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Church of St Thomas the Apostle, Lymington

Church of St Thomas the Apostle
Lymington Parish Church.jpg
50°45′27.2″N 1°32′42.6″W / 50.757556°N 1.545167°W / 50.757556; -1.545167
LocationLymington
CountryUnited Kingdom
DenominationChurch of England
History
Founded13th century
Architecture
Functional statusActive
Specifications
Bells8
Tenor bell weight20 long cwt 1 qr 3 lb (2,271 lb or 1,030 kg)
Administration
ParishSt Thomas & All Saints
DioceseWinchester
ProvinceCanterbury

The Church of St Thomas the Apostle in Lymington in Hampshire, is the main Anglican Church of England parish church for the town. The building dates to the reign of Henry VI (1421–1471[1] but was largely rebuilt in the 17th and 18th centuries.

History

The church was originally built as a Chapel of Christchurch Priory and has been expanded over the centuries. In 1953, the church was designated Grade II listed.

The bells

The tower, with its distinctive cupola, holds a peal of 8 bells, the Tenor (the biggest bell) weighs 20cwt-1qrs-3lbs and strikes the note Eb. Three of the bells date from 1901 and were cast by John Taylor & Co in Loughborough. The other five bells were cast by Robert II Wells in 1785.

References

  1. ^ A New Guide to Lymington, by a Resident. London: R. King. 1828. p. 32.

External links