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BBC NEWS | In Depth | Photo Gallery | In pictures: Kabul's Moghul garden



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News Front Page Africa Americas Asia-Pacific Europe Middle East South Asia UK Business Health Science/Nature Technology Entertainment ----------------- Have Your Say In Pictures Week at a Glance Country Profiles In Depth Programmes RELATED BBC SITES Last Updated: Thursday, 6 November, 2003, 10:11 GMT E-mail this to a friend In pictures: Kabul's Moghul garden
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The Bagh-e Babur was once one of Kabul's top tourist spots - containing the tomb of Zahiruddin Muhammad Babur, who founded the Moghul empire that ruled India for 300 years. (Text and photos: Sanjoy Majumder) 2 of 9
Perched on a hill west of the Afghan capital, it lies scarred by 20 years of war, its trees felled, its grand walls destroyed by shells. 3 of 9
Now the US and German embassies and the Aga Khan Trust for Culture have funded an NGO to begin restoration work at the site. 4 of 9
Bagh-e Babur is a terraced and walled open space containing features and remains of what is thought to be the first Moghul Garden, inspiring many imperial gardens in South Asia. 5 of 9
The pavilion has been fully restored and there are plans for a restaurant. The gardens will be replanted with trees and plants in the Moghul tradition. 6 of 9
An ancient well has been rebuilt too. Despite the magnificent gardens, the buildings are understated and no match for the later Moghul splendour of India. 7 of 9
Babur's tomb is elegant and simple. After successfully invading India in 1526, Babur died in Agra in 1530 aged 47. His body was brought back to be buried here. 8 of 9
Examples of Moghul calligraphy that survived the wars: On the right is Babur's epitaph which traces his lineage back to Timur on his father's side and Genghis Khan on his mother's. 9 of 9
Babur never took to India. His Baburnama memoir laments that there were "no grapes, no musk melons, no first rate fruits or bread in its bazaars".

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