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2017 Masters Tournament

"2017 Masters" redirects here. For the snooker tournament, see 2017 Masters (snooker).
2017 Masters Tournament
MastersTournamentLogo.svg
Tournament information
Dates April 6–9, 2017
Location Augusta, Georgia, U.S.
Course(s) Augusta National Golf Club
Tour(s)
Statistics
Par 72
Length 7,435 yards (6,799 m)
Field 93 players, 53 after cut
Cut 150 (+6)
Prize fund $11,000,000
10,211,750
Winner's share $1,980,000
€1,838,115
Champion
Spain Sergio García
279 (−9), playoff
Augusta  is located in the US
Augusta 
Augusta 
Location in the United States

The 2017 Masters Tournament was the 81st edition of the Masters Tournament and the first of golf's four major championships in 2017. It was held on April 6–9 at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia.

Sergio García beat Justin Rose in a sudden-death playoff after they both completed the 72 holes in nine-under-par. This was García's first major championship title, which came in his 74th attempt. Previously, García finished in the top-10 on 22 occasions. He was the first Spaniard to win the Masters since José María Olazábal in 1999.[1]

Course

Hole Name Yards Par Hole Name Yards Par
1 Tea Olive 445 4 10 Camellia 495 4
2 Pink Dogwood 575 5 11 White Dogwood 505 4
3 Flowering Peach 350 4 12 Golden Bell 155 3
4 Flowering Crab Apple 240 3 13 Azalea 510 5
5 Magnolia 455 4 14 Chinese Fir 440 4
6 Juniper 180 3 15 Firethorn 530 5
7 Pampas 450 4 16 Redbud 170 3
8 Yellow Jasmine 570 5 17 Nandina 440 4
9 Carolina Cherry 460 4 18 Holly 465 4
Out 3,725 36 In 3,710 36
Source: Total 7,435 72

Field

The Masters has the smallest field of the four major championships. Officially, the Masters remains an invitation event, but there is a set of qualifying criteria that determines who is included in the field. Each player is classified according to the first category by which he qualified, with other categories in which he qualified shown in parentheses.[2]

Golfers who qualify based solely on their performance in amateur tournaments (categories 7–11) must remain amateurs on the starting day of the tournament to be eligible to play.

1. Past Masters Champions

Ángel Cabrera, Fred Couples, Trevor Immelman, Zach Johnson (3,18,19), Bernhard Langer, Sandy Lyle, Phil Mickelson (3,14,17,18,19), Larry Mize, José María Olazábal, Mark O'Meara, Charl Schwartzel (17,18,19), Adam Scott (17,18,19), Vijay Singh, Jordan Spieth (2,12,16,17,18,19), Bubba Watson (17,18,19), Mike Weir, Danny Willett (12,18,19), Ian Woosnam

2. Winners of the last five U.S. Opens

Martin Kaymer (5,19), Justin Rose (6,12,18,19), Webb Simpson

3. Winners of the last five British Opens

Ernie Els, Rory McIlroy (4,12,16,17,18,19), Henrik Stenson (14,18,19)

4. Winners of the last five PGA Championships

Jason Day (5,12,15,16,17,18,19), Jason Dufner (17), Jimmy Walker (15,17,18,19)

5. Winners of the last three The Players Championships

Rickie Fowler (16,18,19)

6. Winner of the 2016 Olympic Golf Tournament
7. Top two finishers in the 2016 U.S. Amateur

Brad Dalke (a), Curtis Luck (a,9)

8. Winner of the 2016 Amateur Championship

Scott Gregory (a)

9. Winner of the 2016 Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship
10. Winner of the 2017 Latin America Amateur Championship

Toto Gana (a)

11. Winner of the 2016 U.S. Mid-Amateur

Stewart Hagestad (a)

12. The top 12 finishers and ties in the 2016 Masters Tournament

Daniel Berger (16,17,18,19), Paul Casey (17,18,19), Matthew Fitzpatrick (18,19), J. B. Holmes (14,17,18,19), Søren Kjeldsen (18), Hideki Matsuyama (15,16,17,18,19), Brandt Snedeker (17,18,19), Lee Westwood (18)

13. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2016 U.S. Open

Jim Furyk (18), Shane Lowry (18), Scott Piercy (18,19)

14. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2016 British Open Championship

Steve Stricker

15. Top 4 finishers and ties in the 2016 PGA Championship

Branden Grace (15,16,18,19), Brooks Koepka (18,19), Daniel Summerhays

16. Winners of PGA Tour events that award a full-point allocation for the FedEx Cup, between the 2016 Masters Tournament and the 2017 Masters Tournament

Sergio García (18,19), Adam Hadwin (19), James Hahn, Russell Henley, Charley Hoffman, Mackenzie Hughes, Billy Hurley III, Kim Si-woo (17), Russell Knox (17,18,19), Marc Leishman (19), William McGirt (17,18), Ryan Moore (17,18,19), Rod Pampling, Pat Perez, Jon Rahm (19), Patrick Reed (17,18,19), Brendan Steele, Brian Stuard, Hudson Swafford, Justin Thomas (17,18,19), Jhonattan Vegas (17)

17. All players qualifying for the 2016 edition of the Tour Championship

Roberto Castro, Kevin Chappell (18,19), Emiliano Grillo (18,19), Kevin Kisner (19), Matt Kuchar (18,19), Kevin Na (18), Sean O'Hair, Gary Woodland (18,19)

18. Top 50 on the final 2016 Official World Golf Ranking list

An Byeong-hun, Rafael Cabrera-Bello (19), Bill Haas (19), Tyrrell Hatton (19), Yuta Ikeda (19), Francesco Molinari (19), Alexander Norén (19), Louis Oosthuizen (19), Thomas Pieters (19), Andy Sullivan, Bernd Wiesberger (19), Chris Wood

19. Top 50 on the Official World Golf Ranking list on March 27

Ross Fisher, Tommy Fleetwood, Hideto Tanihara, Wang Jeung-hun

20. International invitees

None

All five amateurs were appearing in their first Masters, as were fourteen professionals: Tommy Fleetwood, Adam Hadwin, Tyrrell Hatton, Mackenzie Hughes, Billy Hurley III, Kim Si-woo, William McGirt, Alexander Norén, Thomas Pieters, Jon Rahm, Brian Stuard, Daniel Summerhays, Hudson Swafford, and Wang Jeung-hun. All the professionals, and Scott Gregory, had previously appeared in a major.

Past champions in the field

Made the cut

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Place
Charl Schwartzel  South Africa 2011 74 72 68 68 282 −6 3
Adam Scott  Australia 2013 75 69 69 73 286 −2 T9
Jordan Spieth  United States 2015 75 69 68 75 287 −1 T11
Fred Couples  United States 1992 73 70 74 72 289 +1 T18
Phil Mickelson  United States 2004, 2006, 2010 71 73 74 72 290 +2 T22
Larry Mize  United States 1987 74 76 79 76 305 +17 52

Missed the cut

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Danny Willett  England 2016 73 78 151 +7
Zach Johnson  United States 2007 77 74 151 +7
Bubba Watson  United States 2012, 2014 74 78 152 +8
Vijay Singh  Fiji 2000 78 75 153 +9
José María Olazábal  Spain 1994, 1999 77 76 153 +9
Bernhard Langer  Germany 1985, 1993 75 78 153 +9
Ángel Cabrera  Argentina 2009 79 75 154 +10
Ian Woosnam  Wales 1991 76 78 154 +10
Trevor Immelman  South Africa 2008 79 76 155 +11
Mike Weir  Canada 2003 76 79 155 +11
Mark O'Meara  United States 1998 78 78 156 +12
Sandy Lyle  Scotland 1988 77 83 160 +16

Nationalities in the field

North America (44) South America (4) Europe (28) Oceania (6) Asia (6) Africa (5)
 Canada (3)  Argentina (2)  England (11)  Australia (5)  Japan (3)  South Africa (5)
 United States (41)  Chile (1)  Northern Ireland (1)  Fiji (1)  South Korea (3)
 Venezuela (1)  Scotland (2)
 Wales (1)
 Ireland (1)
 Austria (1)
 Belgium (1)
 Denmark (1)
 Germany (2)
 Italy (1)
 Spain (4)
 Sweden (2)

Par 3 contest

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Heavy rain forced the cancellation of the Par-3 contest for the first time in its history. Mike Weir recorded the only hole-in-one before play was suspended.[5]

Round summaries

First round

Thursday, April 6, 2017

After being one-over after five holes Charley Hoffman birdied eight of his next 12 holes to shoot a round of 65 (−7). His four-stroke advantage after the first round was the largest at the Masters since 1955.[6][7]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Charley Hoffman  United States 65 −7
2 William McGirt  United States 69 −3
3 Lee Westwood  England 70 −2
T4 Kevin Chappell  United States 71 −1
Jason Dufner  United States
Matthew Fitzpatrick  England
Sergio García  Spain
Russell Henley  United States
Phil Mickelson  United States
Justin Rose  England
Andy Sullivan  England

Second round

Friday, April 7, 2017

Charley Hoffman fell back to the pack with a three-over round of 75 and into a four-way tie for the lead. Rickie Fowler had four birdies and an eagle on his way to a round of 67 (−5), the lowest score of the round, and tied for the lead along with Sergio García and Thomas Pieters.[8] Garcia was originally credited with a triple-bogey seven on the 10th, but his score was later corrected to a five. Fifteen players were within five shots of the lead, including past champions Fred Couples, Phil Mickelson, Adam Scott, and Jordan Spieth.[9] Amateur Stewart Hagestad became the first U.S. Mid-Amateur champion to make the cut at the Masters since the winner of that tournament was granted entry in 1989.[10]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Rickie Fowler  United States 73-67=140 −4
Sergio García  Spain 71-69=140
Charley Hoffman  United States 65-75=140
Thomas Pieters  Belgium 72-68=140
5 William McGirt  United States 69-73=142 −2
T6 Fred Couples  United States 73-70=143 −1
Ryan Moore  United States 74-69=143
Jon Rahm  Spain 73-70=143
Justin Rose  England 71-72=143
T10 Phil Mickelson  United States 71-73=144 E
Adam Scott  Australia 75-69=144
Jordan Spieth  United States 75-69=144

Amateurs: Hagestad (+3), Luck (+6), Dalke (+9), Gregory (+13), Gana (+17)

Third round

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Justin Rose birdied five of his final seven holes to post a score of 67 (−5), the lowest of the round, and tie Sergio García for the lead. Charley Hoffman held solo possession of the lead before a bogey at 14 and double-bogey at 16 after hitting his tee shot in the water, finishing two shots behind.[11] Jordan Spieth was five-under on his round to get within a shot of the lead before a bogey at 18 also saw him fall to two behind.[12]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Sergio García  Spain 71-69-70=210 −6
Justin Rose  England 71-72-67=210
3 Rickie Fowler  United States 73-67-71=211 −5
T4 Charley Hoffman  United States 65-75-72=212 −4
Ryan Moore  United States 74-69-69=212
Jordan Spieth  United States 75-69-68=212
7 Adam Scott  Australia 75-69-69=213 −3
8 Charl Schwartzel  South Africa 74-72-68=214 −2
T9 Thomas Pieters  Belgium 72-68-75=215 −1
Lee Westwood  England 70-77-68=215

Amateurs: Hagestad (+5), Luck (+9)

Final round

Sunday, April 9, 2017

After Sergio García birdied two of his first three holes he opened up a three-shot lead. Beginning at the 6th, however, Justin Rose recorded three consecutive birdies to tie García. With bogeys by García at the 10th and 11th, Rose went ahead by two shots.[13] At the 13th, García was forced to take a drop when his tee shot found the trees, but was able to get up and down to save par while Rose missed his birdie attempt.[14] García made birdie at the 14th to get within one and hit his approach to the par-5 15th to 14 feet. After converting the eagle attempt, he once again tied Rose, who made birdie. On the par-3 16th, both hit approaches to within 8 feet, and Rose made his birdie while García missed. At the 17th, however, Rose found the greenside bunker and suffered a bogey while Garcia two-putted for par, once again tying for the lead heading to the last hole. Rose missed a seven-footer for birdie, while García missed a five-foot putt to win the championship, forcing a sudden-death playoff. Charl Schwartzel, the 2011 champion, recorded four birdies on the back-nine to shoot 68 (−4) and finish in third place, three shots behind García and Rose.[15] Thomas Pieters also shot 68 after making four straight birdies on holes 12–15 and finished in a tie for fourth place. Matt Kuchar birdied three consecutive holes on his final nine, then made a hole-in-one at the 16th to equal the lowest score of the round with 67 (−5) and finish in a tie with Pieters. Rickie Fowler began the round a shot out of the lead but recorded a score of 76 (+4) and dropped to 11th, while 2015 champion Jordan Spieth, two back at the start of the round, shot 75 (+3).[16][17]

After García took his drop on 13, some TV viewers reported the possibility that he caused his ball to move while removing some pine straw near his ball. Prior to the conclusion of the round Masters Officials determined there was no penalty.[18] Per Rule 18-2 (Decision 18/4) even if high definition TV camera evidence shows movement, there is no penalty if it is deemed that the movement was not reasonably discernible to the naked eye at the time.[19]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
T1 Sergio García  Spain 71-69-70-69=279 −9 Playoff
Justin Rose  England 71-72-67-69=279
3 Charl Schwartzel  South Africa 74-72-68-68=282 −6 748,000
T4 Matt Kuchar  United States 72-73-71-67=283 −5 484,000
Thomas Pieters  Belgium 72-68-75-68=283
6 Paul Casey  England 72-75-69-68=284 −4 396,000
T7 Kevin Chappell  United States 71-76-70-68=285 −3 354,750
Rory McIlroy  Northern Ireland 72-73-71-69=285
T9 Ryan Moore  United States 74-69-69-74=286 −2 308,000
Adam Scott  Australia 75-69-69-73=286

Amateurs: Hagestad (+6), Luck (+9)

Scorecard

Eagle Birdie Bogey Double bogey

Final round

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 5 4 3 4 3 4 5 4 4 4 3 5 4 5 3 4 4
Spain García −7 −7 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −7 −6 −6 −6 −7 −9 −9 −9 −9
England Rose −6 −6 −6 −6 −5 −6 −7 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −8 −9 −10 −9 −9
South Africa Schwartzel −2 −3 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −3 −4 −4 −5 −4 −5 −5 −5 −6
United States Kuchar +1 E +1 +1 +1 E −1 −1 E E E −1 −2 −3 −3 −5 −5 −5
Belgium Pieters −1 −2 −2 −1 −1 −1 −1 −2 −2 −2 −2 −3 −4 −5 −6 −5 −5 −5
United States Fowler −5 −5 −6 −5 −4 −4 −4 −5 −5 −5 −4 −3 −4 −4 −4 −3 −2 −1
United States Spieth −3 −4 −3 −3 −3 −2 −2 −2 −2 −1 −1 +1 +1 +2 +1 E E −1

Playoff

Beginning the sudden-death playoff at the par-4 18th, Rose's drive found the trees and he was forced to chip out. García's drive found the fairway and he hit his approach to 12 feet, while Rose was 14 feet away for par.[20] Rose missed the putt, giving García two putts to win the championship, but he converted the birdie to win his first career major championship. The win came in García's 19th Masters appearance and 74th major championship, the most by any player before their first win.[21]

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Sergio García  Spain 3 −1 1,980,000
2 Justin Rose  England 5 +1 1,188,000

References

  1. ^ Kupelian, Vartan (April 9, 2017). "Garcia Outlasts Rose to Claim First Major Victory". Masters Tournament. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  2. ^ "2017 Tournament Invitees". Masters. Retrieved January 24, 2017. 
  3. ^ Harig, Bob (March 31, 2017). "Tiger Woods to miss Masters for third time in last four years". ESPN. 
  4. ^ DiMeglio, Steve (April 6, 2017). "Dustin Johnson withdraws from Masters". USA Today. 
  5. ^ Kilbridge, Dan (April 5, 2017). "Masters Par 3 Contest wiped out, Augusta National closes course due to storms". Golfweek. 
  6. ^ "Charley Hoffman's 4-shot, opening Masters lead biggest in 62 years". ESPN. Associated Press. April 6, 2017. 
  7. ^ Murray, Scott; Butler, Michael (April 6, 2017). "The Masters 2017: first round – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved April 7, 2017. 
  8. ^ Murray, Scott; Butler, Michael (April 8, 2017). "The Masters 2017: second round – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved April 11, 2017. 
  9. ^ "Sergio Garcia, Thomas Pieters, Charley Hoffman share lead with Rickie Fowler". ESPN. Associated Press. April 7, 2017. 
  10. ^ Lavner, Ryan (April 7, 2017). "Hagestad first mid-am to make Masters cut". Golf Channel. 
  11. ^ Murray, Scott (April 9, 2017). "The Masters 2017: third round – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved April 11, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Justin Rose, Sergio Garcia tied atop Masters; Rickie Fowler 1 back". ESPN. Associated Press. April 8, 2017. 
  13. ^ Lawrenson, Derek (April 9, 2017). "The best golfer never to win a major wins the Masters! Spaniard Sergio Garcia finally breaks his duck of 73 tournaments after his nailbiting victory over Briton Justin Rose". Daily Mail. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  14. ^ Brennan, Christine (April 9, 2017). "Sergio Garcia finally rises to the occasion at Masters to win first major". USA Today. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  15. ^ Murray, Scott (April 9, 2017). "The Masters 2017: final round – as it happened!". The Guardian. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  16. ^ "Sergio Garcia outlasts Justin Rose to claim Masters, first major". ESPN. Associated Press. April 9, 2017. 
  17. ^ Beal, Joel (April 9, 2017). "Masters 2017: Live Updates – Sergio Garcia defeats Justin Rose to win his first green jacket". Golf Digest. 
  18. ^ Cunningham, Kevin (April 10, 2017). "Inside the alleged rules snafu that could have derailed Sergio's Masters victory". Golf.com. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  19. ^ "Rules and Decisions". United States Golf Association. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  20. ^ Jurejko, Jonathan (April 10, 2017). "Sergio Garcia pips Justin Rose to win at Augusta". BBC Sport. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 
  21. ^ Crouse, Karen (April 9, 2017). "Masters 2017: Sergio García Finally Wins First Major Title". The New York Times. Retrieved April 10, 2017. 

External links

Preceded by
2016 PGA Championship
Major Championships Succeeded by
2017 U.S. Open