This page uses content from Wikipedia and is licensed under CC BY-SA.

2002 XV93

2002 XV93
2002xv93-19920928.gif
Precovery image of 2003 XV93 taken by the Palomar Observatory in 1992[1]
Discovery[2]
Discovered byM. W. Buie
Discovery date10 December 2002
Designations
MPC designation2002 XV93
Plutino[3]
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc6582 days (18.02 yr)
Earliest precovery date16 October 1990
Aphelion44.427 AU (6.6462 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion34.405 AU (5.1469 Tm) (q)
39.416 AU (5.8965 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity0.12713 (e)
247.47 yr (90387.1 d)
282.08° (M)
0° 0m 14.338s /day (n)
Inclination13.281° (i)
19.170° (Ω)
163.53° (ω)
Earth MOID33.4096 AU (4.99801 Tm)
Jupiter MOID28.9574 AU (4.33197 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions549.2+21.7
−23.0
 km[5]
Mass≈1.7×1020 kg
Mean density
2 g/cm3
Equatorial surface gravity
0.15 g/cm3
Equatorial escape velocity
0.29 km/s
0.040+0.020
−0.015
[5]
B−V=0.72 ± 0.02
V−R=0.37 ± 0.02[5]
21.1[6]
5.42 ± 0.46,[5]
4.73 ± 0.02[7] 5.0[4]

2002 XV93, also written as 2002 XV93, is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) with an absolute magnitude of 5.4.[5] A 2:3 orbital resonance with Neptune makes it a plutino.[3]

It has been observed with precovery images back to 1990.[4]

Orbit and rotation

2002 XV93 is locked in 2:3 resonance with Neptune, which means that when it makes two revolutions around the Sun, Neptune makes exactly three.[3]

The rotation period of this object is not known.

Physical characteristics

The size of 2002 XV93 has been measured by the Herschel Space Telescope to be 549.2+21.7
−23.0
 km.[5]

It is likely a dwarf planet.[8]

References

  1. ^ Lowe, Andrew. "2002 XV93 Precovery Images". andrew-lowe.ca.
  2. ^ "List of Transneptunian Objects". IAU Minor Planet Center. Archived from the original on 27 October 2010. Retrieved 27 October 2010.
  3. ^ a b c "MPEC 2010-O39 :Distant Minor Planets (12 August 2010.0 TT)". Minor Planet Center & Tamkin Foundation Computer Network. 27 July 2010. Archived from the original on 20 May 2012. Retrieved 7 August 2010.
  4. ^ a b c "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 2002 XV93" (2008-10-23 last obs). Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Mommert, Michael; Harris, A. W.; Kiss, C.; Pál, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Stansberry, J.; Delsanti, A.; Vilenius, E.; Müller, T. G.; Peixinho, N.; Lellouch, E.; Szalai, N.; Henry, F.; Duffard, R.; Fornasier, S.; Hartogh, P.; Mueller, M.; Ortiz, J. L.; Protopapa, S.; Rengel, M.; Thirouin, A. (May 2012). "TNOs are cool: A survey of the trans-Neptunian region—V. Physical characterization of 18 Plutinos using Herschel-PACS observations". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 541: A93. arXiv:1202.3657. Bibcode:2012A&A...541A..93M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201118562.
  6. ^ "AstDys 2002XV93 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 7 August 2010.
  7. ^ Tegler, Stephen C. (1 February 2007). "Kuiper Belt Object Magnitudes and Surface Colors". Archived from the original on 1 September 2006. Retrieved 30 December 2009.
  8. ^ "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". Gps.caltech.edu. 21 July 2015. Retrieved 16 September 2016.

External links