
and Tamara Larrea
48
2007
Details
Switzerland
Gstaad
United States
Misty May-Treanor
and Kerri Walsh
2–0 China
Tian Jia
and Wang Fei
Brazil
Larissa França
and Juliana Silva
2–1 China
Xue Chen
and Zhang Xi
48
2009
Details
Norway
Stavanger
United States
Jennifer Kessy
and April Ross
2–0 Brazil
Larissa França
and Juliana Silva
Brazil
Maria Elisa Antonelli
and Talita Antunes
2–0 Brazil
Shelda Bede
and Ana Paula Connelly
48
2011
Details
Italy
Rome
Brazil
Larissa França
and Juliana Silva
2–1 United States
Misty May-Treanor
and Kerri Walsh
China
Xue Chen
and Zhang Xi
2–0 Czech Republic
Lenka Háječková
and Hana Klapalová
48
2013
Details
Poland
Stare Jabłonki
China
Xue Chen
and Zhang Xi
2–1 Germany
Karla Borger
and Britta Büthe
Brazil
Liliane Maestrini
and Bárbara Seixas
2–0 United States
Whitney Pavlik
and April Ross
48
2015
Details
Netherlands
Netherlands
Brazil
Ágatha Bednarczuk
and Bárbara Seixas
2–1 Brazil
Fernanda Alves
and Taiana Lima
Brazil
Maria Elisa Antonelli
and Juliana Silva
2–1 Germany
Katrin Holtwick
and Ilka Semmler
48
2017
Details
Austria
Vienna
Germany
Laura Ludwig
and Kira Walkenhorst
2–1 United States
April Ross
and Lauren Fendrick
Brazil
Larissa França
and Talita Antunes
2–1 Canada
Sarah Pavan
and Melissa Humana-Paredes
48
2019
Details
Germany
Hamburg
Canada
Sarah Pavan
and Melissa Humana-Paredes
2–0 United States
Alix Klineman
and April Ross
Australia
Taliqua Clancy
and Mariafe Artacho del Solar
2–0 Switzerland
Nina Betschart
and Tanja Hüberli
48
2021
Details
Italy
Rome
48

Medal table

Total

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Brazil1291031
2 United States57416
3 Germany2237
4 China1124
5 Russia1113
6 Netherlands1102
7 Argentina1001
 Canada1001
9  Switzerland0202
10 Austria0101
11 Australia0033
12 Norway0022
13 Czech Republic0011
Totals (13 nations)24242674

Medal table, men

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Brazil74415
2 United States1225
3 Germany1135
4 Russia1113
5 Netherlands1102
6 Argentina1001
7  Switzerland0202
8 Austria0101
9 Norway0022
10 Australia0011
Totals (10 nations)12121337

Medal table, women

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Brazil55616
2 United States45211
3 China1124
4 Germany1102
5 Canada1001
6 Australia0022
7 Czech Republic0011
Totals (7 nations)12121337

See also

References

  1. ^ "FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships 2017—Hosting Requirements" (PDF). Fédération Internationale de Volleyball. Retrieved 22 March 2018.

Notes

External links