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81 Terpsichore

81 Terpsichore
Discovery
Discovered byErnst Wilhelm Tempel
Discovery dateSeptember 30, 1864
Designations
MPC designation(81) Terpsichore
Pronunciation/tərpˈsɪkər/
tərp-SIK-ə-ree
Named after
Terpsichore
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion516.955 Gm (3.456 AU)
Perihelion337.132 Gm (2.254 AU)
427.044 Gm (2.855 AU)
Eccentricity0.211
1761.647 d (4.82 a)
17.43 km/s
149.581°
Inclination7.809°
1.497°
50.234°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions121.77 ± 2.34 km[1]
Mass(6.19 ± 5.31) × 1018 kg[1]
Mean density
6.54 ± 5.62 g/cm3[1]
10.943 hr
0.051 [2]
C
8.48

Terpsichore (/tərpˈsɪkər/ tərp-SIK-ə-ree; minor planet designation: 81 Terpsichore) is a large and very dark main-belt asteroid. It has most probably a very primitive carbonaceous composition. It was found by the prolific comet discoverer Ernst Tempel on September 30, 1864.[3] It is named after Terpsichore, the Muse of dance in Greek mythology.

Photometric observations of the minor planet in 2011 gave a rotation period of 10.945±0.001 h with an amplitude of 0.09±0.01 in magnitude. This result is consistent with previous determinations.[4] Two stellar occultation events involving this asteroid were observed from multiple sites in 2009. The resulting chords matched a smooth elliptical cross-section with dimensions of 134.0±4.0 km × 108.9±0.7 km.[5]

In popular culture

A space station orbiting 81 Terpsichore is the main setting in the science fiction story The Dark Colony (Asteroid Police Book 1) by Richard Penn.

References

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  2. ^ Asteroid Data Sets Archived 2009-12-17 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ Tempel, M. (November 1864), "Minor Planet 81 Terpsichore discovered", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 25: 31, Bibcode:1864MNRAS..25...31T.
  4. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (July 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 28 Bellona, 81 Terpsichore, 126 Velleda 150 Nuwa, 161 Athor, 419 Aurelia, and 632 Pyrrha", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 38 (3): 156−158, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..156P.
  5. ^ Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Pilcher, F.; Albers, J.; Beard, T.; Berger, B.; Berman, B.; Breit, D.; Case, T.; Collier, D.; Dantowitz, R.; Davies, T.; Desmarais, V.; Dunham, D.; Dunham, J.; Garlitz, J.; Garrett, L.; George, T.; Hill, M.; Hughes, Z.; Jacobson, G.; Kozubal, M.; Liu, Y.; Maley, P.; Morgan, W.; Morris, P.; Mroz, G.; Pool, S.; Preston, S.; Shelton, R.; Welch, S.; Westfall, J.; Whitman, A.; Wiggins, P. (October 2010), "Occultations by 81 Terpsichore and 694 Ekard in 2009 at Different Rotational Phase Angles", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 37 (4): 140−142, Bibcode:2010MPBu...37..140T.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)

External links