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(471288) 2011 GM27

2011 GM27
Discovery[1]
Discovery siteLa Silla Obs. (809)
Discovery date2 April 2011
Designations
MPC designation2011 GM27
TNO · cubewano
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc3308 days (9.06 yr)
Aphelion45.277 AU (6.7733 Tm)
Perihelion42.628 AU (6.3771 Tm)
43.953 AU (6.5753 Tm)
Eccentricity0.030132
291.40 yr (106434 d)
70.965°
0° 0m 12.177s /day
Inclination13.033°
257.17°
214.93°
Earth MOID41.6532 AU (6.23123 Tm)
Jupiter MOID37.4516 AU (5.60268 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions446 km (assumed)[3]
0.06 (assumed)[3]
5.2[2]

(471288) 2011 GM27 is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) in the Kuiper belt. It orbits slightly outside a 3:5 resonance with Neptune, taking 16 years (5.5% of its orbit) longer to orbit the Sun than a body in 3:5 resonance. It was discovered on 2 April 2011 at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile. With an absolute magnitude of 5.2,[2] it is probably a dwarf planet, as its diameter has been roughly estimated to be about 450 kilometers based on an assumed geometric albedo of 0.06.[3] It has a Tisserand's parameter relative to Jupiter of 5.771.[2] Precovery observations exist dating back to 2006 in SDSS data.[4]

References

  1. ^ "2011 GM27". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 23 October 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2011 GM27)" (2015-01-28 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 31 March 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Archived from the original on 18 October 2011. Retrieved 31 August 2012.
  4. ^ "On the discovery and precovery of Trans-Neptunian Objects from SDSS images". talk.galaxyzoo.org. pp. 1–2. Retrieved 8 March 2015.

External links