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(470599) 2008 OG19

(470599) 2008 OG19
Discovery
Discovered byPalomar Observatory team
Discovery sitePalomar Observatory
Discovery date30 July 2008
Designations
MPC designation(470599) 2008 OG19
2008 OG19
scattered disc
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc2596 days (7.11 yr)
Aphelion94.004 AU (14.0628 Tm)
Perihelion38.576 AU (5.7709 Tm)
66.290 AU (9.9168 Tm)
Eccentricity0.41807
539.73 yr (197137 d)[1]
1.5681°
0° 0m 6.574s /day
Inclination13.167°
164.02°
140.53°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions619+56
−113
 km
(assuming albedo of 0.081)[2]
394+57
−63
 km
(assuming albedo of 0.199)[2]
Mean density
0.609±0.004 g/cm3[2]
0.544+0.042
−0.004
 g/cm3
(minimum)[2]
8.727±0.003 h[2]
0.081 (assumed as typical SDO albedo)[2]
0.199 (assumed)[2]
V–R=0.64[2]
4.39±0.07 (R-band)[2]

(470599) 2008 OG19 is a trans-Neptunian object and a possible dwarf planet located in the scattered disc.[3] It was discovered on 30 July 2008 through the Palomar Observatory.[4] It displays a large light curve amplitude of 0.437±0.011 magnitudes, implying that it is highly elongated in shape, similar to 20000 Varuna. Based on models for its light curve amplitude, they obtained an approximate density of 0.609 g/cm3 and aspect ratios of b/a = 0.513 and c/a = 0.39.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 470599 (2008 OG19)" (2015-09-08 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Fernández-Valenzuela, Estela; Ortiz, Jose Luis; Duffard, René (2015). "2008 OG19: A highly elongated Trans-Neptunian Object". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. arXiv:1511.06584. Bibcode:2016MNRAS.456.2354F. doi:10.1093/mnras/stv2739.
  3. ^ "List of Known Trans-Neptunian objects". JohnstonsArchive. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  4. ^ "470599 (2008 OG19)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 1 August 2017.

External links