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2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup

2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup
Tournament details
Countries England
 France
 Ireland
 Italy
 Romania
 Russia
 Wales
Tournament format(s)Round-robin and Knockout
Date12 October 2018 - 10 May 2019
Tournament statistics
Teams20
Matches played66
Attendance510,167 (7,730 per match)
Highest Attendance28,438
Clermont v La Rochelle (Final)
10 May 2019
Lowest Attendance100
Enisei-STM v Bristol Bears
12 January 2019
Tries scored474 (7.18 per match)
Top point scorer(s)New Zealand Ihaia West (La Rochelle)
(64 points)
Top try scorer(s)Australia Peter Betham (Clermont)
(10 tries)
Final
VenueSt James' Park, Newcastle upon Tyne
ChampionsFrance Clermont (3rd title)
Runners-upFrance La Rochelle
← 2017–18 (Previous)
(Next) 2019–20 →

The 2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup is the fifth edition of the European Rugby Challenge Cup, an annual second-tier rugby union competition for professional clubs. Including the predecessor competition, the original European Challenge Cup, this is the 23rd edition of European club rugby's second-tier competition. Clubs from five of the nations that participate in the Six Nations Championship (Scotland being the only exception), along with club-sides from Romania and Russia, are competing.

The first round of the group stage began on 12 October 2018, and the competition will end with the final on 10 May 2019 in Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.[1] This will be the second time the final will be held in England in the era of the current Challenge Cup, and the 12th including finals of the original Challenge Cup.

Teams

A total of 20 teams qualified for the 2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup; 18 qualified from across the Gallagher Premiership, Guinness Pro14 and Top 14, as a direct result of their domestic league performance, with two qualifying through the Continental Shield competition. Subject to the allocation of the 20th place in the 2018–19 Champions Cup as per EPCR rules,[2] the expected distribution of teams is:

  • England: five teams
  • France: eight teams
    • Any teams finishing between 7th and 12th position in the Top 14
    • The champion from the Pro D2
    • The winner of the promotion-relegation play-off between the team in 13th position in the Top 14 and the runner-up of the Pro D2
  • Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales: five teams
    • Any teams, excluding the South African teams, that did not qualify for the Champions Cup, through the Guinness Pro14
    • No team from Scotland ultimately participated, as Edinburgh and Glasgow Warriors qualified for the 2018–19 Champions Cup.
  • Romania: one team
  • Russia: one team
    • One team qualified through the 2017–18 Continental Shield.

The following clubs qualified for the Challenge Cup.

Gallagher Premiership Top 14 Pro14 Continental Shield
England England France France Ireland Ireland Italy Italy Wales Wales Russia Russia Romania Romania

Qualifying competition - European Rugby Continental Shield

The qualification tournament was reformatted as a competition in its own right, the European Rugby Continental Shield, in 2017. Eight teams were split into two pools of four to compete in the pool stage of the European Rugby Continental Shield. Each team played the four teams in the other pool once. The winner of each pool then played-off against the runner-up of the other pool. The winners of these two qualifying play-offs played each other in a two-legged play-off for a place in the Challenge Cup.

The two Russian teams who had competed in the 2017–18 tournament played each other in a two-legged qualifying play-off for a place in the Challenge Cup. The winners of the two qualifying play-offs, having both qualified for the Challenge Cup, then played each other in the European Rugby Continental Shield final in May 2018.

Pool Play-offs

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Batumi Georgia (country) 18–32 Romania Timișoara Saracens 6–11 12–21
Heidelberger RK Germany 51–42 Italy Calvisano 34–29 17–13

Qualifying Play-offs

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Enisei-STM Russia 74–48 Russia Krasny Yar 47–22 27–26
Timișoara Saracens Romania 41–47 Germany Heidelberger RK 26–20 15–27

Continental Shield Final

Ineligible teams

Heidelberger RK were due to become the first German club to take part in either of the two major European rugby union competitions after qualification from the 2017–18 European Rugby Continental Shield. However, they were ruled ineligible by EPC Rugby due to their primary financial backer, Hans-Peter Wild, also being the majority shareholder in Stade Français and therefore being in a position to influence two teams in the competition.[3]

Timișoara Saracens, who had been eliminated by Heidelberger RK at the Continental Shield semi-final stage (effectively the Challenge Cup play-off) were confirmed as their replacement on 11 June 2018.[4]

Team details

Below is the list of coaches, captain and stadiums with their method of qualification for each team.

Note: Placing shown in brackets, denotes standing at the end of the regular season for their respective leagues, with their end of season positioning shown through CH for Champions, RU for Runner-up, SF for losing Semi-finalist and QF for losing Quarter-finalist.

Team Coach /
Director of Rugby
Captain Stadium Capacity Method of Qualification
France Agen Argentina Mauricio Reggiardo
France Stéphane Prosper
France Antoine Erbani Stade Armandie 14,000 Top 14 8th-12th (11th)
Italy Benetton New Zealand Kieran Crowley Italy Dean Budd Stadio Comunale di Monigo 6,700 Pro14 (5B)
France Bordeaux Bègles England Rory Teague France Clément Maynadier Stade Chaban-Delmas 34,694 Top 14 8th-12th (10th)
England Bristol Bears Samoa Pat Lam N/A (Leadership Group)[5] Ashton Gate 27,000 RFU Championship Champion
France Clermont France Franck Azéma France Damien Chouly Parc des Sports Marcel Michelin 19,022 Top 14 8th-12th (9th)
Ireland Connacht Australia Andy Friend Australia Jarrad Butler Galway Sportsgrounds 8,129 Pro14 (6A)
Wales Dragons Ireland Bernard Jackman Wales Cory Hill Rodney Parade 8,700 Pro14 (6B)
Russia Enisei-STM Russia Alexander Pervukhin Latvia Uldis Saulite Krasny Yar Stadium
Sochi Central Stadium
3,600
10,200
Continental Shield Champions
France Grenoble France Stéphane Glas
South Africa Dewald Senekal
France Antonin Berruyer Stade des Alpes 20,068 Pro D2 play-off winner
England Harlequins England Paul Gustard
Australia Billy Millard
Australia James Horwill
England Chris Robshaw
Twickenham Stoop 14,800 Premiership 8th-11th (10th)
France La Rochelle France Xavier Garbajosa
France Grégory Patat
New Zealand Victor Vito Stade Marcel-Deflandre 16,000 Top 14 8th-12th (7th)
England Northampton Saints New Zealand Chris Boyd England Dylan Hartley
England Alex Waller
Franklin's Gardens 15,249 Premiership 8th-11th (9th)
Wales Ospreys Ireland Allen Clarke Wales Justin Tipuric Liberty Stadium 20,827 Pro14 (5A) [b]
France Pau New Zealand Simon Mannix France Julien Tomas Stade du Hameau 18,324 Top 14 8th-12th (8th)
France Perpignan France Alain Hyardet
France Grégory Patat
France François Gelez
France Guillaume Vilaceca Stade Aimé Giral 14,593 Pro D2 Champion
England Sale Sharks England Steve Diamond South Africa Jono Ross AJ Bell Stadium 12,000 Premiership 8th-11th (8th)
France Stade Français South Africa Heyneke Meyer Italy Sergio Parisse Stade Jean-Bouin 20,000 Top 14 (12th)
Romania Timișoara Saracens South Africa Chester Williams Romania Vasile Rus Stadionul Dan Păltinișanu 32,972 Continental Shield (3rd) [c]
England Worcester Warriors South Africa Alan Solomons South Africa GJ van Velze Sixways Stadium 11,499 Premiership 8th-11th (11th)
Italy Zebre Ireland Michael Bradley Italy Tommaso Castello Stadio Sergio Lanfranchi 5,000 Pro14 (7A)

Seeding

The 20 competing teams were seeded and split into four tiers; seeding was based on performance in their respective domestic leagues. Where promotion and relegation is in effect in a league, the promoted team was seeded last, or (if multiple teams are promoted) by performance in the lower competition.[6] [7]

Rank Top 14 Premiership Pro 14 Continental Shield
1 France La Rochelle England Sale Sharks Italy Benetton Russia Enisei-STM
2 France Pau England Northampton Saints Wales Ospreys Romania Timișoara Saracens
3 France Clermont England Harlequins Ireland Connacht
4 France Bordeaux England Worcester Warriors Italy Zebre
5 France Agen England Bristol Bears Wales Dragons
6 France Stade Français
7 France Perpignan
8 France Grenoble

Teams are taken from a league in order of rank and put into a tier. A draw is used to allocate two second seeds to Tier 1; the remaining team goes into Tier 2. This allocation indirectly determines which fourth-seeded team entered Tier 2, while the others enter Tier 3.

Given the nature of the Continental Shield — a competition including developing rugby nations and Italian clubs not competing in the Pro14 — the two qualifiers from that competition were automatically included in Tier 4 and are seeded equally, despite officially being ranked 1 and 2 from that competition.

The brackets show each team's seeding and their league (for example, 1 Top 14 indicates the team was seeded 1st from the Top 14).

Tier 1 England Sale Sharks (1 Prem) Italy Benetton (1 Pro14) France La Rochelle (1 Top 14) France Pau (2 Top 14) England Northampton Saints (2 Prem)
Tier 2 Wales Ospreys (2 Pro14) England Harlequins (3 Prem) Ireland Connacht (3 Pro14) France Clermont (3 Top 14) Italy Zebre (4 Pro14)
Tier 3 England Worcester Warriors (4 Prem) France Bordeaux (4 Top 14) England Bristol Bears (5 Prem) Wales Dragons (5 Pro14) France Agen (5 Top 14)
Tier 4 France Stade Français (6 Top 14) France Perpignan (7 Top 14) France Grenoble (8 Top 14) Russia Enisei-STM (CS 1) Romania Timișoara Saracens (CS 2)

Pool stage

2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup is located in Europe
Enisei-STM (not on map)
Enisei-STM
(not on map)
2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup
Locations of teams of the 2018–19 European Rugby Challenge Cup group stage in Europe.
Brown pog.svg Brown: Pool 1; Red pog.svg Red: Pool 2; Orange pog.svg Orange: Pool 3; Yellow pog.svg Yellow: Pool 4; Green pog.svg Green: Pool 5.

The draw took place on 20 June 2018 in the Olympic Museum, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Teams in the same pool play each other twice, both at home and away in the group stage started in October 2018, and continues through to January 2019. The pool winners and three best runners-up progressed to the quarter finals.

Teams are awarded competition points, based on match result. Teams receive four points for a win, two points for a draw, one attacking bonus point for scoring four or more tries in a match and one defensive bonus point for losing a match by seven points or fewer.[8]

In the event of a tie between two or more teams, the following tie-breakers will be used, as directed by EPCR:

  1. Where teams have played each other
    1. The club with the greater number of competition points from only matches involving tied teams.
    2. If equal, the club with the best aggregate points difference from those matches.
    3. If equal, the club that scored the most tries in those matches.
  2. Where teams remain tied and/or have not played each other in the competition (i.e. are from different pools)
    1. The club with the best aggregate points difference from the pool stage.
    2. If equal, the club that scored the most tries in the pool stage.
    3. If equal, the club with the fewest players suspended in the pool stage.
    4. If equal, the drawing of lots will determine a club's ranking.
Key to colours
     Winner of each pool, advance to quarter-finals.
     Three highest-scoring second-place teams advance to quarter-finals.

Pool 1

Team
P W D L PF PA Diff TF TA TB LB Pts
France Clermont (1) 6 6 0 0 304 117 187 44 16 6 0 30
England Northampton Saints (8) 6 4 0 2 282 127 155 51 18 5 0 21
Wales Dragons 6 2 0 4 179 201 –22 26 29 2 0 10
Romania Timișoara Saracens 6 0 0 6 49 369 –320 6 51 0 0 0

Pool 2

Team
P W D L PF PA Diff TF TA TB LB Pts
England Worcester Warriors (4) 6 5 0 1 150 125 25 19 16 2 0 22
Wales Ospreys 6 2 0 4 141 105 36 18 12 2 3 13
France Pau 6 3 0 3 89 127 –38 12 16 1 0 13
France Stade Français 6 2 0 4 140 163 –23 16 21 2 2 12

Pool 3

Team
P W D L PF PA Diff TF TA TB LB Pts
England Sale Sharks (3) 6 4 0 2 196 108 88 27 12 4 2 22
Ireland Connacht (6) 6 5 0 1 146 120 26 19 14 2 0 22
France Bordeaux Bègles 6 2 1 3 137 171 –34 17 23 1 1 12
France Perpignan 6 0 1 5 117 197 –80 13 27 0 1 3

Pool 4

Team
P W D L PF PA Diff TF TA TB LB Pts
France La Rochelle (2) 6 5 0 1 238 104 134 32 15 4 0 24
England Bristol Bears (7) 6 4 0 2 267 108 159 42 13 4 1 21
Italy Zebre 6 3 0 3 153 142 11 21 18 2 0 14
Russia Enisei-STM 6 0 0 6 103 407 –304 14 63 1 0 1

Pool 5

Team
P W D L PF PA Diff TF TA TB LB Pts
England Harlequins (5) 6 4 0 2 179 113 66 23 13 3 2 21
Italy Benetton 6 4 0 2 171 106 65 23 12 3 1 20
France Grenoble 6 2 0 4 92 159 –67 11 21 0 1 9
France Agen 6 2 0 4 112 176 –64 15 26 0 1 9


Ranking of pool leaders and runners-up

Rank Pool Leaders Pts Diff TF
1 France Clermont 30 187 44
2 France La Rochelle 24 134 32
3 England Sale Sharks 22 88 27
4 England Worcester Warriors 22 25 19
5 England Harlequins 21 66 23
Rank Pool Runners–up Pts Diff TF
6 Ireland Connacht 22 26 19
7 England Bristol Bears 21 159 42
8 England Northampton Saints 21 155 42
9 Italy Benetton 20 65 23
10 Wales Ospreys 13 36 18

Knock-out stage

Format

The eight qualifiers are ranked according to their performance in the pool stage and compete in the quarter-finals which will be held on the weekend of 28–31 March 2019. The four top teams will host the quarter-finals against the four lower teams in a 1v8, 2v7, 3v6 and 4v5 format.

The semi-finals will be played on the weekend of 19–21 April 2019. As in recent seasons, a fixed semi-final bracket is set in advance. However, beginning this season the higher-seeded team will host each semi-final regardless of whether they won their quarter-final at home or on the road.[9]

The winners of the semi-finals will contest the final, at St James' Park, on 10 May 2019.

Bracket

Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
         
1 France Clermont 61
8 England Northampton Saints 38
1 France Clermont 32
5 England Harlequins 27
4 England Worcester Warriors 16
5 England Harlequins 18
1 France Clermont 36
2 France La Rochelle 16
2 France La Rochelle 39
7 England Bristol Bears 15
2 France La Rochelle 24
3 England Sale Sharks 20
3 England Sale Sharks 20
6 Ireland Connacht 10

Quarter-finals

29 March 2019
19:45 GMT UTC+0
Sale Sharks England (3) 20–10 (6) Ireland Connacht
Try: McGuigan 9' c
Solomona 14' c
Con: MacGinty (2/2) 10', 16'
Pen: MacGinty (2/2) 28', 33'
Report[10] Try: Godwin 67' c
Con: Leader (1/1) 68'
Pen: Carty (1/2) 7'
Leader (0/1)
AJ Bell Stadium
Attendance: 4,649
Referee: Mathieu Raynal (FFR)
30 March 2019
20:15 GMT UTC+0
Worcester Warriors England (4) 16–18 (5) England Harlequins
Try: Heem 23' m
Howe 46' m
Con: Weir (0/2)
Pen: Weir (2/3) 60', 74'
Report[11] Try: Murley 16' m
Tapuai 67' c
Con: Smith (0/1)
Catrakilis (1/1) 69'
Pen: Smith (1/1) 36'
Catrakilis (1/1) 75'
Sixways Stadium
Attendance: 6,349
Referee: Alexandre Ruiz (FFR)
31 March 2019
13:45 CEST UTC+2
La Rochelle France (2) 39–15 (7) England Bristol Bears
Try: Alldritt 12' c
Penalty try 20'
Doumayrou 26' c
Liebenberg 40' m
Rattez 71' c
Con: West (2/3) 13', 27'
Lamb (1/1) 72'
Pen: West (2/2) 7', 52'
Report[12] Try: Luatua 35' c
O'Conor 79' m
Con: Madigan (1/1) 36'
Sheedy (0/1)
Pen: Madigan (1/1) 17'
Stade Marcel-Deflandre
Attendance: 15,000
Referee: John Lacey (IRFU)
31 March 2019
19:00 CEST UTC+2
Clermont France (1) 61–38 (8) England Northampton Saints
Try: Betham (3) 19' m, 48' m, 76' c
Penaud (3) 25' c, 57' c, 75' c
Penalty try 27'
Nanai-Williams 71' c
Con: Parra (1/3) 26'
Laidlaw (4/4) 58', 72', 76', 77'
Pen: Parra (2/2) 1', 43'
Laidlaw (1/1) 69'
Report[13] Try: Tuala 55' c
Burrell 61' c
Mitchell 63' c
Hutchinson 65' c
Moon 78' c
Con: Hutchinson (5/5) 56', 61', 63', 66', 79'
Pen: Biggar (1/1) 9'

Semi-finals

20 April 2019
18:30 CEST UTC+2
La Rochelle France (2) 24–20 (3) England Sale Sharks
Try: Penalty try 23'
Murimurivalu 25' c
Alldritt 50' c
Con: West (2/2) 27', 52'
Pen: West (1/2) 16'
Report[14] Try: Penalty try 13'
Ashton 33' c
Con: MacGinty (1/1) 34'
Pen: MacGinty (2/3) 20', 68'
Stade Marcel-Deflandre
Attendance: 16,000
Referee: Nigel Owens (WRU)
20 April 2019
21:00 CEST UTC+2
Clermont France (1) 32–27 (5) England Harlequins
Try: Lee 31' c
Penaud 35' c
Con: Parra (2/2) 33', 36'
Pen: Parra (4/4) 28', 40'+3, 47', 54'
Drop: Lopez (2/2) 9', 25'
Report[15] Try: Brown 38' m
Robshaw 57' c
Lang 65' c
Dombrandt 79' m
Con: Smith (2/4) 58', 66'
Pen: Smith (1/1) 12'
Parc des Sports Marcel Michelin
Attendance: 17,923
Referee: John Lacey (IRFU)

Final

10 May 2019
19:45 BST UTC+1
Clermont France (1) 36–16 (2) France La Rochelle
Try: Penaud 30' c
Lee 60' c
Fofana 72' c
Con: Laidlaw (3/3) 31', 61', 72'
Pen: Parra (1/1) 13'
Laidlaw (4/4) 23', 52', 57', 80'
Report[16] Try: Atonio 65'
Con: West (1/1) 66'
Pen: West (3/4) 25', 35', 48'
St James' Park
Attendance: 28,438
Referee: Wayne Barnes (RFU)

Attendances

  • Does not include the attendance at the final as it takes place at a neutral venue.
Club Home
Games
Total Average Highest Lowest % Capacity
France Agen 3 7,297 2,432 3,187 2,020 17%
Italy Benetton 3 9,980 3,327 4,600 2,480 50%
France Bordeaux Bègles 3 41,628 13,876 17,129 11,899 40%
England Bristol Bears 3 25,424 8,475 8,852 7,983 31%
France Clermont 5 80,761 16,152 17,923 15,399 85%
Ireland Connacht 3 16,118 5,373 6,229 4,878 66%
Wales Dragons 3 13,506 4,502 4,600 4,306 52%
Russia Enisei-ETM 3 3,300 1,100 2,700 100 27%
France Grenoble 3 22,597 7,532 7,897 6,970 38%
England Harlequins 3 25,609 8,536 9,532 6,838 58%
France La Rochelle 5 76,000 15,200 16,000 15,000 95%
England Northampton Saints 3 34,088 11,363 11,739 10,637 75%
Wales Ospreys 3 18,149 6,050 6,184 5,893 29%
France Pau 3 20,403 6,801 9,730 4,524 37%
France Perpignan 3 16,870 5,623 8,038 3,666 39%
England Sale Sharks 4 16,306 4,077 4,649 3,049 34%
France Stade Francais 3 17,670 5,890 6,880 4,250 29%
Romania Timișoara Saracens[d] 2 3,000 1,500 2,000 1,000 5%
England Worcester Warriors 4 26,923 6,731 6,978 6,349 59%
Italy Zebre 3 6,100 2,033 2,800 1,500 41%

[18]

Individual statistics

  • Points scorers includes tries as well as conversions, penalties and drop goals. Appearance figures also include coming on as substitutes (unused substitutes not included).

Season records

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The English league was sponsored by Aviva during the 2017–18 season.
  2. ^ Ospreys lost the 7th place play-off to Ulster, missing out on qualification for the European Rugby Champions Cup.
  3. ^ Timișoara Saracens qualified for the European Challenge Cup after runners-up Heidelberger RK were disqualified due to owner Hans-Peter Wild also being a primary shareholder at Stade Français, leading to a potential conflict of interest if these teams were to meet in this season's competition.[4]
  4. ^ Timișoara Saracens only played 2 home games as their home game against Northampton Saints on 15 December 2018 was cancelled due to poor weather.[17]

References

  1. ^ "European club rugby finals to break new ground in 2018 and 2019". epcrugby.com.
  2. ^ "Champions Cup Qualification". epcrugby.com.
  3. ^ "Strong line-up confirmed for 2018/19 Challenge Cup". epcrugby.com.
  4. ^ a b "Pool Draws for 2018/19 Heineken Champions Cup and Challenge Cup". epcrugby.com.
  5. ^ "Bristol Bears Premiership Rugby". Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  6. ^ "Watch the Champions Cup and Challenge Cup Pool Draws live : News | ERC | Official Website". ERCRugby.com. 7 June 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-10-31. Retrieved 8 June 2014.
  7. ^ "2018/19 Challenge Cup Pool Draw" (PDF). epcrugby.com.
  8. ^ "Champions Cup Rules". epcrugby.com. Archived from the original on 2015-05-04. Retrieved 2018-04-28.
  9. ^ "Challenge Cup semi-finals". EPCR. 19 January 2019. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  10. ^ "Sale secure Challenge Cup semi-final spot". European Professional Club Rugby. 29 March 2019. Retrieved 30 March 2019.
  11. ^ "Harlequins into last four after tense away success". European Professional Club Rugby. 30 March 2019. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  12. ^ "La Rochelle into Challenge Cup semi-finals after dominant victory". European Professional Club Rugby. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  13. ^ "Clermont reach last four after beating Northampton in 13-try thriller". European Professional Club Rugby. 31 March 2019. Retrieved 31 March 2019.
  14. ^ "La Rochelle reach first European final after beating Sale in thriller". European Professional Club Rugby. 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  15. ^ "Clermont beat spirited Harlequins to set up all-French final". European Professional Club Rugby. 20 April 2019. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  16. ^ "Clermont clinch third Challenge Cup with victory over La Rochelle". European Professional Club Rugby. 10 May 2019. Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  17. ^ "Timisoara Saracens C-C Northampton Saints". European Professional Club Rugby. 15 December 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  18. ^ a b "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Home attendance". Rugby Statbunker. 20 April 2019.
  19. ^ a b "Player Statistics". EPCR. 10 May 2019.
  20. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most points in a match (Team)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  21. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most tries in a match (Team)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  22. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most conversions in a match (Team)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  23. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most penalties in a match (Team)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  24. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most points in a match (Player)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  25. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most tries in a match (Player)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  26. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most conversions in a match (Player)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.
  27. ^ "European Rugby Challenge Cup 18/19 Most penalties in a match (Player)". Rugby Statbunker. 10 May 2019.