This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

CECAFA Cup

CECAFA Cup
Founded1926
RegionCECAFA
Number of teams12
Current champions Kenya (7 titles)
Most successful team(s) Uganda (14 titles)
Websitewww.cecafafootball.org
2017 CECAFA Cup

The CECAFA Cup (now the CECAFA Tusker Challenge Cup), is the oldest football tournament in Africa. A FIFA competition, it includes national teams from the Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations (CECAFA).

Cup history

There is an anomaly on national teams in the case of Tanzania. It fields two teams, Tanzania and Zanzibar. In 2005 and 2006, the tournament was sponsored by the Ethiopian-Saudi businessman Sheikh Mohammed Al Amoudi, and was dubbed the Al Amoudi Senior Challenge Cup.[1] It is the successor competition of the Gossage Cup, held 37 times from 1926 until 1966, and the East and Central African Senior Challenge Cup, held 7 times between 1965 and 1971.

In August 2012, CECAFA signed a sponsorship deal worth US$450,000 with East African Breweries to have the cup renamed to the CECAFA Tusker Challenge Cup.[2]

Previous winners

Gossage Cup (1926–1966) and Challenge Cup (1967–1971)

The Gossage Cup was contested between Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika and Zanzibar. The first match was played between the Kenyan and Ugandan national teams in May 1926, with Kenya winning 2–1 in a replay.[3][4] Tanganyika participated since 1945 and Zanzibar since 1949. The tournament was sponsored by the soap manufacturer Gossage, owned by the British Lever Brothers. In 1967, the competition was renamed to the East and Central African Senior Challenge Cup.[5]

CECAFA Cup

With the formation of CECAFA in 1973, the tournament was renamed to the CECAFA Cup.

Key
* Match was won on a penalty shootout
Tournament not held or not officially recognised
List of CECAFA Cup winners
Year Host Final Third place play-off
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1973  Uganda  Uganda 2–1  Tanzania  Kenya Zambia[1]
1974  Tanzania  Tanzania 1–1*[A]  Uganda  Zambia Zanzibar[1]
1975  Zambia  Kenya 0–0*[B]  Malawi  Tanzania Uganda[1]
1976  Zanzibar  Uganda 2–0  Zambia  Kenya Malawi[1]
1977  Somalia  Uganda 0–0*[C]  Zambia  Malawi 2–1  Kenya
1978  Malawi  Malawi 3–2  Zambia  Kenya 2–0  Uganda
1979  Kenya  Malawi 3–2  Kenya  Tanzania 2–1  Zanzibar
1980  Sudan  Sudan 1–0  Tanzania  Malawi 1–0  Zambia
1981  Tanzania  Kenya 1–0  Tanzania  Zambia 1–0  Uganda
1982  Uganda  Kenya 1–1*[D]  Uganda  Zimbabwe 3–0  Zanzibar
1983  Kenya  Kenya 1–0  Zimbabwe  Uganda 1–0  Malawi
1984  Uganda  Zambia 0–0*[E]  Malawi  Uganda 3–1  Kenya
1985  Zimbabwe  Zimbabwe 2–0  Kenya  Malawi 3–1  Uganda
1986
Not held (initially Somalia but later withdrew)
1987  Ethiopia  Ethiopia 1–1*[F]  Malawi  Uganda 3–1  Kenya
1988  Malawi  Malawi 3–1  Zambia  Kenya 0–0*[G]  Zimbabwe
1989  Kenya  Uganda 3–3*[H]  Malawi  Kenya 1–0  Zambia
1990  Zanzibar  Uganda 2–0  Sudan  Tanzania 2–1  Zanzibar
1991  Uganda  Zambia 2–0  Kenya  Uganda 3–1  Sudan
1992  Tanzania  Uganda 1–0  Tanzania B  Zambia 4–0  Malawi
1993
Not held (Initially Uganda but later withdrew)
1994  Kenya  Tanzania 2–2*[I]  Uganda  Kenya 1–0  Eritrea
1995  Uganda  Zanzibar 1–0  Uganda B  Kenya 2–2*[J]  Ethiopia
1996  Sudan  Uganda 1–0  Sudan B  Sudan 1–1*[K]  Kenya
1997
Not held (CECAFA suspended)
1998
1999  Rwanda  Rwanda B 3–1  Kenya  Rwanda 0–0*[L]  Burundi
2000  Uganda  Uganda 2–0  Uganda B  Ethiopia 1–1*[M]  Rwanda
2001  Rwanda  Ethiopia 2–1  Kenya  Rwanda 1–0  Rwanda B
2002  Tanzania  Kenya 3–2  Tanzania  Rwanda 2–1  Uganda
2003  Sudan  Uganda 2–0  Rwanda  Kenya 2–1  Sudan
2004  Ethiopia  Ethiopia 3–0  Burundi  Sudan 2–1  Kenya
2005  Rwanda  Ethiopia 1–0  Rwanda  Zanzibar 0–0*[N]  Uganda
2006  Ethiopia  Sudan 0–0*[O]  Zambia  Rwanda 0–0*[P]  Uganda
2007  Tanzania  Sudan 2–2*[Q]  Rwanda  Uganda 2–0  Burundi
2008  Uganda  Uganda 1–0  Kenya  Tanzania 3–2  Burundi
2009  Kenya  Uganda 2–0  Rwanda  Zanzibar 1–0  Tanzania
2010  Tanzania  Tanzania 1–0  Côte d'Ivoire B  Uganda 4–3  Ethiopia
2011  Tanzania  Uganda 2–2*[R]  Rwanda  Sudan 1–0  Tanzania
2012  Uganda  Uganda 2–1  Kenya  Zanzibar 1–1*[S]  Tanzania
2013  Kenya  Kenya 2–0  Sudan  Zambia 1–1*[T]  Tanzania
2014
Not held (initially Ethiopia but later withdrew) §
2015  Ethiopia  Uganda 1–0  Rwanda  Ethiopia 1–1*[U]  Sudan
2016
Not held (initially Sudan, then Kenya but both later withdrew)
2017  Kenya  Kenya 2–2*[V]  Zanzibar  Uganda 2–1  Burundi
2018
Not held (initially Zanzibar, then Kenya but both later withdrew)[6]

§ The 2014 CECAFA Cup would have been the 38th edition of the Cup. It was scheduled to take place in Ethiopia from 24 November to 9 December,[7][8] but the nation withdrew from hosting the tournament in October due to "domestic and international engagements",[9] according to CECAFA secretary-general Nicholas Musonye. Musonye also announced that Sudan as one of the countries that could have replaced Ethiopia as the hosts of the tournament.[10] After none of the 12 member nations of CECAFA expressed an interest in hosting the tournament on short notice, it was announced on 27 November that CECAFA had cancelled the competition. Rwanda hosted the 2015 edition of the competition.[11]
The 2016 CECAFA Cup was to be the 39th edition of the annual CECAFA Cup. In September 2016, it was confirmed that Kenya would host the tournament.[12] Originally, it was slated to be hosted in Sudan.[13] In November 2016, Kenya announced they are not ready to host the tournament and CECAFA officials are looking to persuade Sudan to take over as hosts.[14] In December 2016, CECAFA announced the 2016 edition of the tournament will be canceled.[15]

Notes

  • 1 ^ – From 1973 to 1976 there was no third place play-off and both teams eliminated in the semi-finals were acknowledged as the third-placed team.

  • A ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Tanzania won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • B ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • C ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • D ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • E ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zambia won the shoot-out 3–0.
  • F ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • G ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 3-2.
  • H ^ – Score was 3–3 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 2–1.
  • I ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Tanzania won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • J ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • K ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Sudan won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • L ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Rwanda won the shoot-out 3–2.
  • M ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • N ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • O ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zambia won the shoot-out 11–10, but Sudan were given the title as Zambia were invited as guests.
  • P ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Rwanda won the shoot-out 4–2.
  • Q ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Sudan won the shoot-out 4–2.
  • R ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 3–2.
  • S ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 6–5.
  • T ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 6–5.
  • U ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • V ^ – Score was 2–2 after 120 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 3–2.

Statistics

Performance by nation

Team Years
 Burundi 1
2 2004
3
4 1999, 2007, 2008, 2017
 Ivory Coast 1
2 2010[b][i]
3
4
 Eritrea 1
2
3
4 1994
 Ethiopia 1 1987, 2001, 2004, 2005
2
3 2000, 2015
4 1995, 2010
 Kenya 1 1975, 1981, 1982, 1983, 2002, 2013, 2017
2 1979, 1985, 1991, 1999, 2001, 2008, 2012
3 1978, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 2003
4 1977, 1984, 1996, 2004
 Malawi[i] 1 1978, 1979, 1988
2 1975, 1984, 1989
3 1977, 1980, 1985
4 1983, 1992
 Rwanda 1 1999[b]
2 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2015
3 1999, 2001, 2002, 2006
4 2000, 2001[b]
 Sudan 1 1980, 2006, 2007
2 1990, 1996[b], 2013
3 1996, 2004, 2011
4 1991, 2003, 2015
 Tanzania 1 1974, 1994, 2010
2 1973, 1980, 1981, 1992[b], 2002
3 1979, 1990, 2008
4 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013
 Uganda 1 1973, 1976, 1977, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2015
2 1974, 1982, 1994, 1995[b], 2000
3 1983, 1984, 1987, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2017
4 1978, 1981, 1985, 2002, 2005, 2006
 Zambia[i] 1 1984, 1991
2 1976, 1977, 1978, 1988, 2006
3 1981, 1992, 2013
4 1980, 1989
 Zanzibar 1 1995
2 2017
3 2005, 2009, 2012
4 1979, 1982, 1987, 1990
 Zimbabwe[i] 1 1985
2 1983, 1987
3 1982
4 1988
  • b ^ - The nation's "B" team won the competition that year.
  • i ^ – Played as invited team.

By number of titles won and editions participated in

Team 1st 2nd 3rd 4th Pld Last
 Uganda 14 5 7 6 43 2017
 Kenya 7 7 6 4 36 2017
 Ethiopia 4 2 2 25 2017
 Tanzania 3 5 3 4 35 2017
 Malawi 3 3 3 2 21 2012
 Sudan 3 3 3 3 26 2015
 Zambia 2 5 3 2 21 2013
 Zimbabwe 1 2 1 1 11 2011
 Zanzibar 1 1 3 4 33 2017
 Rwanda B 1 2 2001
 Rwanda 6 4 2 23 2017
 Burundi 1 4 14 2017
 Côte d'Ivoire B 1 1 2010
 Eritrea 1 10 2012
 Djibouti 10 2011
 Kenya B 2 1994
 Libya 1 2017
 Seychelles 2 1994
 Somalia 30 2016
 South Sudan 4 2017
 Sudan B 1 1996
 Tanzania B 1 1992
 Uganda B 2 2000

See also

References

  1. ^ BBC News – Football – Africa BBC
  2. ^ Bonnie Mugabe (30 August 2012). "Challenge Cup brought forward". The New Times. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 1 September 2012.
  3. ^ Courtney, Barrie (8 June 2007). "Kenya International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 9 November 2010.
  4. ^ Courtney, Barrie (15 August 2006). "Uganda - List of International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 9 November 2010.
  5. ^ Aro Geraldes, Pablo. "CECAFA Senior Challenge history". RSSSF. Retrieved 19 November 2013.
  6. ^ "2018 Cecafa Cup cancelled because of lack of hosts". BBC Sport. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  7. ^ "CECAFA 2014: Cecafa has confirmed Ethiopia as the host the 2014 Senior Challenge Cup". CECAFA. Archived from the original on 2014-06-28. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  8. ^ Jackson Oryada (24 April 2014). "Ethiopia to host 2014 Cecafa Cup". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  9. ^ "Ethiopia withdraws from hosting CECAFA Challenge Cup 2014". Kawowo Sports. Kawowo Sports Media. Archived from the original on 2014-11-02. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  10. ^ "Ethiopia withdraws as Cecafa Challenge Cup hosts". Goal.com. 31 October 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  11. ^ "Rwanda: CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup Cancelled". The New Times. allAfrica.com. 27 November 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  12. ^ "Kenya step in to host Cecafa events". BBC Sport. 9 September 2016.
  13. ^ "Sudan named as 2016 Cecafa Cup hosts". BBC Sport. 5 January 2015. Retrieved 8 January 2015.
  14. ^ "CECAFA looking for Cup hosts after Kenya withdrawals". New Times Rwanda. 5 November 2016. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  15. ^ "Cecafa 2016 tournaments cancelled". BBC Sport. 9 December 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2016.

Sources

External links