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Bayono–Awbono languages

Bayono–Awbono
Geographic
distribution
Papua Province, Indonesia
Linguistic classificationTrans–New Guinea
  • Central West New Guinea
Subdivisions
Glottologbayo1259[1]

Bayono–Awbono is a recently discovered Papuan language cluster spoken in Papua Province, Indonesia, to the south of the Somahai languages. All that is known of them is a few hundred words recorded in first-contact situations recorded in Wilbrink (2004) and Hischier (2006).

Languages

Wilbrink (2004) lists 4 distinct language varieties.[2][3]

Classification

Noting insufficient evidence, Pawley and Hammarström (2018) leave Bayono–Awbono as unclassified rather than as part of Trans-New Guinea.[4] Timothy Usher finds enough evidence to classify Awbono–Bayono within the Greater Awyu (Digul River) family.[5]

Wilbrink (2004) notes limited similarity with the neighboring Ok languages, and does not classify Bayono–Awbono with Ok.[2]

Pronouns

The pronouns demonstrate resemblances to the neighboring Ok and Greater Awyu languages, and the pronouns are consistent with Bayono-Awbono belonging to the Trans–New Guinea family:

Dialect 1sg 2sg
Awbono ɡu
Bayono ne ɡwe
proto-Awyu–Dumut *nu-p *gu-p
proto-Ok *na- *ka-b-/*ku-b-
proto-TNG *na *ga

References

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Bayono–Awbono". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  2. ^ a b Wilbrink, Ans (2004). The Kopkaka of Papua: Provisional notes on their language, its language affiliation and on the Kopkaka culture. MA thesis, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.
  3. ^ Wilbrink, Ans 2004 in Glottolog 4.1
  4. ^ Pawley, Andrew; Hammarström, Harald (2018). "The Trans New Guinea family". In Palmer, Bill (ed.). The Languages and Linguistics of the New Guinea Area: A Comprehensive Guide. The World of Linguistics. 4. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. pp. 21–196. ISBN 978-3-11-028642-7.
  5. ^ Usher, Timothy. North Digul River. New Guinea World.

External links

Further reading

  • Hischier, Phyllis (2006). Exploration of the Remote Kopayap and Urajin Areas in West Papua, Indonesia: A First Contact in Kopayap and Urajin. Manuscript.
  • Wilbrink, Ans (2004). The Kopkaka of Papua: Provisional notes on their language, its language affiliation and on the Kopkaka culture. MA thesis, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.