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1755

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1755 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1755
MDCCLV
Ab urbe condita2508
Armenian calendar1204
ԹՎ ՌՄԴ
Assyrian calendar6505
Balinese saka calendar1676–1677
Bengali calendar1162
Berber calendar2705
British Regnal year28 Geo. 2 – 29 Geo. 2
Buddhist calendar2299
Burmese calendar1117
Byzantine calendar7263–7264
Chinese calendar甲戌(Wood Dog)
4451 or 4391
    — to —
乙亥年 (Wood Pig)
4452 or 4392
Coptic calendar1471–1472
Discordian calendar2921
Ethiopian calendar1747–1748
Hebrew calendar5515–5516
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1811–1812
 - Shaka Samvat1676–1677
 - Kali Yuga4855–4856
Holocene calendar11755
Igbo calendar755–756
Iranian calendar1133–1134
Islamic calendar1168–1169
Japanese calendarHōreki 5
(宝暦5年)
Javanese calendar1680–1681
Julian calendarGregorian minus 11 days
Korean calendar4088
Minguo calendar157 before ROC
民前157年
Nanakshahi calendar287
Thai solar calendar2297–2298
Tibetan calendar阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1881 or 1500 or 728
    — to —
阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1882 or 1501 or 729

1755 (MDCCLV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1755th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 755th year of the 2nd millennium, the 55th year of the 18th century, and the 6th year of the 1750s decade. As of the start of 1755, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events

January–June

July–December

November 1: Lisbon earthquake

Date unknown


Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ "Black (Joseph)", in Bibliotheca Osleriana: A Catalogue of Books Illustrating the History of Medicine and Science by Sir William Osler (McGill-Queen's University Press, 1969) p116
  2. ^ "The Battle of the Monongahela". World Digital Library. 1755. Retrieved 2013-08-03. 
  3. ^ "Sailing Ship Dodington (history)". Dodington Family. 2002. Archived from the original on 2005-01-14. Retrieved 2 April 2012. 
  4. ^ "Tynet, St Ninian's Church". ScotlandsPlaces. Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland. Retrieved 2015-01-05.