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Beti language

Beti
Yaunde–Fang
Native toCameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon
Native speakers
(2.8 million cited 1982–2013)[1]
Dialects
Language codes
ISO 639-3btb (retired)[2][3]
Glottologyaun1239[4]

Beti is a group of Bantu languages, spoken by the Beti-Pahuin peoples who inhabit the rain forest regions of Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and São Tomé and Príncipe. The varieties, which are largely mutually intelligible and variously considered dialects or closely related languages, are:

Ewondo (Yaunde)
Fang
Bulu
Eton
Bebele
Bebil
Mengisa.

Beti had an ISO 639-3 code, but it was retired in 2010 because the varieties of Beti already had their own codes.[2][3]

There is a Beti-based pidgin called Ewondo Populaire.

References

  1. ^ Sum of figures in Ethnologue 18
  2. ^ a b "Change Request Documentation: 2009-032". SIL International.
  3. ^ a b McLaughlin, John E. (2009-06-12). "Change Request Number 2009-032" (PDF). SIL International. Beti is a group name, not an individual language name. Member languages are Bebele [beb], Bebil [bxp], Bulu [bum], Eton [eto], Ewondo [ewo], Fang [fan], and Mengisa [mct], all of which already have their own code elements.
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Yaunde–Fang (A.70)". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.