Monkey Revives Monkey Unconscious at Kanpur India Train Station: Video | Time

Hero Monkey Revives Simian Pal Electrocuted in India

By Olivia B. Waxman December 22, 2014

Passengers at a train station in India Sunday watched a monkey attempt to revive a fellow monkey that was shocked unconscious by electrical wires.

The simian rescue occurred after one of the monkeys was electrocuted while walking on high-voltage wires, according to Reuters.

In this video footage from Kanpur in India, the monkey appears to try to wake up the other monkey by patting it and dragging it into a pool of water, while ticket-holders standing on the platform just watched and snapped photos with their smartphones.

After about 20 minutes, passengers could be heard cheering when the unconscious monkey seemed to come back to life.

[Reuters]

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