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American Ninja Warrior

American Ninja Warrior
American Ninja Warrior Logo.jpg
GenreSports entertainment
Sports competition
Based onSasuke
Directed by
  • Jay Hunter (2010–13)
  • Patrick McManus[1] (2014–)
Presented by
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons10
No. of episodes146[2]
Production
Executive producer(s)
Camera setupMultiple-camera
Running time36–128 minutes
Production company(s)
DistributorNBCUniversal Television Distribution
Release
Original network
  • G4 (2009–13)
  • NBC (2012–)
Picture formatHDTV (1080i)
Audio format5.1 Surround
Original releaseDecember 12, 2009 (2009-12-12) –
present
Chronology
Preceded byAmerican Ninja Challenge (2006–08)
Related showsSasuke
Ultimate Beastmaster
External links
Website
Production website

American Ninja Warrior (sometimes abbreviated as ANW) is an American sports entertainment competition, which is a spin-off of the Japanese television series Sasuke. It features hundreds of competitors attempting to complete series of obstacle courses of increasing difficulty in various cities across the United States, in hopes of advancing to the national finals on the Las Vegas Strip and becoming the season's "American Ninja Warrior."

To date, only two competitive rock-climbers, Isaac Caldiero and Geoff Britten, have finished the course and achieved "total victory." Caldiero is the only competitor to win the cash prize. The series premiered on December 12, 2009, on the defunct cable channel G4, and airs now on NBC with encore episodes showing on USA Network, NBCSN, and Esquire Network.

History

An American Ninja Challenge competitor in a Batman costume.

In late 2006, the American cable channel G4 began airing broadcasts (subtitled in English or dubbed with English commentary and re-titled Ninja Warrior) of the Japanese sports entertainment television special Sasuke.[8] To coincide with this, the channel held the first ever American Ninja Challenge, in which Americans gained the opportunity to be sent to compete on Sasuke. Over time, the semi-annual Sasuke broadcasts on G4 gained a cult following in the United States and eventually became some of the channel's most-watched broadcasts. This led to the creation of the American adaptation of the show, American Ninja Warrior, in 2009.[3][9] As a result, American Ninja Warrior succeeded American Ninja Challenge as the qualifying route for Americans to enter Sasuke.[6]

Since the fourth season, American finalists compete on a nearly-identical finals course on the Las Vegas Strip rather than traveling to Japan to compete on Sasuke.[10] NBC began broadcasting the city finals and national finals episodes in the fourth season.[6]

By the fifth season, G4 was set to be replaced by Esquire Network and had wound down all original programming—besides American Ninja Warrior—by January 2013. Notably, the sideboard advertising along the fifth season's courses listed Esquire Network as the broadcaster[11] because G4 was going to transition into Esquire Network by April 22, 2013—prior to the season premiere. However, the channel switch was delayed to September 23, 2013, and Esquire Network took over Style Network's channel space instead. As a result, NBC became the sole broadcaster of the original episodes while Esquire Network aired reruns until the eighth season.[12]

Series overview

Season Duration National Finals Presenters
Premiere Finale Prize money Venue Last Ninja Standing/
American Ninja Warriors
Result Host Co-host Sideline reporter
1 December 12, 2009 December 19, 2009 None Sasuke 23 Levi Meeuwenberg Fell on Stage 3 Blair Herter Alison Haislip None
2 December 8, 2010 December 23, 2010 $250,000 Sasuke 26 David Campbell Matt Iseman Jimmy Smith Alison Haislip
3 July 31, 2011 August 21, 2011 $500,000[a] Sasuke 27
4 May 20, 2012 July 23, 2012 $500,000 Mount Midoriyama
(Las Vegas Strip)
Brent Steffensen Jonny Moseley Angela Sun
5 June 30, 2013 September 16, 2013 Brian Arnold Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Jenn Brown
6 May 26, 2014 September 8, 2014 Joe Moravsky
7 May 25, 2015 September 14, 2015 $1,000,000 Geoff Britten / Isaac Caldiero Completed Stage 4[b] Kristine Leahy
8 June 1, 2016 September 12, 2016 Drew Drechsel Fell on Stage 3
9 June 12, 2017 September 18, 2017 Joe Moravsky
10 May 30, 2018 September 10, 2018 Drew Drechsel
11 May 29, 2019 TBA TBD TBD Zuri Hall
  Indicates competitor(s) completed Stage 4 and won the title of "American Ninja Warrior."

Presenters

The broadcast position for host Matt Iseman and co-host Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, seen here in the eighth season alongside a city course.

During each episode, the host and co-host provide play-by-play on a competitor's run on the course while the sideline reporter introduces the obstacles and interviews competitors.[14]

American Ninja Warrior was originally hosted by G4 television personality Blair Herter and television correspondent Alison Haislip.[15]

In the second season, comedian and television host Matt Iseman joined the show, replacing Herter. Producers were fond of his knowledge of sports and lighthearted, enthusiastic delivery.[6][16] Additionally, MMA fighter Jimmy Smith was brought in as co-host while Haislip was assigned to the new sideline reporter position.[6][17] The panel remained the same throughout season three.[18]

For season four, Olympic medalist Jonny Moseley was brought in as the new co-host, replacing Smith. Producers believed his experience as a freestyle skier would bring a unique perspective to the series. Meanwhile, sportscaster and television presenter Angela Sun replaced Haislip.[14]

For season five, two newcomers were introduced. Sports analyst and former NFL player Akbar Gbaja-Biamila replaced Moseley, while ESPN sportscaster and model Jenn Brown replaced Sun as sideline reporter.[19] Gbaja-Biamila was contacted to audition for the role of co-host in Los Angeles after being seen on the NFL Network by one of the series' executive producers.[20] The season five panel remained the same through the sixth season.

For season seven, CBS Sports reporter Kristine Leahy joined the show as the new sideline reporter, replacing Brown.[21]

Iseman and Gbaja-Biamila will return to host the eleventh season along with new sideline reporter Zuri Hall.[22]

Format

Contestant eligibility

Before being eligible to compete, all contestants must first meet a number of requirements. Some of the requirements are; (1). Contestants must be legal residents of the United States. (2).Contestants must be in decent physical shape. (3). There is no maximum age limit, but contestants must be at least 19 years of age (21 years old during the first nine seasons). (4). Contestants must fill out a 20-page questionnaire and make a video about themselves.[23] Video length requirements have varied from two to eight minutes, depending on the season.[24]

About 1,000 people applied to compete in the first season,[25] 3,500 in the fifth season,[26] 5,000 in the sixth season,[27] 50,000 in the seventh season,[25] 70,000 in the eighth season,[28] and 77,000 in the ninth season.[29] Producers then select 100 contestants from the thousands of applicants to participate in each regional qualifier. They also select 20 to 30 "walk-ons" who may wait weeks camping outside a course to compete on it.[25]

Some have noted that the program is a game show and not a traditional athletic competition. Four-time ANW contestant Travis Brewer said, "If you do well on the first night but not on the second, your results aren't averaged out. You don't move on," adding, "There's no point system. And they choose people who have a good story as much as ability."[30]

City qualifiers and finals

City qualifier and finals courses are filmed back-to-back, usually over two nights.[31]

City qualifiers

Indianapolis city qualifier entrance during the eighth season.

In each city qualifier course, the competitors that the producers have selected compete on an obstacle course consisting of six obstacles.

At the beginning of each run, a buzzer sounds off and a timer begins, allowing a competitor to start the course. The first obstacle on any city qualifying course is the quintuple steps or floating steps, which competitors must run across. This is followed by four different obstacles that test a competitor's balance, upper-body strength, and grip. These five obstacles are built above water. If a competitor falls into the water or touches it, their run ends immediately and the timer records their time.

Until the ninth season, the sixth and final obstacle was the 14'6" warped wall, in which competitors were given three chances to reach the top. In the tenth season, the 18-foot "Mega Wall" was introduced adjacent to the warped wall. Competitors have only one attempt to reach the top of the Mega Wall and, if successful, they win $10,000. If unsuccessful, the competitor only gets one attempt at the warped wall. Competitors are given the choice of which to climb.

At the top of both walls, a competitor presses a buzzer that stops the timer and records their time, ending their run on the course. The top 30 competitors who go the farthest in the least amount of time advance to the city finals course. Since the ninth season, the top five women also advance to the city finals, regardless of whether they finished in the top 30.[32]

City finals

City finals courses are the follow-up to each city qualifying course. They contain four new obstacles in addition to the six obstacles featured in the city qualifying course. These four obstacles are all placed after the original six obstacles. As of the tenth season, two of the original six obstacles are replaced with new obstacles for the city finals course.

The top 15 competitors who go the farthest in the least amount of time from each city finals course move on to compete on the National Finals course. As of the ninth season, the top two women in each city finals course also move on to compete on the National Finals course, even if they do not finish in the top 15. Previously, many women had been granted "wildcard" slots, which allowed them to advance to the National Finals.[32] Since the eighth season, small prizes ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 are awarded to first, second, and third finishers who complete the city finals course.[33]

In the first three seasons, there was a semi-finals course in between the city finals and the National Finals courses, where the top 15 competitors from the city finals course were narrowed down to 10 and then sent to Japan to compete on Sasuke.[15] In the second and third seasons, this was referred to as "boot camp" and took place at a summer camp in Simi Valley, California.[6][34] During this time, competitors trained together for multiple days and took part in pressure challenges.[17][18] With the expansion of the series in its fourth season, there was no longer a need to narrow down competitors to 10, as they were no longer being sent to Japan, and this semi-finals course was removed.[5]

The final obstacle of all city courses, the Warped Wall, seen here in Indianapolis when the course was curved around Monument Circle.

City timeline

Location Season
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Greater Los Angeles, CA
Venice
San Pedro
Universal City
Miami, FL
Dallas, TX
Denver, CO
Baltimore, MD
St. Louis, MO
Kansas City, MO
Houston, TX
Orlando, FL
Pittsburgh, PA
Atlanta, GA
Indianapolis, IN
Oklahoma City, OK
Philadelphia, PA
San Antonio, TX
Daytona Beach, FL
Cleveland, OH
Minneapolis, MN
Tacoma, WA
Cincinnati, OH

Obstacles

Obstacles are designed and produced in the five months prior to an episode taping. In the fourth season, each location contained one or two obstacles that differed between other locations. Since the fifth season, three to five obstacles have differed. In the eighth season, 18 obstacles were debuted.[31][35] In the tenth season, the show's first underwater obstacle was introduced during Stage 2 of the National Finals.[36]

Beginning with the ninth season, fans of the show have been given the opportunity to design their own obstacles through the ANW Obstacle Design Challenge. Seven fan-submitted obstacles have been featured on the series thus far.

National Finals

In the first three seasons, the top 10 ANW competitors advanced to a Sasuke finals course in Japan. Since season four, ANW has had a finals course on the Las Vegas Strip known as "Mount Midoriyama." The National Finals course consists of four stages, each containing obstacles of increasing difficulty. The course is about the same size as four football fields[35] and contains 23 obstacles.

Stage 1 consists of eight obstacles, which test the competitors' agility and speed. The first stage is timed, and only the competitors who successfully complete it within two minutes and 35 seconds advance to Stage 2. Stage 2 contains six obstacles that test competitors' strength and speed. Competitors must complete the course within a time limit in order to advance to Stage 3. The time limit from the first through ninth seasons was four minutes.[37] In the tenth season, the time limit was increased by 30 seconds.[36] Stage 3 consists of eight obstacles that test competitors' upper body and grip strength.[36] It is the only stage in the National Finals that has no time limit. Like Stages 1 and 2, only the competitors who successfully complete Stage 3 move on to compete on Stage 4.

Stage 4 contains the final obstacle of the National Finals courses—a rope climb. Competitors must complete this rope climb in 30 seconds or less in order to be crowned as "American Ninja Warrior." The rope climb's height was 50 feet from the first through third seasons,[38] and was increased to 65 feet in the fourth season.[39] It has been increased since to 75 feet.[13]

Prize money

Aside from the first season, if a competitor completes all four stages of the National Finals, he or she receives a cash prize. In the second season, the prize money was $250,000.[4] In the third season, the prize was an endorsement deal with K-Swiss worth $500,000 and to become the face of a national advertisement campaign for the company as well as G4.[18] In the fourth, fifth, and sixth seasons, the cash prize was $500,000.[6] Since the seventh season, the cash prize has been $1,000,000.[12]

From the second through seventh seasons, the fastest competitor would receive the full prize money, regardless of whether other competitors completed Stage 4 as well. Beginning with the eighth season, if multiple competitors completed Stage 4, the competitors split the prize money.[33] Since the tenth season, the "Last Ninja Standing," the competitor who would go the farthest in the least amount of time in the National Finals, if no other competitor completed Stage 4 first, would win $100,000.[36]

Season synopses

2009–2011

The first season of American Ninja Warrior began production in July 2009.[3] The season premiered on December 12, 2009, on G4, and concluded on December 19, 2009. It consisted of eight half-hour episodes. The qualifying round took place on the beach in Venice, Los Angeles, where a tryout was opened, meaning, competitors from across the United States had to fly themselves there to compete.[15] Levi Meeuwenberg was the Last Ninja Standing, having gone the farthest in the least amount of time among the American competitors on Sasuke 23.[6]

The second season premiered on December 8, 2010, on G4, and concluded on December 23, 2010, after 10 hour-long episodes.[2] Qualifiers were held in Venice, Los Angeles in August.[4] Out of the 10 competitors sent to Japan to compete on Sasuke 26, five completed Stage 1, four completed Stage 2, while none completed Stage 3.[34] David Campbell was the Last Ninja Standing, having been the American gone the farthest in the least amount of time on Stage 3.[6]

The third season had the same format as the second season but aired in the summer. Qualifiers were held in Venice, Los Angeles in May.[40] It premiered on July 31, 2011, on G4, and concluded on August 21, 2011.[2] The finale was aired again on August 22, 2011, as a two-hour primetime special on NBC.[34] In addition to the 10 Americans sent to compete on Sasuke, one fan of ANW got the chance to compete as well. This was the result of an eBay auction in which proceeds were sent to the American Red Cross to help with recovery efforts following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan.[14] During Sasuke 27, four of the six competitors who reached Stage 3 were American—a new record. Previously, only one American would reach Stage 3 per Sasuke competition.[9][41] David Campbell was again the Last Ninja Standing, having gone the farthest tin the least amount of time among the American competitors on Stage 3.[6]

2012–2014

Filming at the entrance of the Venice, Los Angeles course during the fourth season.

The fourth season was notable for differentiating American Ninja Warrior from Sasuke and began what is known as "the modern era" of the series.[6] Following the ratings success of the third season's NBC primetime special, the fourth season aired on both G4 and NBC.[6][41] It premiered on May 20, 2012, on G4, and concluded on July 23, 2012, on NBC. City qualifier courses and the first half of the National Finals were aired on G4, while the city finals courses and the second half of the National Finals aired on NBC.[14][42] With an increased production budget,[6] preliminary rounds were held in three different locations across the United States. In addition to Venice, Los Angeles, six regional qualifier competitions (Northeast, Northwest, Midwest, Midsouth, Southeast, and Southwest) took place in Dallas and Miami.[41] During the National Finals, which were held for the first time in the United States,[6][14] Brent Steffensen was the only competitor to reach Stage 3 and became the Last Ninja Standing.[6] He went further on Stage 3 than any American had ever gone before—including on Sasuke.[35]

The fifth season premiered on June 30, 2013, on G4, and concluded on September 16, 2013, on NBC. City qualifiers and finals courses aired on both G4 and NBC.[42] Regional competitions were held in four different locations: Venice, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Miami, and Denver.[43] In the Los Angeles qualifier, Jessie Graff became the first woman to qualify for a city finals course.[32] During the National Finals, 41-year-old Joyce Shahboz became the first woman to compete there twice in two years (as a wild card),[26] while Brian Arnold fell on the final obstacle of Stage 3 and won the title of Last Ninja Standing.[12]

The sixth season premiered on May 26, 2014, and concluded on September 8, 2014, with original episodes airing solely on NBC. Regional competitions were held in Venice, Los Angeles, Dallas, St. Louis, Miami, and Denver.[42] In the Dallas qualifier, Kacy Catanzaro became the first female competitor to make it up the Warped Wall. Later in the Dallas finals, she became the first woman to complete a city finals course. Catanzaro's two runs have been described as the first "viral moment" of the show and are credited with increasing the seventh season's submissions ten times over.[12][44] During the National Finals, Joe Moravsky fell on the antepenultimate obstacle of Stage 3[45] and became the sixth season's Last Ninja Standing.[12]

2015–2017

The seventh season premiered on May 25, 2015, and ended on September 14, 2015.[42] Regional competitions were held in six different locations, including two in Los Angeles. In addition to the Venice course, a special military-only course was built in San Pedro. Regional competitions were also held in Kansas City, Houston, Orlando, and Pittsburgh.[46][47] During Stage 3 of the National Finals, two competitors, Isaac Caldiero and Geoff Britten, completed the course and advanced to Stage 4, marking the first time any competitor(s) completed Stage 3.[12] During Stage 4, Britten completed the rope climb in 29.65 seconds out of a maximum of 30 seconds while Caldiero completed the rope climb in 26.14 seconds out of a maximum of 30 seconds. As Caldiero completed Stage 4 faster than Britten, he was awarded the full prize money and Britten received nothing,[13] though Britten became the first competitor to complete all six courses (city qualifier, city finals, and four stages of the National Finals) in a single season.[48]

The Fly Wheels, the third obstacle on the Indianapolis city course in the eighth season.

The eighth season of the series began on June 1, 2016, and concluded on September 12, 2016.[42] The eighth season marked a 40 percent increase in the number of female submission videos from the previous season. Regional competitions were held in Venice, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Indianapolis, Oklahoma City, and Philadelphia. During the Philadelphia finals, no competitor completed the course—a first in the series' history. In Stage 1 of the National Finals, many "veterans" of the show, including Geoff Britten, did not complete the course. As a result, only 17 competitors advanced to Stage 2—the lowest in the series' history. However, Jessie Graff became the first woman to complete Stage 1, placing fifth.[49][50] On Stage 3, Drew Drechsel fell during his run and became the Last Ninja Standing.[32]

The ninth season premiered on June 12, 2017, and ended on September 18, 2017. Qualifiers were held in Universal City, Denver, Kansas City, San Antonio, Daytona Beach, and Cleveland.[42] A record of 41 competitors successfully completed Stage 1 during the National Finals, including Allyssa Beird, who became just the second woman to complete it.[49] Stage 2 saw every competitor eliminated less Joe Moravsky, Sean Bryan, and Najee Richardson. However, none would go on to complete Stage 3. Bryan and Richardson fell on the Ultimate Cliffhanger, while Moravsky fell on the penultimate obstacle and became the Last Ninja Standing.[32][37]

2018–present

The tenth season began airing on May 30, 2018, and ended on September 10, 2018. City qualifier and finals competitions were held in Universal City, Dallas, Miami, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis.[42] Drew Drechsel and Sean Bryan—the two competitors to reach Stage 3 of the National Finals—both fell during their runs. However, Drechsel fell at a faster time than Bryan, crowning him the Last Ninja Standing. As the result of a format change introduced this season, Drechsel was also the first Last Ninja Standing to win $100,000 for being the competitor who went the farthest in the least amount of time on the National Finals course but did not complete Stage 4.[36][51]

The eleventh season will premiere on May 29, 2019.[52] City qualifier and finals competitions are to be held in Universal City, Atlanta, Oklahoma City, Baltimore, Cincinnati, and Tacoma, marking the first time that a course will be held in the Pacific Northwest. Meanwhile, the National Finals will return to Las Vegas for the eighth year. New rules regarding the Mega Wall obstacle, which was introduced in the previous season, are set to come into effect as well.[7]

Special episodes

USA vs. The World

Special Air date Champions Runner-up 3rd Place 4th Place Hosts Sideline reporter
1 USA vs. Japan January 13, 2014 Team USA Team Japan N/A N/A Matt Iseman Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Jenn Brown
2 USA vs. The World September 15, 2014 Team Europe Team USA Team Japan N/A
3 January 31, 2016 Team USA Team Europe Team Japan N/A Kristine Leahy
4 June 4, 2017 Team USA Team Europe Team Latin America N/A
5 March 11, 2018 Team Europe Team USA Team Latin America Team Asia
6 January 27, 2019 Team USA Team Australia Team Europe N/A

NBC has aired a series of six specials in which ANW fan favorites compete in a team against teams of competitors from regions across the world, including Japan, Europe, Latin America, and most recently, Asia. The competitors race on the same course used in the ANW finals.

All of the specials have been hosted by Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila. The first two included sideline reporter Jenn Brown. Since the 2016 special, Kristine Leahy has sideline reported.

The first special was called USA vs. Japan, while the rest were named USA vs. The World. The inaugural competition was aired on January 13, 2014, and was won by Team USA. The second special aired on September 15, 2014, and was won by Team Europe. The third special aired on January 31, 2016, and was won by Team USA. The fourth international competition was aired on June 4, 2017, and was again won by Team USA. The next special aired on March 11, 2018, and was won by Team Europe.

The sixth competition aired on January 27, 2019. It featured competitors from the United States, Europe, and for the first time, Australia. For the first time, each team had at least one female competitor.

All-Stars

2016

On May 29, 2016, prior to the premiere of season eight, NBC aired a two-hour all-star special in which hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams composed of three veterans, one rookie, and one woman. Teams competed on stages two, three, and four of the regular season finals course, Mt. Midoriyama, as well as competitions on a supersized course that tested their skills in competitions on the giant pegboard, 40-foot Salmon Ladder, Flying Shelf Grab, and Jump Hang, concluding with a race to the top of the "Mega" Warped Wall.

The all-star winners were Team Akbar, who won the team competition by beating Team Matt 5-3. Joe Moravsky completed Stage 2 in a record time of 1:08:52.

2017

On February 20, 2017, NBC aired a second two-hour all-star special. Like the previous year's competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila chose their own all-star teams, this year composed of one veteran, one breakout star, and one woman. Team Matt featured Chris Wilczewski, Najee Richardson, and Jesse "Flex" Lebreck. Team Akbar featured Grant McCartney, Neil "Crazy" Craver, and Meagan Martin. Sideline interviewer Kristine Leahy picked her team, which consisted of Jessie Graff, Flip Rodriguez, and Nicholas Coolridge. Teams competed in a relay race to finish sections of stages one, two, and three of the regular season finals course, Mt. Midoriyama. Next came the skills competition on a supersized course, where contestants tested their skills in competition on the 75-feet tall Endless Invisible Ladder, the 4-story high Super Salmon Ladder, Supersonic Shelf Grab, Striding Steps, and the Mega Wall, now 20 feet high.

The all-star winners were Team Kristine, who won the team relay race competition, beating Team Matt and last year's champions Team Akbar. Their highlight of the night was completing Stage 3 in a record time of 5:30:62, making this the POM Wonderful Run of the Night.

2018

On May 17, 2018, NBC aired a third two-hour all-star special. Like the last two seasons' competition, ANW hosts Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila, along with Kristine Leahy, chose their all-star teams composed of two male veterans and one female veteran. The reigning champs, Team Kristine (gray/pink), featured: Jessie Graff, Flip Rodriguez, and J. J. Woods. Team Matt (blue) featured: Jamie Rahn, Lance Pekus, and Jesse LaBreck. Team Akbar featured first-time all-stars: Allyssa Beird, Jon Alexis Jr., and Tyler Yamauchi.

For the first half of the special, the athletes competed individually, earning "skills medals". First was the "Skills Competition", which consisted of climbing the Super Salmon Ladder, 4 stories high and 35 rungs in the fastest time. Sean Bryan was the winner with a time of 19.39. The second skill medal was the Wicked Wingnuts obstacle. Drew Drechsel was the winner with a distance of 20 feet. Third, Upper body strength was tested on the Thunderbolt won by Jamie Rahn. Fourth, a speed and balance challenge on the Striding Steps was won by Jake Murray with a time of 28.76. Finally, in a new obstacle, the Mega Spider Climb, eight women all-stars raced side-by-side 80 feet up to the top of the Stage 4 tower. The competition was won by Jessie Graff in a time of 24:03, for the POM Wonderful Run of the Night.

The second half showcased the team competition: Stage 1 featured a relay race through the obstacles course. The first racer goes through Snake Run, Propeller Bar, and Double Dipper. The next racer tackles the Jumping Spider, Parkour Run, and the Warped Wall. The anchor runs through the Domino Pipes and the Flying Squirrel. The remaining two teams compete on Stage 2 for the other spot in the finals. Team Kristine won Stage 1 and a bye to Stage 3. Stage 2 featured the Giant Ring Swing, Criss Cross Salmon Ladder, Wave Runner, Swing Surfer, Wingnut Alley and the Wall Flip. Team Matt won and moved to Stage 3, which featured Floating Boards, Key Lock Hang, the Nail Clipper, Ultimate Cliffhanger, the Body Prop, Peg Cloud, the Time Bomb and the Floating Bar.

Team Kristine won the overall competition and the team relay race with a time of 6:12.06, beating Team Matt by only 5 seconds (6:17.96).

Celebrity Ninja Warrior

Celebrity Ninja Warrior is a special episode of ANW where celebrities compete on a modified American Ninja Warrior course and are coached by ANW competitors. The special aired as part of Red Nose Day, with money raised during the event donated to Comic Relief USA. Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila hosted both editions alongside ANW sideline reporter Kristine Leahy.

The first special aired on May 25, 2017. Nine celebrities competed. For every obstacle the celebrities completed, M&M's and The Rockefeller Foundation pledged to donate $5,000.[citation needed]

The second special aired on May 24, 2018. Each obstacle a celebrity completed raised $5,000 for Red Nose Day; earning up to $30,000 for finishing the whole course. A total of $185,000 was raised, courtesy of Comcast.

2017[53]
Celebrity Coach
Stephen Amell Kacy Catanzaro
Derek Hough Daniel Gil
Erika Christensen David "Flip" Rodriguez
Natalie Morales Grant McCartney
Nikki Glaser Jessie Graff
Jeff Dye Meagan Martin
Mena Suvari Natalie Duran
Nick Swisher Drew Dreschel
Ashton Eaton Kevin Bull
2018[54]
Celebrity Coach
Akbar Gbaja-Biamila Kevin Bull
Ne-Yo Drew Dreschel
Colton Dunn Natalie Duran
Derek Hough Meagan Martin
Nikki Bella Grant McCartney
Scott Evans Flip Rodriguez
Nastia Liukin Barclay Stockett
Gregg Sulkin Maggie Thorne

Reception

Awards and nominations

American Ninja Warrior awards and nominations
Awards Won Nominated
Creative Arts Emmy Awards
0 2
Directors Guild of America Awards
0 1
Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards
0 2
People's Choice Awards
0 2
Primetime Emmy Awards
0 3
Producers Guild of America Awards
0 2
Totals
Awards won 0
Nominations 12

Creative Arts Emmy Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2018 Outstanding Directing for a Reality Program Patrick McManus "Daytona Beach Qualifiers" Nominated [55]
Outstanding Picture Editing for a Structured or Competition Reality Program Editing Team[c] Nominated

Directors Guild of America Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2019 Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Reality Programs Patrick McManus "Miami City Qualifiers" Nominated [56]

Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2015 Favorite Reality Show American Ninja Warrior Season 6 Nominated [57]
2017 Season 8 Nominated [58]

People's Choice Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2016 Favorite Competition TV Show American Ninja Warrior Season 7 Nominated [59]
2017 Season 8 Nominated [60]

Primetime Emmy Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2016 Outstanding Reality-Competition Program American Ninja Warrior Season 7 Nominated [55]
2017 Season 8 Nominated
2018 Season 9 Nominated

Producers Guild of America Awards

Awarded Category Nominee Episode(s) Result Ref.
2017 Outstanding Producer of Competition Television Production Team[d] Season 7, 8 Nominated [61]
2018 Production Team[e] Season 9 Nominated [62]

Ratings

Season Time slot (ET) Episodes Premiered Ended Channel/
Network
TV season Season averages (NBC)
(Live + SD)
Most watched episode
(millions)
Date Premiere viewers
(millions)
Date Finale viewers
(millions)
Viewers (millions) 18–49 rating
1 Saturday 6:00 pm 8 December 12, 2009 N/A December 19, 2009 N/A G4 2009–10 N/A N/A N/A
2 Wednesday 8:00 pm 10 December 8, 2010 N/A December 23, 2010 N/A 2010–11 N/A N/A N/A
3 Sunday 9:00 pm 10 July 31, 2011 0.38[63] August 21, 2011 0.25[64] 2011 N/A N/A 0.38[63]
4 Monday 9:00 pm 24 May 20, 2012 0.34[65] July 23, 2012 4.87[66] G4
NBC
2012 5.46[66] 2.0[66] 6.78[66]
5 Monday 8:00 pm 21 June 30, 2013 5.04[67] September 16, 2013 4.04[67] 2013 5.15[67] 1.6[67] 5.81[67]
6 Monday 9:00 pm 14 May 26, 2014 4.65[68] September 8, 2014 5.21[68] NBC 2014 5.33[68] 1.8[68] 5.83[68]
7 Monday 8:00 pm 16 May 25, 2015 5.87[69] September 14, 2015 6.17[69] 2015 6.54[69] 1.9[69] 7.32[69]
8 13 June 1, 2016 6.35[70] September 12, 2016 5.88[70] 2016 6.28[70] 1.8[70] 7.01[70]
9 15 June 12, 2017 5.36[71] September 18, 2017 5.96[71] 2017 5.86[71] 1.4[71] 6.47[71]
10 15 May 30, 2018 5.35[72] September 10, 2018 5.69[72] 2018 5.08[72] 1.1[72] 5.86[72]
11 TBA May 29, 2019 TBA TBA TBA 2019 TBA TBA TBA

International broadcasts

In Australia and New Zealand, the show is broadcast on SBS2 (2013–2017), 9Go! (2018)[73], TV3 and Four. On April 25, 2016, it was announced that Canadian broadcaster CTV picked up American Ninja Warrior for its 2016 summer broadcast schedule [74]. In the United Kingdom and Ireland, the show is broadcast on Challenge[75]. In Israel, the show is broadcast on Yes Action and Keshet 12[76]. In 2016, Croatian RTL[77] started broadcasting the show. The show is also shown in Finland on Sub-TV. In the Netherlands the show was first broadcast in 2017 on SBS 6, where their own Ninja Warrior NL has been broadcast[78].

Syndication

The show is in syndication markets throughout the US and airs on local broadcast channels. As of August 18, 2018, the syndicated episodes are airing on MTV2 on Saturdays.

Spin-offs

Ninja vs. Ninja

On October 9, 2015, Esquire Network announced a spin-off of American Ninja Warrior, which would feature 24 three-person teams (two men and one women) of popular ANW alumni, initially titled Team Ninja Warrior. The teams compete head-to-head against each other, running the course simultaneously, thus creating a new live duel dynamic (including crossing points, where the two competitors can affect the other's progress.) The two teams with the fastest times advance to the finale, where one team will be crowned the winner and receive a cash prize. Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila host alongside actor and journalist, Alex Curry. The series is Esquire Network's most-watched program in the channel's history.

On May 31, 2016, Esquire Network ordered a sixteen-episode second season that also included a five-episode special college edition that had college-aged competitors go head-to-head against rival schools. On March 6, 2017, it was announced that Team Ninja Warrior will be moving to sibling cable channel USA Network as Esquire Network winds down its linear channel operations and relaunches as an online only service. The show's second season premiered proper on April 18. Ahead of its third season, the show was also re-titled American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja.

American Ninja Warrior Junior

On May 2, 2018, the second spin-off of American Ninja Warrior—entitled American Ninja Warrior Junior— was announced. Set to premiere on Universal Kids on October 13, 2018, Matt Iseman and Akbar Gbaja-Biamila will reprise their roles from ANW as hosts, with Olympic 2016 gold medalist Laurie Hernandez joining as co-host, guiding competitors in head-to-head challenges. The series will feature 200 kids ages 9–14 competing along a course of miniature, kid-friendly ANW obstacles such as the warped wall. Similar to ANW, males and females will run along the same course, and similarly to Ninja vs. Ninja and College Madness, competitors compete head-to-head. However, they will be divided into three age groups: 9–10, 11–12 and 13–14, with each category coached by fan-favorite athletes: Drew Dreschel, Kevin Bull, Natalie Duran, Meagan Martin, Najee Richardson, and Barclay Stockett.

Video game

A video game based on the series, American Ninja Warrior Challenge, was released on multiple consoles on March 19, 2019. The game includes online multiplayer, career mode, course and character customization, and all of the elements taken from the show with in-game commentary by Iseman and Gbaja-Biamila.[79]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The prize was an endorsement deal with K-Swiss worth $500,000.
  2. ^ Geoff Britten completed Stage 4 in 29.65 seconds out of a maximum of 30 seconds while Isaac Caldiero completed Stage 4 in 26.14 seconds out of a maximum 30 seconds. As Caldiero completed Stage 4 faster than Britten, he was awarded the full prize money and Britten received nothing.[13]
  3. ^ 2018 Creative Arts Emmy Awards nominees for "Outstanding Picture Editing for a Structured or Competition Reality Program": Nick Gagnon, David Greene, Michael Kalbron, Corey Ziemniak, Curtis Pierce, Kyle Barr, Mary Dechambres, Matthew Probst, Scott Simmons, Martin Singer, Katherine Griffin, Flavyn Mendoza.
  4. ^ 28th Producers Guild of America Awards nominees for "Outstanding Producer of Competition Television": Arthur Smith, Kent Weed, Anthony Storm, Brian Richardson, Kristen Stabile, David Markus, J.D. Pruess, D. Max Poris, Zayna Abi-Hashim, Royce Toni, John Gunn, Matt Silverberg, Briana Vowels, Mason Funk, Jonathan Provost.
  5. ^ 29th Producers Guild of America Awards nominees for "Outstanding Producer of Competition Television": Arthur Smith, Kent Weed, Anthony Storm, Brian Richardson, Kristen Stabile, David Markus, Royce Toni, Stephen Saylor, J.D. Pruess, Jeffrey J. Hyman, D. Max Poris, Briana Vowels, and Jonathan Provost.

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External links