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2016–17 World Rugby Sevens Series

2016–17 World Rugby Sevens
Series XVIII
Hosts
Date2 Dec 2016 – 21 May 2017
Final positions
Champions South Africa
Runners-up England
Third Fiji

The 2016–17 World Rugby Sevens Series, known for sponsorship reasons as the HSBC World Rugby Sevens Series, was the 18th annual series of rugby sevens tournaments for national rugby sevens teams. The Sevens Series has been run by World Rugby since 1999–2000. South Africa won the Series with a comfortable 28-point margin over England; South Africa won five of the ten tournaments.

The 2016–17 Series also served as a qualifying tournament for the 2018 Rugby World Cup Sevens. Nine of the core teams had already qualified but the four highest-placed finishers from among the remaining six core teams also gained qualification for the 2018 RWC Sevens.[1]

Core teams

Tour venues

The official schedule for the 2016–17 World Rugby Sevens Series was as follows:[3]

2016–17 Venues
Leg Stadium City Date Winner
Dubai The Sevens Dubai 2–3 December 2016  South Africa
South Africa Cape Town Stadium Cape Town 10–11 December 2016  England
New Zealand Westpac Stadium Wellington 28–29 January 2017  South Africa
Australia Allianz Stadium Sydney 4–5 February 2017  South Africa
United States Sam Boyd Stadium Las Vegas 3–5 March 2017  South Africa
Canada BC Place Vancouver 11–12 March 2017  England
Hong Kong Hong Kong Stadium Hong Kong 7–9 April 2017  Fiji
Singapore National Stadium Singapore 15–16 April 2017  Canada
France Stade Jean-Bouin Paris 13–14 May 2017  South Africa
England Twickenham Stadium London 20–21 May 2017  Scotland

There were no major changes to the schedule.

Standings

Final table:

2016–17 World Rugby Sevens
Series XVIII
 
Pos
Event 
Team

Dubai

Cape Town

Well­ington

Sydney

Las Vegas

Van­couver

Hong Kong

Singa­pore

Paris

London
Points
total
1  South Africa 22 19 22 22 22 19 19 12 22 13 192
2  England 17 22 10 19 13 22 10 17 15 19 164
3  Fiji 19 13 19 13 19 17 22 10 10 8 150
4  New Zealand 10 17 12 17 15 13 13 13 17 10 137
5  United States 8 10 5 12 17 15 15 19 13 15 129
6  Australia 13 5 7 15 12 10 17 15 7 12 113
7  Scotland 12 15 17 1 5 3 8 7 19 22 109
8  Canada 3 3 15 3 10 10 10 22 5 17 98
9  Argentina 5 7 13 10 10 12 12 3 8 10 90
10  Wales 15 10 5 10 3 8 2 8 5 7 73
11  France 10 8 10 7 5 1 5 5 10 5 66
12  Kenya 5 12 8 2 8 5 7 10 1 5 63
13  Samoa 7 1 3 5 7 7 1 5 12 3 51
14  Russia 1 5 2 8 1 1 5 2 2 2 29
15  Japan 1 1 1 5 2 2 3 1 3 1 20
16  Chile 1 5 6
17  Uganda 2 2 4
18  Papua New Guinea 1 1 2
19  Spain 1 1 2
20  South Korea 1 1
21  Hong Kong 1 1

Source: World Rugby. Archived [4]

Legend
Qualification for the 2017–18 World Sevens Series
No colour Core team in 2016–17 and re-qualified as a core team for the 2017–18 World Rugby Sevens Series
Pink Relegated as the lowest placed core team at the end of the 2016–17 season
Yellow Not a core team
Qualification for 2018 Rugby World Cup Sevens
Already confirmed for 2018 (host country United States and 2013 quarterfinalists)
Qualified as one of the four highest placed eligible teams from the 2016–17 World Rugby Sevens Series not already qualified.[5]

Players

Scoring leaders

Tries scored
Rank Player Tries
1 United States Perry Baker 57
2 England Dan Norton 51
3 Canada Justin Douglas 40
4 South Africa Seabelo Senatla 32
5 Scotland James Fleming 32
Points scored
Rank Player Points
1 United States Perry Baker 285
2 Wales Ethan Davies 281
3 United States Madison Hughes 279
4 Canada Nathan Hirayama 269
5 Scotland Scott Wight 266

Updated: 22 May 2017

Dream Team

Forwards Backs
South Africa Chris Dry
Fiji Kalione Nasoko
United States Danny Barrett
Fiji Jerry Tuwai
South Africa Rosko Specman
England Dan Norton
United States Perry Baker

Placings summary

Tallies of top four tournament placings during the 2016–17 series, by team:

Cup
Team 1st, gold medalist(s) Gold 2nd, silver medalist(s) Silver 3rd, bronze medalist(s) Bronze Fourth Total
 South Africa 5 3 - - 8
 England 2 2 2 1 7
 Fiji 1 3 1 - 5
 Scotland 1 1 1 1 4
 Canada 1 - 1 1 3
 United States - 1 1 3 5
 New Zealand - - 3 1 4
 Australia - - 1 2 3
 Wales - - - 1 1
Totals 10 10 10 10 40

Tournaments

In this series, World Rugby abolished the minor trophies of Plate, Bowl and Shield that were previously awarded in the finals play-offs at each tournament. While the winner's Cup was retained as the major trophy, the awarding of gold, silver and bronze medals to players from the three respective top-placed teams was introduced for this series with the third placed match now renamed as the Bronze medal match. A Challenge Trophy was established for teams competing in the lower bracket of the finals play-offs at each tournament.[6] Additionally, the playing time for Cup final matches was reduced from 20 minutes to 14 minutes, in line with all other tournament matches.

Dubai

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  South Africa 26–14  Fiji  England (Bronze)
 Wales
5th Place  Australia 19–12  Scotland  France
 New Zealand
Challenge Trophy  United States 28–14  Samoa  Argentina
 Kenya
13th Place  Canada 20–17  Uganda  Japan
 Russia

Cape Town

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  England 19–17  South Africa  New Zealand (Bronze)
 Scotland
5th Place  Fiji 33–21  Kenya  Wales
 United States
Challenge Trophy  France 19–7  Argentina  Australia
 Russia
13th Place  Canada 19–10  Uganda  Japan
 Samoa

Wellington

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  South Africa 26–5  Fiji  Scotland (Bronze)
 Canada
5th Place  Argentina 17–12  New Zealand  England
 France
Challenge Trophy  Kenya 19–17  Australia  United States
 Wales
13th Place  Samoa 19–12  Russia  Japan
 Papua New Guinea

Sydney

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  South Africa 29–14  England  New Zealand (Bronze)
 Australia
5th Place  Fiji 35–12  United States  Argentina
 Wales
Challenge Trophy  Russia 26–0  France  Samoa
 Japan
13th Place  Canada 10–5  Kenya  Papua New Guinea
 Scotland

Las Vegas

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  South Africa 19–12  Fiji  United States (Bronze)
 New Zealand
5th Place  England 10–7  Australia  Argentina
 Canada
Challenge Trophy  Kenya 21–14  Samoa  France
 Scotland
13th Place  Wales 21–19  Japan  Chile
 Russia

Vancouver

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  England 19–7  South Africa  Fiji (Bronze)
 United States
5th Place  New Zealand 17–14  Argentina  Canada
 Australia
Challenge Trophy  Wales 19–12  Samoa  Kenya
 Chile
13th Place  Scotland 24–19  Japan  France
 Russia

Hong Kong

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  Fiji 22–0  South Africa  Australia (Bronze)
 United States
5th Place  New Zealand 10–7  Argentina  Canada
 England
Challenge Trophy  Scotland 21–19  Kenya  France
 Russia
13th Place  Japan 28–21  Wales  South Korea
 Samoa
World Series Qualifier  Spain 12–7  Germany  Chile
 Papua New Guinea

Singapore

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  Canada 26–19  United States  England (Bronze)
 Australia
5th Place  New Zealand 17–12  South Africa  Kenya
 Fiji
Challenge Trophy  Wales 24–12  Scotland  Samoa
 France
13th Place  Argentina 40–19  Russia  Japan
 Hong Kong

Paris

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  South Africa 15–5  Scotland  New Zealand (Bronze)
 England
5th Place  United States 24–19  Samoa  Fiji
 France
Challenge Trophy  Argentina 33–12  Australia  Canada
 Wales
13th Place  Japan 19–10  Russia  Spain
 Kenya

London

Event Winners Score Finalists Semi-finalists
Cup  Scotland 12–7  England  Canada (Bronze)
 United States
5th Place  South Africa 28–17  Australia  Argentina
 New Zealand
Challenge Trophy  Fiji 26–14  Wales  France
 Kenya
13th Place  Samoa 24–19  Russia  Japan
 Spain

See also

References

  1. ^ [www.worldrugby.org]
  2. ^ "Japan win promotion to 2016-17 Series"
  3. ^ "HSBC Sevens World Series". Worldrugby.org. 2016-05-23. Retrieved 2016-05-27.
  4. ^ "HSBC Sevens World Series Standings". World Rugby. Archived from the original on 6 July 2017. Retrieved 3 December 2016.
  5. ^ Rugby World Cup Sevens 2018 qualification process. World Rugby.
  6. ^ "Men's and women's sevens winners to strike gold". World Rugby.org. 3 October 2016.

External links