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1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers football
National champion (Billingsley)
Western Conference champion
ConferenceWestern Conference
1911 record6–0–1 (3–0–1 Western)
Head coachHenry L. Williams (12th season)
CaptainEarle T. Pickering
Home stadiumNorthrop Field
Seasons
← 1910
1912 →
1911 Western Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Minnesota $ 3 0 1     6 0 1
Chicago 5 1 0     6 1 0
Wisconsin 2 1 1     5 1 1
Illinois 2 2 1     4 2 1
Iowa 2 2 0     3 4 0
Purdue 1 3 0     3 4 0
Northwestern 1 4 0     3 4 0
Indiana 0 3 1     3 3 1
  • $ – Conference champion

The 1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team represented the University of Minnesota in the 1911 college football season. In their 12th year under head coach Henry L. Williams, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–0–1 record (2–0–1 against Western Conference opponents), won the conference championship for the third consecutive year, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 102 to 15.[1] The team has been recognized retroactively as the national champion by the Billingsley Report.[2]

Center Clifford Morrell and halfback Reuben Rosenwald were named All-Big Ten first team.[3]

Schedule

DateOpponentSiteResultAttendance
September 30Iowa State*W 5–02,500
October 7South Dakota*
  • Northrop Field
  • Minneapolis, MN
W 5–03,500
October 21Nebraska*
  • Northrop Field
  • Minneapolis, MN (Rivalry)
W 21–310,000
October 28Iowa
  • Northrop Field
  • Minneapolis, MN (Rivalry)
W 24–65,000
November 4Chicago
  • Northrop Field
  • Minneapolis, MN
W 30–020,000
November 18at WisconsinT 6–615,000
November 25at IllinoisW 11–010,000
  • *Non-conference game

References

  1. ^ "1911 Minnesota Golden Gophers Schedule and Results". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  2. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2015). "National Poll Rankings" (PDF). NCAA Division I Football Records. NCAA. p. 108. Retrieved January 4, 2016.
  3. ^ Keiser, Jeff (2007). "2007 Media Guide" (PDF). p. 180.[permanent dead link]