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Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020

Democratic Party presidential primaries, 2020
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4,763 delegate votes to the Democratic National Convention
2,382 delegate votes needed to win

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses will be a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the 4,051 delegates to the Democratic National Convention and determine the nominee for President of the United States in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. The elections will take place within all fifty U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. An extra 716 unpledged delegates (712 votes) or "superdelegates", including party leaders and elected officials, will be appointed by the party leadership independently of the primaries' electoral process. The convention will also approve the party's platform and vice-presidential nominee.

John Delaney, U.S. Representative from Maryland, formally announced his bid for the presidency on July 28, 2017 and became the first major candidate to enter the race.

Candidates

According to Newsweek magazine, several hundred people have already been mentioned as possible candidates for the Democratic nomination. However, the final number is sure to be far, far less.[1]

Declared major candidates

The candidates in this section have held public office or been included in a minimum of five independent national polls.

Candidate Most recent position Candidacy Total pledged delegates Contests won[a]
John Delaney 113th Congress official photo.jpg
John Delaney
July 28, 2017 U.S. Representative from Maryland
(2013–present)
John Delaney.png
(Campaign)
0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

Declared minor candidates

Candidate Most recent position Candidacy Total pledged delegates Contests won[a]
Jeff Boss.jpg
Jeff Boss
Conspiracy theorist
Perennial candidate
August 5, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

HB 2013 (cropped).jpg
Harry Braun
Democratic nominee for U.S. Representative from Arizona in 1984 and 1986
Candidate for President in 2004, 2012, and 2016
December 7, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%) N/A
Rocky De La Fuente1 (2) (cropped).jpg
Rocky De La Fuente
American Delta and Reform
nominee for President in 2016

Candidate for the U.S. Senate from California in 2018
Candidate for Mayor of New York City in 2017
Candidate for the U.S. Senate from Florida in 2016
January 9, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

FullC489D2008-01-01.jpg
Geoffrey Fieger
Democratic nominee for
Governor of Michigan in 1998
January 13, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

Robby Wells.PNG
Robby Wells
Former football coach for Savannah State University
Perennial candidate
May 4, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

Andrew Yang talking about urban entrepreneurship at Techonomy Conference 2015 in Detroit, MI (cropped).jpg
Andrew Yang
CEO of Venture for America
(2011–2017)
November 6, 2017 0 / 4051 (0%)

N/A

Individuals who have publicly expressed interest

Individuals in this section have expressed an interest in running for President within the last six months.

Potential candidates

Declined to be candidates

The individuals in this section have been the subject of speculation about their possible candidacy, but have publicly denied interest in running.

Endorsements

John Delaney
U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Representatives
Individuals
Andrew Yang
Individuals
Organizations

Potential convention sites

Bids for the National Convention were solicited in the fall of 2017, with finalists being announced early the following spring. The winning bid will be revealed in the summer of 2018.

Timeline

Background

After Hillary Clinton's failure to win the 2016 presidential election against Donald Trump, media speculation regarding potential candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination in the 2020 presidential election began to circulate.

2017

On July 28, 2017 John Delaney formally announced his bid for the presidency,[186] saying "The American people are far greater than the sum of our political parties. It is time for us to rise above our broken politics and renew the spirit that enabled us to achieve the seemingly impossible. This is why I am running for the Democratic nomination for president of the United States."

2018

As the cycle progresses, potential candidates will form exploratory committees and begin to organize and attend early "cattle call" forums.[187]

National polling

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Joe Biden Cory Booker Sherrod Brown Julian Castro Hillary Clinton Andrew Cuomo John Delaney Al Franken Kirsten Gillibrand Kamala Harris Michelle Obama Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Oprah Winfrey Others Undecided
Google Consumer Surveys[188] 482 May 10–19, 2018 - 24% - - - - - - - - - - 37% - - - 38%
Google Consumer Surveys[189] 519 May 10–19, 2018 - 20% 4% - - - - - - - 5% - 26% 9% - - 37%
Harvard CAPS/Harris Poll[190] 772 January 13–16, 2018 - 27% 4% - - 13% 2% - - 1% 4% - 16% 10% 13% 10% -
Civics Analytics[191] - - - 29% - - - - - - - - - - 27% - 17% - -
RABA Research[192] 345 January 10–11, 2018 ± 5.0% 26% - - - - - - - - - - 21% 18% 20% - 15%
Emerson College[193] 600 January 8–11, 2018 26.6% 3.1% 3.1% - 22.9% 8.6% - 9.3% 18.7%
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research Poll[194] 1000 January 6–11, 2018 - 26% 6% - - - - - - - - - 29% 14% 8% 12% -
Google Consumer Surveys[195] 309 December 20–22, 2017 - 22% 3% - - - - - - - 1% - 31% 11% - - 32%
Zogby Analytics[196] 682 October 2017 19% 2% 1% 1% - 22% 18% 8% - 10% 19%
Zogby Analytics[197][198] 356 September 2017 ± 5.2% 17% 3% 3% - 28% 12% - 15% 23%
Rasmussen[199] 1,000 February 8–9, 2017 ± 3% 15% 8% 17% 6% - 20% 16% - 0% 20%
Public Policy Polling[200] 400 December 6–7, 2016 ± 4.9% 31% 4% 2% 0% 2% 3% 3% - 24% 16% - 14%
  1. ^ a b According to popular vote or pledged delegate count (not counting superdelegates); see below for detail.

Statewide polling

Iowa

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Cory Booker Julian Castro Andrew Cuomo Kirsten Gillibrand Kamala Harris Amy Klobuchar Martin O'Malley Sheryl Sandberg Howard Schultz Others Undecided
Public Policy Polling[201]
(for an O'Malley-aligned PAC)
1,062 March 3–6, 2017 17% 4% 8% 3% 3% 11% 18% 4% 1% 32%

New Hampshire

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Cory Booker Joseph Kennedy III Martin O'Malley John Hickenlooper Mark Zuckerberg Kamala Harris Tim Ryan Amy Klobuchar Kirsten Gilibrand John Delaney Deval Patrick Terry McAuliffe Other Undecided
Suffolk University Political Research Center[202] 295 April 26-30, 2018 +/-3.5 13% 20% 26% 8% 4% 2% 4% 2% 21%
Granite State Poll[203]
188 April 13-22, 2018 +/-7.1 28% 26% 11% 5% 3% 2% 1% 6% 0% 1% 1% 2% 13%
Granite State Poll[204] 223 January 28–February 2, 2018 +/-6.6 24% 35% 15% 3% 1% 1% 0% 2% 0% 4% 15%
Google Consumer Surveys[205] 249 November 12–14, 2017 - 40% 21% - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 39%
Granite State Poll[206]
212 October 3–15, 2017 +/-6.7 31% 24% 13% 6% 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0% 5% 11%

California

Poll source Sample size Date(s) Margin of error Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren Cory Booker Joseph Kennedy III Martin O'Malley John Hickenlooper Mark Zuckerberg Kamala Harris Tim Ryan Amy Klobuchar Kirsten Gilibrand John Delaney Deval Patrick Terry McAuliffe Other Undecided
Google Consumer Surveys[207] 184 November 8–10, 2017 - 52% 24% - 5% - - - - 19% - - - - - - - -

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o This individual is not registered to the political party of this section, but has been the subject of speculation or expressed interest in running under this party.

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