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1962 in South Africa

1962
in
South Africa

Decades:
See also:

Events from the year 1962 in South Africa. This year is notable for its internal and international resistance campaigns against the country's Apartheid legislation. Umkhonto we Sizwe, the militant wing of the African National Congress, made its first sabotage attacks in 1961, and Nelson Mandela traveled to Ethiopia to rally support for Umkhonto and justify the attacks. Nelson Mandela was sentenced to jail for 5 years upon returning to South Africa for illegally leaving the country.[1] The international sporting community also showed its displeasure with the government's laws. FIFA suspended South Africa in 1962 for fielding an exclusively-white South African national football team, forcing South African football authorities to add black players to the team.[2] The government, in turn strengthened methods of enforcing Apartheid, and the Robben Island prison was made a political prison in 1962.[3]

Incumbents

Events

January
March
  • 12 – Defence Minister Jim Fouché outlines South Africa's defence policy to make South Africa self-supporting in military equipment.
May
July
August
October
  • 13 – Helen Joseph becomes the first person to be placed under house arrest under the Sabotage Act.
  • Lillian Ngoyi is banned for 10 years, confining her to Orlando Township in Johannesburg and forbidding her to attend any gatherings.
November
December
Unknown date

Births

Deaths

Railways

Sports

References

  1. ^ "11 January 1962 - Mandela skips the country and appears in Addis Ababa | South African History Online". v1.sahistory.org.za. Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  2. ^ "History of South African soccer". News24. 7 May 2004. Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  3. ^ Buntman, Fran Lisa. Robben Island and Prisoner Resistance to Apartheid. Cambridge University Press. p. 35. ISBN 9780521007825. Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  4. ^ Archontology.org: A Guide for Study of Historical Offices: South Africa: Heads of State: 1961-1994 (Accessed on 14 April 2017)